Hier klicken Sale Salew Salem Öle & Betriebsstoffe für Ihr Auto Jetzt informieren Bestseller 2016 Cloud Drive Photos Alles für die Schule Learn More TDZ Hier klicken Mehr dazu Mehr dazu Shop Kindle AmazonMusicUnlimited longss17

Kundenrezensionen

4,6 von 5 Sternen
69
4,6 von 5 Sternen
Format: Taschenbuch|Ändern
Preis:5,99 €+ Kostenfreie Lieferung mit Amazon Prime


Derzeit tritt ein Problem beim Filtern der Rezensionen auf. Bitte versuchen Sie es später noch einmal.

am 19. Dezember 2008
Aravind Adiga hat einen grandiosen Entwicklungsrom geschrieben, der sich hinter Klassikern wie Grimmelshausens "Simplicissismus" nicht zu verstecken braucht.

Was Adigas Ich-Erzähler, Balram Halwai, hier vor den Lesern abfeuert, ist eine Breitseite gegen das Selbstverständnis eines aufstrebenden Landes, ein zutiefst negativer und doch überaus vergnüglicher Einblick in eine Gesellschaft, die nicht wirklich voran kommt. Sie ist gefangen zwischen Unbildung, Korruption, politischen Intrigen und der ständigen Hoffnung auf wirtschaftlichen Aufschwung.

Man wünscht sich mehr von diesen Büchern, mehr solcher würdiger Preisträger.
0Kommentar| 13 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 23. Februar 2009
Okay, so this is maybe not necessarily where the future of the novel lies, as one of the reviews on the novel claims but it certainly is a very good book. Granted, I felt that the book did not get better while reading it - but this must be because it gets off to such an amazing start. This is one of the few books where I constantly had the urge to underline sentences. It's not so much the beauty of the language at it is its tone that really drew me in - to quote just one example: "Have you noticed that all four of the greatest poets in the world are Muslim? And yet all the Muslims you meet are illiterate or covered head to toe in black burkas or looking for buildings to blow up? It's a puzzle, isn't it? If you ever figure these people out, send me an e-mail."

There is so much more that this book has going for it. There is Balram Halwai, the protagonist who loves chandeliers and is afraid of nothing but lizards (what lovely details!). He is unscrupulous and absolutely pensive at the same time. This character is a true work of art. Also, the novel is very convincingly structured. There is a lot of foreshadowing employed, and expectations that are created are fulfilled eventually.

I am very much looking forward to reading his next novel. There is a tendency for debut novels not to be the best thing a writer produces so it is absolutely possible that Aravind Adiga will give the world outstanding novels. Let's hope so.
0Kommentar| 15 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
TOP 500 REZENSENTam 8. Dezember 2008
Is this novel bitter, acid, sardonic, mocking, disillusioned, scornful, disrespectful, satirical, witty, or ironic? It displays, by turns, all of those qualities. The narrator's style perfectly captures the way that my Indian friends describe how government and personal privilege work in that country. While reading, I felt like I was sitting across from one of them having a cup of tea in a friendly Indian restaurant, and that reaction made me smile.

From this element, a false note creeps into this book. The people I know who express such views are highly educated Indians who have spent a lot of time outside of India. To make the book work, however, we have to believe that the writer is intelligent but has little education and experience outside of being a servant and driver.

Why did this debut novel win the prestigious Man Booker prize? I can only attribute the basis for that award to the obvious allusions to Crime and Punishment as Aravind Adiga explores how an impoverished Indian develops the consciousness to perform a great crime in a memoir-style novel filled with unrestrained humor. I've certainly read more humorous books by Indian authors in recent years.

As the book opens, we read a letter addressed "For the Desk of: His Excellency Wen Jiabao, The Premier's Office, Beijing, Capital of the Freedom-loving Nation of China From the Desk of: 'The White Tiger,' A Thinking Man, And an Entrepreneur, Living in the world's center of Technology and Outsourcing, Electronics City Phase I (just off Hosur Main Road, Bangalore, India." It begins, "Neither you nor I speak English, but there are some things that can be said only in English." The epistle is sent off in responses to the news that the premier is scheduled to arrive in Bangalore the following week. The White Tiger has been told on the radio that the premier wants to learn the truth about Bangalore, and the White Tiger is willing to fill him in.

As you will quickly spot in the first few pages, China and India come in for their fair share of satire in this work as well . . . providing contextual humor to keep the book from becoming too serious in its focus on India and its corrupt democracy that pretends to offer more.

