Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Öle & Betriebsstoffe für Ihr Auto Jetzt informieren PR CR0917 Cloud Drive Photos UHD TVs Learn More TDZ Mehr dazu Hier Klicken Jetzt bestellen Unlimited Fußball longSSs17



am 18. März 2017
nach allen Managementbüchern die ich über die Jahre gelesen habe immer noch das beste Buch für junge und erfahrene Manager in allen Managementebenen.
0Kommentar|War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 8. September 2017
The last 2 chapters,I found it so boring. The main point of level 5 core leadership do make sense and I learned something from the book.
0Kommentar|War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
TOP 500 REZENSENTam 12. Mai 2007
This study was stimulated by Mr. Bill Meehan's (head of McKinsey in San Francisco) observation that Built to Last wasn't very helpful to companies, because the firms studied had always been great. Most companies have been good, and never great. What should these firms do?

Jim Collins and his team have done an enormous amount of interesting work to determine whether a good company can be come a great company, and how. The answer to the former question is "yes," assuming that the 11 of 1435 Fortune 500 companies did not make it there by accident. The answer to the latter is less clear. The study group identified a number of characteristics that their 11 companies had in common, which were much less frequently present in comparison companies. However, the study inexplicably fails to look at these same characteristics to see how often they succeed in the general population of companies. If these characteristics work 100 percent of the time, you really have something. If they work 5 percent of the time, then not too much is proven.

How were the 11 study companies selected? The criteria take pages to explain in an appendix. Let me simplify by saying that their stock price growth had to be in a range from somewhat lower than to not much higher than the market averages for 15 years. Then, in the next 15 years the stocks had to soar versus the market averages and comparison companies while remaining independent. That's hard to do. The selected companies are Abbott Laboratories, Circuit City, Fannie Mae, Gillette, Kimberly-Clark, Kroger, Nucor, Philip Morris, Pitney Bowes, Walgreen, and Wells Fargo.

As to the "how," attention was focused on what happened before and during the transition from average performance to high performance. Interviews, quantitative analyses, and business press reports were studied. Clearly, there's a tendency to see things a little bit with 20-20 hindsight in such a situation. Since this study started in 1996, it was dealing with facts that were already quite old while they were being examined. Bias is likely.

The key conclusions as to "how" included the following:

(1) a series of CEOs (promoted from within) who combined "personal humility and professional will" focused on making a great company;

(2) an initial focus on eliminating weak people, adding top performing ones, and establishing a culture of top talent putting out extraordinary effort;

(3) then shifting attention to staring at and thinking unceasingly about the hardest facts about the company's situation;

(4) using facts to develop a simple concept that is iteratively reconsidered to focus action on improving performance;

(5) establishing and maintaining a corporate culture of discipline built around commitments, with freedom about how to meet those promises;

(6) using technology to accelerate progress when it fits the company's concept of what it wants to become; and

(7) the company builds momentum from consistent efforts behind its concept that are reinforced by success.

Then, a connection is made to how these 7 conditions can provide the foundation for establishing a Built to Last type of company that can outperform the competition over many decades.

One potential criticism of the study is that its conclusions could be dated. Former Stanford professor Collins argues that he has uncovered basic facts about human organizations that will be unchanging.

I compared the conclusions in this book with my own studies of top performing CEOs and companies in the 1988-2001 time period. I noticed two major differences that suggest a shift in "best practice" standards. First, those who outperform now have developed processes that create major improvements in their operating business models every 2-5 years. Second, senior management development is focused around improving a culture for defining and implementing such improvements. I suspect that item (4) above was an embryonic predecessor to these new dimensions, which occur much more frequently now than in this study.

Next, I compared the list of 7 items to what I had observed in companies. The biggest point that hit me is how few CEOs have been interested in creating long-term outperformance that lasts past their own tenure in an industry. You also have to be a CEO for a long time with that focus before you have a chance to make a lasting impact. Founders have a special advantage here. Perpetuating outperformance may help fill a psychological need for immortality that fits with founders especially well.

Finally, I thought about what I knew about the companies studied from personal contacts during the study years. My sense is that their stories are far more complex than is captured here. So, I think the data have probably been "scrunched" to fit together in some cases. In particular, I wonder whether these companies will greatly outperform in the next 15 years. In many cases, they expanded to meet an unfilled need that is now largely fulfilled. Can they develop a new concept for (4) that will carry them forward as successfully in the future? My guess is that most will not. If that turns out to be the case, we must conclude that the items on this list may be necessary . . . but may not be sufficient to go permanently from good to great. Time will tell.

