Fashion Sale Hier klicken Strandspielzeug Neuerscheinungen Cloud Drive Photos Learn More sommer2016 designshop Hier klicken Fire Shop Kindle PrimeMusic Summer Sale 16

Kundenrezensionen

3,8 von 5 Sternen
11
3,8 von 5 Sternen
Ihre Bewertung(Löschen)Ihre Bewertung


Derzeit tritt ein Problem beim Filtern der Rezensionen auf. Bitte versuchen Sie es später noch einmal.

am 4. Januar 2013
I am a teacher for mathematics and liked the book very much. It provided me with interesting stories about important mathematicians, physicians and of course the number e that I can use in school to fill the names of Newton, Bernoulli, Leibniz and Euler with life. I also think it is suited for advanced pupils, because most of the math in it is not very hard to understand.

What I did not like was the huge amount of errors in the kindle edition: In nearly every chapter are errors like the use of "l" (the letter) instead of "1" (the number), exponents are written as factors (i.e. "x2" for x squared) and so on. This is not really a big problem because of the math, but still it is disturbing and reduced the fun reading it.

Whoever is responsible for editing this book for the kindle-edition: Please edit it again and take a little more time. This is really an interesting book and does not deserve this amount of bugs.

The missing star is only for the bugged kindle-edition. The printed version may be better, but I did not read it.
0Kommentar|War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 5. Juni 2000
Galileo wrote that philosophy is written in the grand book of the universe, in a language of characters, circles, triangles, and other figures. Somewhere in this grand offering came the number e, which is the limit of the expression (1+1/n)^n, as n approaches infinity. It is a curiosity number, one that bridges Napier's original logarithms (which are to the base 1/e) and the origins of calculus. It was discovered at a time of exploding international trade, which is based on compound interest, whose formula you will recognize in the definition of e. It is the base of natural logarithms, a non-terminating, non-repeating decimal. e cannot be the solution to a quadratic equation that has integer coefficients.
This is a splendid book about a number as strange and useful as pi. Well written, this book can be handled by bright high school students and college students who have an interest not in solving math problems (the way we usually teach math), but in the history of math and this curious number. I read it for general interest and was very pleased with the entire book.
0Kommentar| Eine Person fand diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 2. Dezember 1999
Of the numerical histories you'll find via the links on this page, this is the easiest to read. Beckman's "pi," while more a history of ideas through one idea, contains more difficult math than this book, though not much of it. Nahin's book on i is very heavy on math, though some of it is very simple and a lot of it is repetitive in nature. All three are very good, and well worth reading. I enjoyed all in slightly different ways, but this one was the most, well, fun. The books, by the way, should be read in the order pi,e,i, as that is the order in which they were "discovered" and their use popularized. After reading them all, I am not sure that e is not a more subtle concept than i. See what you think.
0Kommentar| Eine Person fand diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 18. Dezember 1999
I see some lukewarm reviews of this book. I thoroughly enjoyed it. One reviewer spoke of "attmepts to spice up" the subject. For me they worked perfectly to give humanity to what is all to often a dry subject. The math is laid out in a perfectly understandable way, much better than most texts. The book not only describes the history of e, but also of the calculus, presenting a very understandable explanation of differential and integral calculus. I feel the book is very enjoyable for those who are quite familiar with the mathematics, but I also think that the book may be the ideal introduction to calculus for the high school student who has had algebra.
0Kommentar| Eine Person fand diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 22. Juni 2000
As someone who was taught math as a bunch of unrelated tricks for solving problems in textbooks, I was delighted by how Maor's masterpiece ties together logarithms, calculus, finance, science and history into a coherent story. The historical background to the development of logarithms and calculus is helpful in remembering the concepts. The math is accessible, and it's not all x's and y's: the book is generously supplied with graphs and figures.
0Kommentar| Eine Person fand diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 1. September 1999
This book is a nice mix of mathematical history and elementary calculus, although you'll have (hopefully) heard a lot of the material from your final (school) year's mathematics teacher. It's good bus-reading material--just a little too light on medium duty material for me to bestow on it a better rating.
0Kommentar| Eine Person fand diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 30. Januar 2000
I thoroughly enjoyed Eli Maor's book. It showed the historical development of mathematical analysis through the discovery of 'e' and its immense use, the climax being Euler's formula linking 'e', 'pi', 'i', '1' and '0'.
When I asked the loan officer of the bank where I keep my account what would be the interest of a loan at 10% per annum if compounded on a continuous basis, he had no idea that it would be limited by 27.18%. I recommended the book!
One curio for a future publishing: the shape of the Eiffel Tower is an exponential. If one cuts the tower at any height, the ratio of the volume above the cut to the area of the cut is constant.
0Kommentar|War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 2. Juni 1999
This book was a great experience and I couldn't put it down. One does, however, need to be mathematically inclided to fully enjoy the book.
0Kommentar|War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 12. August 1999
Being the second favorite number, Pi is #1, this book on 'e' was very informative.
0Kommentar|War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 15. Juni 1999
Maor wanders aimlessly, padding his essay with trivial sidetrips and attempts at spice. His imaginary conversation between Bach and Bernoulli is completely inaccurate regarding musical scales and just intonation. This book tries to approach Beckmann's _A History of Pi_ in its erudition, but it fails because it lacks the eloquence, elegance, and breadth that characterize the best popular books on mathematics.
11 Kommentar| Eine Person fand diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
Benötigen sie kundenservice? Hier klicken

Gesponserte Links

  (Was ist das?)