The nightly letters continue for a week as The White Tiger (aka Balram Halwai) explains how he became an entrepreneur and how he conducts his business. If the humor starts to weigh on you, stick with it. The final part expresses a view that the new entrepreneurial class can choose to behave better than the old ownership class did. It's that hope that makes this book rise above the kind of satire that we all enjoy in newspaper columns about government corruption.

The book's great strength is that Mr. Adiga is able to pull together so many different aspects of Indian society into one novel. It's an imaginative concept backed up by solid writing underpinned by deep insight into this complex and interesting nation that presents so many apparent contradictions to those who aren't Indian.

One of the things I liked a lot about the book is that I could imagine The White Tiger living in Washington, D.C. and talking about the politicians there. That thought added a lot to my delight.

Have fun!
0Kommentar| 34 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 5. Mai 2010
The White Tiger by Aravind Adiga

The book 'The White Tiger' is the first book of an up to now completely unknown author fom India. The plot is about a young Indian named Balram Halwai who grows up in poor living conditions and his rise from a 'dishwasher' to a 'head waiter'.
Using his book, Adiga wants to give some pieces of information to the reader about the real life in nowadays India, away from the fantastic illusion of Bollywood and the Indian politicians who argue that everything is proper and harmonic in India.

The main themes Adiga deals with in his book are the social unfairness, the corruption of the officials, the problem of the caste system and the missing security in the social sector.
Adiga writes this book in a criticising way but it combines lots of emotions. It is funny, critical, witty, scoffing, ironic and full of black humor.

Balram is growing up in a really poor and rural area in India, in the so called 'Darkness' in which the landlords, rich and important people, rule.
The land belongs to them and everybody is dependent on them. There are just little and poor payed work options.
Adiga tells: 'Things are different in the darkness. There are every morning tens of thousands of yours men sit in the tea shop, reading the newspaper ['] or sit in the room and talking to a picture of a film actress. They know they won't get any job today. They give up the fight.' (pp. 54)
So Balram poses the question: Eat or be eaten? His dream is to break out of this world and become what resembles individuality, power and Liberty to him: a white Tiger.
He becomes a chauffeur at the house of one of the landlords' sons in Delhi who is a politician. Balram gets payed very well now and is very happy with his situation. Along the way while driving the car he notices how corrupt the people and politicians are and how many lines they cross just to get their will. They all are very selfish and just care about what's best for themselves and not for all the poor people they are surrounded by. He also senses that you can only achieve might and money by being immoral.
When he gets the chance to gain a lot of money to start a new life, far away from home, he murders his boss and takes the money that the boss originally wanted to use for other corruption.
In another City he opens up a cab company and makes it prosper through corruption.
Later he thinks: 'The new gerneration I tell you is growing up with no morals at all.' (pp. 316) In the end he really managed to break out of the old poor world and dive into the new one as a white tiger. Now he is independent, mighty and free just like he always wanted.

Aravind Adiga wrote a novel which 'captivates' you and you can't stop reading. He managed to combine reality and fiction and the achievement is an authentic novel that describes the current situation in India in a very good way. He wrote his book in English which made it easier for him to expand into the western market. The reactions to his book were very positive and it won the 'Man Booker Prize' in 2009. In his homeland India the people see Adiga as a traitor of his own country, to drag it into the mud and to pervert the facts.
I really enjoyed reading the book it was very fascinating and interesting. The book gave me an idea of what reality in India really looks like and that the country is not what it pretends to be.

In my mind: Buy it, love it, advise it !!!
0Kommentar| 2 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
Oh nein, nicht schon wieder so ein postkolonialer Roman, der der political correctness huldigt und seine Leser davon zu überzeugen versucht, dass Indien ja eigentlich doch viel besser ist als die korrupte westliche Welt. So dachte ich, als am 14. Oktober diesen Jahres Aravind Adigas Roman "The White Tiger" mit dem renommierten Booker Prize ausgezeichnet wurde. Dennoch habe ich mir den Roman zugelegt und erlebte eine große Überraschung. "The White Tiger" ist ein tiefschwarzer und brutal-zynischer Roman, der am Beispiel einer Person in einer so noch nie dagewesenen Offenheit einen Blick auf die korrumpierte Seele eines korrumpierten Landes wirft.

