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am 14. Juli 2003
Ich habe Ernest Hemingways Romane in der Schule kennen und hassen gelernt - "Wem die Stunde schlägt" war mein persönlicher Langweiler. Und das führte dazu, dass ich nie wieder zu Hemingways Bücher gegriffen habe, obwohl ich wirklich eine Leseratte bin. Als ich vor kurzem noch einmal den Film "City of Angels" sah, in dem Meg Ryan "A moveable feast" liest und toll findet, kam ich auf die Idee mal nachzuschauen, um welches Buch es sich handelt und war überrascht eine Autobiografie zu finden. Ich habe es gewagt mir "A moveable feast" anzuschaffen und wurde sehr positiv überrascht. Hemingway schreibt leicht und interessant über seine Jahre in Paris um die 20er Jahre. Die Einblicke in sein Leben und die Schriftsteller um ihn herum (sehr interessant die Kapitel über die Reise mit F. Scott Fitzgerald) sind so verfasst, dass man das Leben vor sich sieht, wie es passierte. Ich habe hier einen Hemingway kennen gelernt, der spannend und kurzweilig schreibt. Nichts ist mehr da von dem Bild, das ich noch vor kurzem hatte. Ich werde jetzt auf jeden Fall mehr von Ernest Hemingway lesen.
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am 18. August 2014
My book group read this book, after reading the novel, "The Paris Wife."

This is Ernest's version of what happened in his first marriage and his life in Paris in the 1920s. There are lovely descriptions of cafe life, his toddler son, skiing in Shruns, running "the bulls" in Pamplona, and trips to the south of France with other Americans living in Europe.
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am 10. Januar 2011
My God, if you're a writer or hoping to be -- you will love this book! A short time ago I was rereading this, and I'm just struck by how enjoyable it is. Maybe it's even one of the reasons I set out to be a writer in the first place.

These are sketches of Hemingway's early days in Paris as he joined other expatriate writers and artists living there. Need I say more? How about that he recalls meeting the likes of Ezra Pound, Gertrude Stein, Scott Fitzgerald, and that the writing is quite beautifully understated and so easy to read.

What do I think of Hemingway, in general? In my opinion, he remains a model for that whole Raymond Chandler/James Cain school of noir writers.

Hemingway's short stories remain vital and are wonders of economy and understatement. If you pick up Collected Stories (Everyman's Library Classics), here's a few I recommend:

"The Killers"

"A Clean, Well-lighted Place"

"Indian Camp"

"The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber"

Hemingway, more or less, invented "minimalism." Just remember that when you're reading Raymond Carver stories. Bukowski has said that Hemingway was his model, too (only that Buk's work is less crafted and more intentionally primitive -- and injected with more vulgarity and humor). That Hemingway-esque striped-down, simple use of language is something that we (as writers) should all try to go for. Simple is always better.

What's interesting about Hemingway is that his writing is minimal yet also concrete. He uses language to evoke the physical, tactile experience of his characters, which very unlike the work of most well-known minimalist writers like Chuck Palahniuk, whose work, in my opinion, is more sketchy, with characters who are less real and three-dimensional.

Hemingway's novels have aged less well, in my opinion. The descriptive parts in all his books remain beautiful, but the terse dialogue and macho posturing/simplicity has dated them. We hardly ever get inside the heads of the characters and are subjected to view them from the outside, understanding them only from their limited behavior and dialogue (like in a movie). Others might disagree with my assessment.