Before closing, let me observe that if the research team had also looked at the rate by which their principles succeeded among companies that employed them, this would have been one of the very finest research studies on best practices that I have seen. A book like this will provoke much discussion and thought for years to come. Perhaps that information can be included in a future edition or printing. Then, we will have something magnificent to consider!

Do you want to be the best permanently? Why? Or, why not? Mr. Collins points out that it probably takes no more effort, but a lot more discipline and focus.
0Kommentar| 10 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 5. Oktober 2017
I bought this book because it was recommended to me by colleagues and mentioned by the CEO of the company I work for. It's not completely uninteresting but it really didn't appeal to me. Some thoughts are interesting, such as the idea that having very good employees is more critical than having a very good strategy but a lot of the thing presented as key findings sound like plain common sense ("hire the right people").

There are a few interesting anecdotes about mid-20th century corporate America but they could be told in a much better way.
The writing style is very boring. The same things are repeated 3, 4 times in the same chapter for no apparent reason.

Admittedly this is the first business book I read so it might have more to do with the genre than with this specific title, but for someone with a science background, the author's claims of the conclusions being "empirical" and based on data is laughable.

Now I know the book was written before the subprime crisis, but still praising Fannie Mae, a company that owes much of its success to intervention of the American government, comes off as clueless. The book says successful companies are "best in the world" at their core business. What is really meant is "best in the USA". Saying that Wells Fargo, or any American bank really, is the "best in the world" at anything sounds like a joke. American banks were awful back in then and are still awful today compared to foreign competitors (remember, this is a country where people write checks on paper and send them through the mail).

Unless you have to read this book for a course or something, I'd recommend to skip it.
0Kommentar| Eine Person fand diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 2. März 2002
More than 15,000 hours of research work went into this book, and it has really paid off. This is a well written summary of the key differences between 11 "good-to-great" companies and "direct comparison" companies.
Collins and his team identify seven key areas in which the "good-to-great" companies siginificantly differ from their "direct comparison" competitors. Some of their insights are surprising: e.g. "good-to-great" companies usually do not have well-known leaders.
Although the book is primarily academic and based on data, it is a good reading also for the practitioner who is not that interested in all the details of the research work. If you are, however, interested in the details of the methodology - Collins describes it in quite some detail in the appendices.
In summary, this is one of the best books I know that is suitable both for a business and an academic audience.
0Kommentar| 10 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 31. Januar 2006
Jim Collins beschreibt detailliert, warum viele Unternehmen nur "gut" bleiben und nur einige wenige den Sprung zu "großartig" geschafft haben.

Anders als bei anderen amerikanischen Management Büchern beschränkt sich Jim Collins nicht darauf aus dem Nähkästchen zu plaudern (was im Übrigen sehr unterhaltend sein kann), sondern belegt seine strategischen Schlüsse mit wissenschaftlichen Erhebungen. Aufgrund des methodischeren und wissenschaftlichen Schriftstils lässt sich "Good to Great" etwas schwieriger lesen als vergleichbare amerikanische Management Bücher, ist aber immer noch flüssiger und leichter zu lesen als die Deutschen Pendants ohne jedoch den Bezug auf eine fundierte wissenschaftliche Basis vermissen zu lassen.

Als Elementar für die Grundlagen für den Sprung von „gut" zu „großartig" beschreibt Jim Collins die Beantwortung folgender Fragen:
Was kann ich am besten?
Wofür habe ich wirklich Leidenschaft?
Welche wirtschaftliche Kenngröße treibt mein Geschäft?

Darüber hinaus hält Collins nicht generell die Mitarbeiter für den Erfolgsfaktor für Unternehmen, sondern die RICHTIGEN Mitarbeiter an den RICHTIGEN Positionen. "Get the right people on the bus and in the right seats".
Im Weiteren geht Collins noch auf die Bedeutung der „Igel" - Strategie ein, welches ich dem Leser hier jedoch nicht vorwegnehmen möchte.

