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Don't read this book yet if you haven't read any others in the series. At least go back to Death of a Glutton and follow that with Death of a Travelling Man before taking on Death of a Charming Man. But if you can go to the beginning, Death of a Gossip, that would be best.

At the end of Death of a Travelling Man a false rumor spreads that Hamish and Priscilla Halburton-Smythe are engaged. Faced with everyone believing so, Hamish and Priscilla agreed to a sort-of engagement . . . just to see how things go. Hamish is wildly happy, and Priscilla is pleasantly open to the experience.

At the start of Death of Charming Man, Priscilla's well-organized ways are driving Hamish a bit batty as a new electric cooker is installed to replace his old wood-burning stove at the police station. Matters are made worse by Superintendent Daviot's wife who is out searching for homes that Hamish and Priscilla can buy in Strathbane. Hamish wants to stay in Lochdubh and live in the police station with Priscilla (without the cooker).

Wanting relief from all this, Hamish heads on Drim (a dreary place on his beat) to meet the new English arrival, a gorgeous young man named Peter Hynd who knows how to turn on the charm. There's something about Hynd that bothers Hamish. Those concerns grow when Hynd begins flirting with all of the middle-aged women in Drim who turn a bit batty themselves over the attention. Hamish is less pleased when Hynd invites Priscilla for dinner and later makes trouble over wanting to buy her scarf.

Matters are made worse in the Hamish-Priscilla relationship when the receptionist at the Tommel Castle Hotel decides to thrust herself on Hamish and create a scandal. Finally, Hamish warms Priscilla up a bit when police business intrudes.

When Peter Hynd leaves Drim, the men cheer and the women weep before going back to the old ways. Hamish is suspicious that there's foul play involved but cannot prove anything. An apparently accidental death follows that makes Hamish even more suspicious. But he's alone in his concerns. Feeling abandoned, Hamish takes his vacation to sleuth on his own. Before the book ends, Hamish finds that he's met his match in more than one way in this entertaining mystery.

Hamish Macbeth fans will find this to be one of the top books in the series. The development of the Hamish-Priscilla relationships is very find. The portrayal of the Peter Hynd character is well done. The villagers in Drim become interesting as well. The mystery is a challenging one, and most people probably won't get it until M.C. Beaton drops two clues to get you on the right track. The ending is full of interesting humor in which M.C. Beaton makes fun of her typical Hamish Macbeth endings.

Savor this one. It's very fine.
0Kommentar| 2 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 6. Juni 2000
Hamish MacBeth, the unamibitious and unlucky in love Police Constable of village of Lochdubh, finds himself both promoted and unofficially engaged to the cooly beautiful Priscilla Halburton-Smythe. However, a new inhabitant of the nearby and slightly sinister village of Drim is stirring up passions, and Hamish MacBeth is sensing trouble. The beautiful young man even tries to romance Hamish's unofficial fiancé, while the matrons of Drim flock to the hairdresser and the exercise classes and their men simmer and stew. Hamish smells something amiss when a local woman is found dead. Though it is labeled an accident - where has the charming man disappeared to? Who is covering up what? With a dose of highlands persistence, a strange pagan child, and a wee dram here and again, Hamish takes his mostly gentle persistence all around the countryside, despite instructions from headquarters and contrary to the gentle guidance of Priscilla, who seems to be more interested in just about anything than a passion for Hamish. Well written and sketched, an absolutely delightful cozy.
0Kommentar| 2 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
Don't read this book yet if you haven't read any others in the series. At least go back to Death of a Glutton and follow that with Death of a Travelling Man before taking on Death of a Charming Man. But if you can go to the beginning, Death of a Gossip, that would be best.

At the end of Death of a Travelling Man a false rumor spreads that Hamish and Priscilla Halburton-Smythe are engaged. Faced with everyone believing so, Hamish and Priscilla agreed to a sort-of engagement . . . just to see how things go. Hamish is wildly happy, and Priscilla is pleasantly open to the experience.

At the start of Death of Charming Man, Priscilla's well-organized ways are driving Hamish a bit batty as a new electric cooker is installed to replace his old wood-burning stove at the police station. Matters are made worse by Superintendent Daviot's wife who is out searching for homes that Hamish and Priscilla can buy in Strathbane. Hamish wants to stay in Lochdubh and live in the police station with Priscilla (without the cooker).