Ich-Erzähler des Romans ist Balram Halwai, der in einem Brief an den chinesischen Premierminister Wen Jiabao die Geschichte seines Aufstieges erzählt, die in einem Slum in der Nähe von Neu-Dheli begann und ihn bis an die Spitze der gesellschaftlichen Hierarchie führte. Und dabei wirft Balram einen schonungslosen Blick auf das Leben der zahlenmäßig gigantischen Unterschicht Indiens: "Things are different in the Darkness. There, every morning, tens of thousands of young men sit in the tea shop, reading the newspaper [...] or sit in their room talking to a photo of a film actress. They have no job to do today. They know they won't get any job today. They've given up the fight" (54).

Balram entkommt dem Elend seiner Familie, als der der Fahrer des erfolgreichen Geschäftsmannes Mr. Ashok wird. Nun erlebter hautnah die Spielregeln der Reichen und Mächtigen Indiens. Und da geht es ruppig zur Sache. Bestechung steht auf der Tagesordnung: "We're driving past Ghandi, after just having given a bribe to a minister. It's a fu----- joke, isn't it?" (137) flucht Ashok in einer Mischung aus Erheiterung und Ekel. In Balram wächst Wut, Zorn und Hass auf die Reichen und Schönen und dennoch hat er nur ein Ziel: Es auch in ihre Kreise zu schaffen. Noch zwingt er sich dazu, sich seinem Meister gegenüber stets gehorsam und unterwürfig zu zeigen. Doch seine Gedanken sprechen eine andere Sprache. Als Ashok ihn fragt, was denn wohl der Sinn des Lebens sein könnte, denkt Balram: "The point of living? [...] The point of your living is that if you die, who's going to pay me three and a half thousand rupees a month" (186). Irgendwann wird der Wille zur Macht so groß, dass Balram bereit ist, alles für sein Ziel zu tun.

"The new generation, I tell you, is growing up with no morals at all" (316) lautet Balrams bitteres Fazit wohl über die gesamte Menschheit, welches er anhand der Geschichte seines eigenen Aufstieges fällt. Der Leser verfolgt seinen Bericht mit einer Mischung aus Faszination und Ekel. Seiner illusionslosen Beschreibung der gesellschaftlichen Verhältnisse und deren Regeln, kann man sich einfach nicht entziehen. "The White Tiger" ist für mich der beste Gewinner des Booker Prize seit John Banvilles Roman The Sea aus dem Jahr 2005.
0Kommentar| 12 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 23. Juli 2009
Ich habe dieses Buch im englischen Original gelesen - in Indien. Ich habe dort mehrere Jahre meines Lebens verbracht, kenne Indien also nicht nur als Tourist sondern auch in seiner Tiefe.

Es ist wunderbar das nun (2008) endlich mehrere Werke (dazu zähle ich auch "Slumdog Millionär") Aufmerksamkeit auf ein Indien abseits von Bollywood und Yoga-Ashrams lenkten. Den tatsächlich machen die wenigsten Inder Yoga und Bollywood versucht auch nur den schöne Schein zu bewahren.

Diese rasant geschriebene Geschichte beschreibt praktisch das moderne Märchen vom Tellerwäscher (Chai-Verkäufer) zum Millionär - allerdings unter indischen Gesetzmässigkeiten.

Mit all der in diesem Land herrschenden Korruption, keinen tut etwas ohne Bakschish, ungesühnte Kriminalität und dem Streben nach Macht, Macht und nochmals Macht. Denn Macht bedeutet in Indien Ansehen.
Und Ansehen ist hier alles, egal was die Leute hinter deinem Rücken reden.

Insofern verwundert es mich ein wenig, wenn die Leute das Buch als "herrlich ironisch" bewerten....äh, also...das ist alles Realität in diesem Land und keinesfalls überzogen. Aber ich würdes es vermutlich auch nicht glauben, wenn ich es nicht schon mit eigenen Augen gesehen hätte.

Ich hoffe auf eine baldige Übersetzung für den deutschen Markt!
0Kommentar| 26 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
Oh nein, nicht schon wieder so ein postkolonialer Roman, der der political correctness huldigt und seine Leser davon zu überzeugen versucht, dass Indien ja eigentlich doch viel besser ist als die korrupte westliche Welt. So dachte ich, als am 14. Oktober diesen Jahres Aravind Adigas Roman "The White Tiger" mit dem renommierten Booker Prize ausgezeichnet wurde. Dennoch habe ich mir den Roman zugelegt und erlebte eine große Überraschung. "The White Tiger" ist ein tiefschwarzer und brutal-zynischer Roman, der am Beispiel einer Person in einer so noch nie dagewesenen Offenheit einen Blick auf die korrumpierte Seele eines korrumpierten Landes wirft.