Getting back to Hemingway's A MOVEABLE FEAST, it's highly recommended for all the impractical dreamers out there, like myself, in love with the romance 1920s Paris and the "Writing Life."
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am 19. Juli 2000
Hemingway's writing was always very auto-biographical, but in A Moveable Feast, published after his lifetime and written late in Hem's life, he actually uses real character names in recreating Paris of the 1920's. For any Hemingway fan, or for those interested in first hand accounts of life with Gertrude Stein, Alice Toklas, F. Scott Fitzgerald, James Joyce and others, this is truly a must read.
The book is everything that most late fiction by Hemingway is not. It is lean, romantic, and genuine, without the blustery heroes and stilted dialogue of missed efforts like the dreadful Across the River and Into the Trees.
Here Hemingway looks back fondly on his days with Hadley in Paris, slipping into cafes to sit all day and attempt to write over a cup of coffee. He remembers trips to the racetrack, a hysterical road trip adventure with Fitzgerald to retrieve a car, and other memorable details from the lives of the Lost Generation living abroad. He also takes shots at some so-called friends who turned on him, not passing up on an opportunity to get in the last word. There is some doubt as to whether Hemingway ever wanted this book published, but I am very glad that they did. It is a book to cherish and come back to every couple of years, and it had aged better than anything else Hemingway had written.
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am 25. Juni 2000
Whenever friends ask me why, at my age, I still love Hemingway, I smile and think about this book. They say "Hemingway' and conjure up familiar visions of the older, bloated and blighted boozer bragging about his macho accomplishments in the world of war and sports, while I consider the young Hemingway in Paris. I am thinking of a much younger, intellectually virile man, a far more alert, aware and alive Hemingway as a 'moveable feast' walking through the streets of a rain-swept Paris on a quiet Monday morning, heading to a café for some café au lait and to begin his long day's labor.
In this single, slim tome Hemingway beautifully and unforgettably evokes a world of beauty and innocence now so utterly lost and irretrievable both to himself, through his fame, alcohol, and dissipation, but also to us, for Paris as she was in the 1920s was a place made to order for the lyrical descriptive songs he sings about her in this remembrance; endlessly interesting, instantly unforgettable, and also accessible to the original "starving young artist types" so well depicted here. As anyone visiting Paris today knows, that magical time and place has utterly vanished. Tragically, Paris is just another city these days.
Yet this is a book that unforgettably captures the essence of what the word 'romance' means, and does so in the spare and laconic style that Hemingway developed while sitting in the bistros and watching as the world in all its colors and hues flowed by him. The stories he tells are filled with the kinds of people one usually meets only in novels, yet because of who they were and who they later became in the world of arts and letters, it is hard to doubt the veracity or honesty he uses to such advantage here. This is a portrait of an artist in full possession of his creative powers, full of the vinegary spirit and insight that made him a legend in his own time, and consequently ruined him as an artist and as a human being.
There are few books I would endorse for everyone as a lifelong friend. This, however, is a book I can recommend for anyone who wants the reading enjoyment and intellectual experience Hemingway offers in such wonderful abundance in these pages. Take my advice, though. Buy it first in paper, read it until it begins to fray and fall apart (and you will), and then go out and buy yourself a new hardcover edition to adorn your shelf, so on that proverbial rainy afternoon when the house is quiet, the kids are gone, and you just want to escape from the ordinary ennui and humdrum of life, pull "A Moveable Feast" down and hold it close enough to read. A cup of steaming tea by your side, return all by yourself to a marvelous world of blue city skyscapes, freshly washed cobblestone and unforgettable romance; return once more to Paris in the twenties, when life was simple, basic, and good.
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am 31. Juli 2000
A Moveable Feast is a memoir with all the movement of a fine novel. A young, struggling writer comes to Paris to live with his wife, baby and cat in a cold water flat. The uncertainty of his career, the lack of money, the cold winters should be insurmountable; in fact they are the best times of his life as Paris responds with affordable good food in corner cafes and the great company of artists and other writers, notably Gertrude Stein, Ford Maddox Ford, James Joyce and Ezra Pound. It is a place of becoming. The bubble darkens with the arrival of F. Scott Fitzgerald whose troubles transcend eccentricity, suggesting that money and success are not perfect ends, as Hemingway finds as he inescapably outgrows Paris. I hated to have this book end; it was like Hemingway was leaning toward me across one of those cafe tables, telling stories, confiding his heart. There was never a dull moment or word.
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am 18. Juli 2000
Good old Hemingway at his best? Certainly not. There are stories far better written, far more entertaining and also more famous by Papa Hemingway and if you are looking for a masterpiece of American literature you should try something else. "A moveable feast" lacks a plot or any logical order BUT - and that's what it's about - so does Paris. I was far from enjoying this book - I loved it. I lived in Paris myself and I tell you, nothing makes you feel more bound to the city than sitting in the Jardin de Louxembourg yourself or sipping a café au lait somewhere in the Quartier Latin whilst reading this book, knowing that Paris hasn't changed but it would change you - feeling just fine about it and thinking of Hemingway as a good old friend, whom you might bump into any minute!
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am 19. Juli 2000
Hemingway's writing was always very auto-biographical, but in A Moveable Feast, published after his lifetime and written late in Hem's life, he actually uses real character names in recreating Paris of the 1920's. For any Hemingway fan, or for those interested in first hand accounts of life with Gertrude Stein, Alice Toklas, F. Scott Fitzgerald, James Joyce and others, this is truly a must read.
