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am 3. August 1999
I was very disappointed with this book. The premise is very strong - 20% of your efforts produce 80% of your results and 80% of your efforts produce 20% of your results so focus on the most important 20%. Rather than buying the book simply repeat that 10,000 times and you get the exact same experience. Sure the book points out that 20% of your customers produce 80% of your sales and probably your problems but the book comes up very short on practical ways of using the 20/80 principle. Covey's First Things First is more practical and more succinct on the subject. Save your money for another book.
0Kommentar| 6 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 8. Juni 2000
Whilst i am sure that the author meant well in attempting to apply the 80/20 principle to non-business areas (more specifically- to personal relationships) , it has no place within this book,and should have been left well alone.
That said,despite that fact that the book can be somewhat repetitive,and even allowing for the author's almost sadistic love of big words (don't go near it without your dictionary to hand) -it nevertheless has to be said that as a BUSINESS ONLY book,to disregard about 80% of what he writes,gets you to the Pearl within the Oyster. And it is that Pearl (and for that reason alone) , that no one looking to go into business (or indeed already running a company) , should be without . ALL IN ALL ,WELL WORTH DIVING FOR.
0Kommentar| 4 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 11. November 1999
INTERESTING CONCEPT, TEDIOUSLY REPEATED.
I suggest readers borrow this book from a public library and take Richard Koch's Oxford tutor's advice (found on Page 25): "Read the conclusion, then the introduction, then the conclusion again, then dip lightly into any interesting bits.'
More than 80 per cent of the value of this book can be found in 20 per cent or fewer of its pages, and absorbed in less than 20 per cent of the time most people would take to read it through.
Thus re-confirming the 80/20 Principle.
QED
0Kommentar| 12 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 17. Mai 1999
Koch keeps babbling on about 80/20. 80% of his text is the number 80! Come on. There is little substance on how to apply the 80/20 rule. Rather, he just goes off and spouts examples of it in action. It bordered on religion!
I found more value in The Seven Habits than I did in this book. This is the type of prose and quality you can expect from a self-published author.
Save your money and buy the book on sale to use for firewood. My 20% worth...
0Kommentar| 2 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 8. August 1999
I have always found the 80/20 principle to be a valuable starting point in finding ways to improve performance. What I liked about this book was that it drew out more of the implications of that principle than I had previously thought about. If you are not familiar with the principle, this will be a good introduction. If you are familiar, you should probably stick to the implications. The review of what you know may feel a trifle repetitive. Another suggestion, if you keep repeating your focus on the top 20% in each situation, you will make your results geometrically better (more like 1 percent providing 95 percent). If you know people who are not familiar with the principle who are a bit, perhaps, disorganized, this book would be a good gift. Teach this to your children, and you will increase the likelihood that they will move out when they are grown, because they will be able to afford to.
0Kommentar| Eine Person fand diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 18. September 2000
This one will really make you think--with so many projects, issues, problems, etc., we deal with daily--a person can become overwhelmed and not know where to start. The 80/20 Principle really helps you to reframe your thinking as you start into the problem analysis mode. As the title suggest--it's the little things that can lead you to the big fix or solution. The author provides many examples of the phenomenon--The Pareto Principle. One of my favorites that I use on many occasions--is that last 20% of time left in a meeting is where you will make 80% of the decisions.
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am 7. November 2012
This book is expanding a simple principle into a bubble that gives no additional insight at all. In some areas it becomes dangerously irresponsible. For instance, when the author tries to expand the principle on investing money, claiming that all money should be concentrated on the 20% of stocks in your portfolio that are going to rise. Fair enough, if you can identify those 20% in advance. For the rest of us, who probably do not know the future, some intelligent diversification makes more sense. This book certainly belongs to the 80% that are not worth reading.
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am 28. März 1999
Editor, Stern's Management Review online, Stern's SourceFinder, and HRconsultant.com (stern@hrconsultant.com) Koch takes a fresh look at the 80/20 principle and finds that the basic imbalance observed by Pareto 100 years ago can be found in modern life. Whether you're investing, analyzing company sales, or looking at performance, you'll find that it's usually 20 percent that produces 80 percent of the total result. This book shows how to identify that 20 percent and get more out of business and life.
This same principle may be applied to books: 20% of them (at best) yield 80% of what is of significance; this book falls into that 20% category. Recommended. Reviewed by Gerry Stern, founder, Stern & Associates, author of Stern's Sourcefinder: The Master Directory to HR and Business Management Information & Resources, the CyberSpace SourceFinder, and the Compensation and Benefits SourceFinder.
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am 22. April 1998
The 80/20 principle is one of those books where the idea keeps turning over in your head for days after you read it.
The 80/20 rule is one that I use quite often in assessing business situations. The book consists of three parts, an introduction to the rule, its application to business and its application to one's life. Koch does a good job in showing how to apply the 80/20 rule in business.
The real kick from the book is how Koch applies the 80/20 rule to living one's life. If 20% of our efforts yield 80% of the results we can increase our productivity 100% by doubling our 20% activities and eliminating the 80% activities. This would leave you with 60% of your time to do other things, more time with family and friends, hobbies, talking a walk.
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am 6. Juli 2000
Though the 80/20 principle is easy to grasp, it is helpful to have a practical guide to get tips from. That's what this book is about. What I found most insightful is that Koch says not to manage your time better, but go through a TIME REVOLUTION. There are seven steps to do this. Of them, the best I think is to "Make the difficult mental leap of dissociating effort and reward....Hard work leads to low returns" There are many more useful tips in the book, so I recommend buying it.
0Kommentar| 4 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden

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