Ich-Erzähler des Romans ist Balram Halwai, der in einem Brief an den chinesischen Premierminister Wen Jiabao die Geschichte seines Aufstieges erzählt, die in einem Slum in der Nähe von Neu-Dheli begann und ihn bis an die Spitze der gesellschaftlichen Hierarchie führte. Und dabei wirft Balram einen schonungslosen Blick auf das Leben der zahlenmäßig gigantischen Unterschicht Indiens: "Things are different in the Darkness. There, every morning, tens of thousands of young men sit in the tea shop, reading the newspaper [...] or sit in their room talking to a photo of a film actress. They have no job to do today. They know they won't get any job today. They've given up the fight" (54).

Balram entkommt dem Elend seiner Familie, als der der Fahrer des erfolgreichen Geschäftsmannes Mr. Ashok wird. Nun erlebter hautnah die Spielregeln der Reichen und Mächtigen Indiens. Und da geht es ruppig zur Sache. Bestechung steht auf der Tagesordnung: "We're driving past Ghandi, after just having given a bribe to a minister. It's a fu----- joke, isn't it?" (137) flucht Ashok in einer Mischung aus Erheiterung und Ekel. In Balram wächst Wut, Zorn und Hass auf die Reichen und Schönen und dennoch hat er nur ein Ziel: Es auch in ihre Kreise zu schaffen. Noch zwingt er sich dazu, sich seinem Meister gegenüber stets gehorsam und unterwürfig zu zeigen. Doch seine Gedanken sprechen eine andere Sprache. Als Ashok ihn fragt, was denn wohl der Sinn des Lebens sein könnte, denkt Balram: "The point of living? [...] The point of your living is that if you die, who's going to pay me three and a half thousand rupees a month" (186). Irgendwann wird der Wille zur Macht so groß, dass Balram bereit ist, alles für sein Ziel zu tun.

"The new generation, I tell you, is growing up with no morals at all" (316) lautet Balrams bitteres Fazit wohl über die gesamte Menschheit, welches er anhand der Geschichte seines eigenen Aufstieges fällt. Der Leser verfolgt seinen Bericht mit einer Mischung aus Faszination und Ekel. Seiner illusionslosen Beschreibung der gesellschaftlichen Verhältnisse und deren Regeln, kann man sich einfach nicht entziehen. "The White Tiger" ist für mich der beste Gewinner des Booker Prize seit John Banvilles Roman The Sea. aus dem Jahr 2005.
11 Kommentar| 48 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
TOP 500 REZENSENTam 8. Dezember 2008
Is this novel bitter, acid, sardonic, mocking, disillusioned, scornful, disrespectful, satirical, witty, or ironic? It displays, by turns, all of those qualities. The narrator's style perfectly captures the way that my Indian friends describe how government and personal privilege work in that country. While reading, I felt like I was sitting across from one of them having a cup of tea in a friendly Indian restaurant, and that reaction made me smile.

From this element, a false note creeps into this book. The people I know who express such views are highly educated Indians who have spent a lot of time outside of India. To make the book work, however, we have to believe that the writer is intelligent but has little education and experience outside of being a servant and driver.

Why did this debut novel win the prestigious Man Booker prize? I can only attribute the basis for that award to the obvious allusions to Crime and Punishment as Aravind Adiga explores how an impoverished Indian develops the consciousness to perform a great crime in a memoir-style novel filled with unrestrained humor. I've certainly read more humorous books by Indian authors in recent years.

As the book opens, we read a letter addressed "For the Desk of: His Excellency Wen Jiabao, The Premier's Office, Beijing, Capital of the Freedom-loving Nation of China From the Desk of: 'The White Tiger,' A Thinking Man, And an Entrepreneur, Living in the world's center of Technology and Outsourcing, Electronics City Phase I (just off Hosur Main Road, Bangalore, India." It begins, "Neither you nor I speak English, but there are some things that can be said only in English." The epistle is sent off in responses to the news that the premier is scheduled to arrive in Bangalore the following week. The White Tiger has been told on the radio that the premier wants to learn the truth about Bangalore, and the White Tiger is willing to fill him in.