Wanting relief from all this, Hamish heads on Drim (a dreary place on his beat) to meet the new English arrival, a gorgeous young man named Peter Hynd who knows how to turn on the charm. There's something about Hynd that bothers Hamish. Those concerns grow when Hynd begins flirting with all of the middle-aged women in Drim who turn a bit batty themselves over the attention. Hamish is less pleased when Hynd invites Priscilla for dinner and later makes trouble over wanting to buy her scarf.

Matters are made worse in the Hamish-Priscilla relationship when the receptionist at the Tommel Castle Hotel decides to thrust herself on Hamish and create a scandal. Finally, Hamish warms Priscilla up a bit when police business intrudes.

When Peter Hynd leaves Drim, the men cheer and the women weep before going back to the old ways. Hamish is suspicious that there's foul play involved but cannot prove anything. An apparently accidental death follows that makes Hamish even more suspicious. But he's alone in his concerns. Feeling abandoned, Hamish takes his vacation to sleuth on his own. Before the book ends, Hamish finds that he's met his match in more than one way in this entertaining mystery.

Hamish Macbeth fans will find this to be one of the top books in the series. The development of the Hamish-Priscilla relationships is very find. The portrayal of the Peter Hynd character is well done. The villagers in Drim become interesting as well. The mystery is a challenging one, and most people probably won't get it until M.C. Beaton drops two clues to get you on the right track. The ending is full of interesting humor in which M.C. Beaton makes fun of her typical Hamish Macbeth endings.

Savor this one. It's very fine.
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am 4. Dezember 2015
Die Handlung erinnert an Band 2 oder auch 10 der Hamish-Reihe sowie an den Tierarzt oder den Hilfspfarrer in der Agatha Raisin-Reihe (Band 2 und 13). Hier wie dort gibt es einen charmanten Mann, der einige Damen im Dorf beeindruckt und dann ermordet wird.
Kaum vorstellbar, dass der attraktive Peter Hynd mehrere Damen des Ortes Drim so fasziniert, dass sie ihm verfallen. Das ist total überzeichnet. Hamishs Beziehung zu der frigiden Priscilla zieht sich hin, ebenso wie der Rest der Handlung, die düster und melancholisch wirkt. Enttäuschend.
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am 13. Mai 1999
Beaton seems to like to include children in her stories and has created an exceptional one here, twelve-year-old Heather who can raise the power of Celtic gods when needed. This is a wry commentary on the vulnerability of menopausal women ("the men's pause," it's called in these pages) and a darned good mystery to boot, which you won't fully appreciate until the very last page!
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am 10. Februar 1999
"Death of a Charming Man," as a novel, is just that--"charming"! And probably this is an apt word to describe all the Hamish Macbeth books by British sleuth writer M.C. Beaton (who also writes the popular Agatha Raisin series). Beaton's Macbeth books (all beginning with "Death of a ...") takes us to the Scottish Highlands and the village of Lochdubh. Hamish is a low-keyed police constable who'd rather be out poaching salmon or chasing the odd deer than tending to his constabulary duties; in fact, most of the townspeople consider him a bit lazy and unmotivated. He refuses to work toward promotion within the police department and often lets his superiors take credit for his solutions, which are always the correct ones by the books' endings.. No matter. Hamish is happy. He loves the Highlands, his dog Towser, and small town life (and here we are talking of VERY small town life!); however, even small towns fall prey to murderers and, as it has been in all the Macbeth stories, it is the constable's slow, plodding--but accurate--detective work that brings the murderer to justice. Beaton's works are not like the complex books of P.D. James or the skilled stylistics of Ruth Rendell or the literary awareness of Martha Grimes (all tremendous writers themselves), but they are worth reading. She captures, indeed, an essence of Scotland rarely seen since that earlier Macbeth, in thunder, lightning, and rain, managed to flood the stage with all those bodies a few centuries ago!). Beaton manages to incorporate just enough romance into her stories so that readers find themselves genuinely interested in whether Hamish will EVER be able to settle down and marry Priscilla, a high-born lassie with a mind of her own and who often as not assists in the investigations. Beaton, too, is able to add touches of wry humor here and there, and, granted, after getting into the series, the reader is generally able to predict much of the action. Still, this is a series that is a delight and shouldn't be missed. The Brits have begun filming a Hamish Macbeth series, which should hit the PBS circuit, too, we hope!
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