The book is everything that most late fiction by Hemingway is not. It is lean, romantic, and genuine, without the blustery heroes and stilted dialogue of missed efforts like the dreadful Across the River and Into the Trees.
Here Hemingway looks back fondly on his days with Hadley in Paris, slipping into cafes to sit all day and attempt to write over a cup of coffee. He remembers trips to the racetrack, a hysterical road trip adventure with Fitzgerald to retrieve a car, and other memorable details from the lives of the Lost Generation living abroad. He also takes shots at some so-called friends who turned on him, not passing up on an opportunity to get in the last word. There is some doubt as to whether Hemingway ever wanted this book published, but I am very glad that they did. It is a book to cherish and come back to every couple of years, and it had aged better than anything else Hemingway had written.
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am 25. Juni 2000
Whenever friends ask me why, at my age, I still love Hemingway, I smile and think about this book. They say "Hemingway' and conjure up familiar visions of the older, bloated and blighted boozer bragging about his macho accomplishments in the world of war and sports, while I consider the young Hemingway in Paris. I am thinking of a much younger, intellectually virile man, a far more alert, aware and alive Hemingway as a 'moveable feast' walking through the streets of a rain-swept Paris on a quiet Monday morning, heading to a café for some café au lait and to begin his long day's labor.
In this single, slim tome Hemingway beautifully and unforgettably evokes a world of beauty and innocence now so utterly lost and irretrievable both to himself, through his fame, alcohol, and dissipation, but also to us, for Paris as she was in the 1920s was a place made to order for the lyrical descriptive songs he sings about her in this remembrance; endlessly interesting, instantly unforgettable, and also accessible to the original "starving young artist types" so well depicted here. As anyone visiting Paris today knows, that magical time and place has utterly vanished. Tragically, Paris is just another city these days.
Yet this is a book that unforgettably captures the essence of what the word 'romance' means, and does so in the spare and laconic style that Hemingway developed while sitting in the bistros and watching as the world in all its colors and hues flowed by him. The stories he tells are filled with the kinds of people one usually meets only in novels, yet because of who they were and who they later became in the world of arts and letters, it is hard to doubt the veracity or honesty he uses to such advantage here. This is a portrait of an artist in full possession of his creative powers, full of the vinegary spirit and insight that made him a legend in his own time, and consequently ruined him as an artist and as a human being.
There are few books I would endorse for everyone as a lifelong friend. This, however, is a book I can recommend for anyone who wants the reading enjoyment and intellectual experience Hemingway offers in such wonderful abundance in these pages. Take my advice, though. Buy it first in paper, read it until it begins to fray and fall apart (and you will), and then go out and buy yourself a new hardcover edition to adorn your shelf, so on that proverbial rainy afternoon when the house is quiet, the kids are gone, and you just want to escape from the ordinary ennui and humdrum of life, pull "A Moveable Feast" down and hold it close enough to read. A cup of steaming tea by your side, return all by yourself to a marvelous world of blue city skyscapes, freshly washed cobblestone and unforgettable romance; return once more to Paris in the twenties, when life was simple, basic, and good.
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am 13. März 2000
A Movable Feast is such an interesting look at life. I think the strongest part of the book was his way of extracting thoughts about life from the people he met and the little things he did. It seemed like everyone he met, he came away with a metaphor or something to life by. One of my favorite quotes from the book was after he had his meeting with the painter Pascin, "They say the seeds of what we will do are in all of us, but it always seemed to me that in those who makes jokes in life, the seeds are covered with better soil and with a higher grade of manure." I think his comments on life are what make the book so interesting and such a picture into how he felt. Another very strong point of the book were the characters. Although they were real people, he characterized them in such a way that he could say relatively little about them and they felt like such developed characters. It was especially amazing that so many famous people were in Paris at one time and it added so much to the story to learn about what they were like as people in just in passing during Hemingway's life. Many of them were just aquaintances but you came away with an understanding of them. There wasn't much of a plot so people who like big rockus plots wouldn't necessarily enjoy it, it was more of just a memoir of a specific point in time. The imagery was strong and added much to the pictures you got in your mind of Paris at that time and he used it to further his point, like how it felt being in Paris at night. His detail makes the book interesting and I enjoyed how when he had dialog it was as though the people were actually speaking, complete with curses and just obscure topics of conversation that any friends would have. It was in this way the characters came to life as well, and they were all interesting characters with vices and differences that Hemingway made sure to note to an often comic effect. Another aspect that made me really enjoy the book was it's pictures of what it is like to be a writer. I loved how he talked about his work and how certain times and places you could write so easily while others you couldn't. The book really seemed to be about what it is like to be alive and he took a very indepth and insightful approach to that which was easy because they were "very poor and very happy." I think not all people would enjoy this book because of it's longwindedness and wealth of detail that makes the story move rather slowly along with the fact that there is no fast moving plot. However it was a very enjoyable read and anyone who likes detail, interesting characters and a look at work, love and being alive.
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