As you will quickly spot in the first few pages, China and India come in for their fair share of satire in this work as well . . . providing contextual humor to keep the book from becoming too serious in its focus on India and its corrupt democracy that pretends to offer more.

The nightly letters continue for a week as The White Tiger (aka Balram Halwai) explains how he became an entrepreneur and how he conducts his business. If the humor starts to weigh on you, stick with it. The final part expresses a view that the new entrepreneurial class can choose to behave better than the old ownership class did. It's that hope that makes this book rise above the kind of satire that we all enjoy in newspaper columns about government corruption.

The book's great strength is that Mr. Adiga is able to pull together so many different aspects of Indian society into one novel. It's an imaginative concept backed up by solid writing underpinned by deep insight into this complex and interesting nation that presents so many apparent contradictions to those who aren't Indian.

One of the things I liked a lot about the book is that I could imagine The White Tiger living in Washington, D.C. and talking about the politicians there. That thought added a lot to my delight.

Have fun!
0Kommentar| 12 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 13. Juni 2015
I looked at the web-site of Aravind Adiga. Yes, he looks like an Indian, but he does not write like an Indian. He was educated in the US and worked there as a journalist. He has adopted a style of writing (or better he is imitating a style of writing) that is popular in the Anglo-American world. It is – as he says himself – influenced by the Afro-American writers like Ralph Waldo Ellison and James Baldwin. If you are Indian but do not write like an Indian you have a good chance to win the British Man Booker Prize. Adiga won the price for this book in 2008.
In seven letters to the Chinese President the protagonist of the novel (Balram Halwai) tells the story of his life. He comes from a backward village, gets the job as a driver and servant of a local landlord and goes with him to Delhi. He kills his master and steals a lot of money from him. With this money he builds up a successful taxi-enterprise in Bangalore – The language of these letters is totally unrealistic. A person with a background of Balram Halwai would never be able to write in such a style. Even if his English was as fluent as in these letters, he would not write like that. In this way the language of the text contradicts the content of the story in every sentence. – Reading the first part of the book I thought an American journalist had gathered all the clichés about India to fabricate a story around them. All well known stereotypes appear one after the other. The second part is a bit better. When Balram Halwai writes about his time a driver in Delhi the reader may build up some sympathy with his fate. The third part when he talks about the time after the murder and his career as the boss of a big taxi-company the books becomes really boring. This novel is not a literary text, it is the kind of pulp fictions that the drivers read while waiting for their masters. In Aravind Adiga’s book these novel are called “Weekly Murder”. Adiga has written one more of these murder stories. And the British public was very happy with it, because it contains all the stereotypes about India they like to believe in.
0Kommentar| Eine Person fand diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
TOP 1000 REZENSENTam 15. April 2009
Ein Buch, das man so schnell nicht vergißt - und auch ein zweites und drittes Mal lesen wird.
Einerseits tieftraurig, was die Lebensbedingungen der indischen "Unterschicht" angeht, andererseits gespickt mit viel Wortwitz, Energie, Ausdauer unseres Helden, der hier dem chinesischen Premier von seinem Aufstieg erzählt. Sein Aufstieg war nur möglich durch Mord und Diebstahl, das sollte man nicht vergessen, aber Balram, unser tragischer Held, erzählt ausführlich, wie es (fast) unvermeidlich dazu kam und warum er seiner Meinung nach keine andere Möglichkeit hatte...

Man erfährt viel über das Leben im Dorf in der Provinz, über Heiraten und Brautgeld, über Ausbildung und Hilfsarbeiterjobs, über das Leben der Reichen und "Arrivierten", über Dienstbotenschlafsäle im Keller der prunkvollen Hochhäuser - selten habe ich einem Roman so viel Gegensätzliches gelesen und erlebt - man leidet mit und lacht mit. Der Roman verfolgt einem noch tagelang - und das ist gut so! Denn das Leben in Indien ist nicht lustig und bonbonfarben wie in den Bollywoodfilmen, sondern besteht für viele Millionen Inder der niederen Kasten aus Dreck, Slums, Analphabetismus, Ausbeutung, Krankheit und frühem Tod.

Sicherlich nicht das letzte Buch dieses Autors, das ich lese - und sicherlich nicht mein letzter indischer Autor, denn ich werde mich gleich auf die Suche nach weiterem Lesestoff aus Indien machen.

Fazit: Sehr empfehlenswert.
0Kommentar| Eine Person fand diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden


Brauchen Sie weitere HilfeHier klicken