Fazit:
Insgesamt merkt der Leser, dass sich Jim Collins und sein Forschungsteam fünf Jahre lang mit dem Unterschied zwischen "gut" und "großartig" intensiv beschäftigt haben und dadurch in der Lage sind handfeste Empfehlungen abzugeben.
0Kommentar| 13 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 17. Dezember 2012
Es handelt sich hierbei um den Wunsch eines Enkels. Leider verstehe ich den Inhalt nicht und kann ihn deshalb nicht bewerten.
11 Kommentar|War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 5. Oktober 2006
Jim Collins und sein Team machten sich - nach Built to Last - erneut ans Auswerten. Dieses Mal untersuchten sie Unternehmen die nach langen Jahren normaler Performance, eine langjährige (mindestens 15 Jahre) Outperformance des Aktienmarktes hinlegten. Sie versuchten herauszufinden, wodurch sich diese Unternehmen von vergleichbaren Peers unterscheiden. Die Dinge die sie fanden überraschten sie selbst. Im Folgenden ein kurzer Überblick über die entdeckten Grundkonzepte, die im Buch ausgeführt werden.

Level 5 Leadership: Eines der für das Team überraschendsten Ergebnisse war, dass es niemals die hochgelobten CEOs waren, die eine langfristig herausragende Performance schafften. Zurückzuführen ist das darauf, dass diese charismatischen Führer - oft auch Egomanen - niemals das langfristige Wohl des Unternehmens im Auge haben. Deshalb kommt es nachdem diese Leute das Unternehmen verlassen häufig zu einem Einbruch, weil niemand den Schuh anziehen kann. Schlimmer noch ist allerdings die Tatsache, dass durch diese Art von Führungskraft, die Mitarbeiter sich des Denkens enthoben fühlen und daher die große Stärke von Gruppen verloren geht. Collins schließt aus den erhobenen Fakten, dass es die "selbstlosen" Führer sind, wenngleich er sich korrigiert und sagt, dass diese natürlich nicht wirklich selbstlos sind. Dennoch haben alle gemeinsam, dass sie daran interessiert sind etwas Großes zu schaffen und nicht daran selbst gut dazustehen.

First Who ... Then What: Punkt zwei der Findings war, dass alle diese Unternehmen sich von einem Dogma verabschiedet haben, das die Managementliteratur seit Jahren unangetastet ließ. Collins zeigt auf, dass es entscheidender ist, die richtigen Personen zu identifizieren als eine Strategie zu haben. Diese starken Manager sind in der Lage die optimale Strategie zu finden, sie sind intrinsisch motiviert und verschreiben sich dem sozialen Gefüge und nicht der Strategie. Die klare - und oft wiederholte - Ansage lautet: Get the right people on the bus, get the wrong people off the bus. Interessant auch, dass Collins zwar darauf hinweist, dass diese Menschen sehr gern und viel arbeiten, dass sie aber eine sehr ausgewogene Work-Life-Balance haben. Frei nach dem Motto: "Work smart not hard".

Confront the Brutal Facts: Der Punkt lässt sich leicht zusammenfassen, obwohl Collins sehr viele interessante Worte darüber macht und es gut veranschaulicht. Kurz gesagt: Es braucht viel Realismus und nicht so viel Optimismus. Oder wie die alte Indianerweisheit schon sagt: Es hat keinen Sinn ein totes Pferd zu reiten. Dieses Kapitel ist ein Aufruf die Unternehmenskultur so zu gestalten, dass Menschen sich trauen Schwachstellen aufzuzeigen.

The Hedgehog Concept: Hier greift Collins zu der Fabel um Fuchs und Igel. Der Fuchs mit seinen vielen Ideen, wie er den Igel fassen kann und der Igel mit einer einzigen Ideen, aber dafür mit einer glänzenden. Der Fuchs erwischt den Igel niemals, egal wie sehr er sich anstrengt. Collins will hier letztlich darauf hinaus, dass jedes Unternehmen etwas braucht, das es ganz speziell macht. Ein Bereich wo es Weltspitze (bzw. Lokalmatador) ist. Danach braucht es noch die Disziplin daran (und nur daran) festzuhalten. Er geht darauf ein, wie dieser Punkt zu finden ist und wie er sich von der klassischen Strategie (die er nicht ersetzen kann) unterscheidet.

A Culture of Discipline: Freiheit und dennoch Disziplin? Genau das konstatiert er in den Top-Unternehmen! Die Mitarbeiter sind eigenverantwortlich an den Zielen orientiert, diese Art von Disziplin unterscheidet sich klar von derjenigen eines Tyrannen, der Disziplin durchsetzt. Ein feiner Unterschied, den Erich Fromm schon in "Haben oder Sein" beschrieb. Letztlich aber lässt sich dieser Punkt bereits durch die ersten beiden Feststellungen (Level-5-Leadership, Get the right people on the bus) dingfest machen.

Technology Accelerators: Ein ebenfalls interessanter Faktor ist, dass Technologie zwar von all diesen Unternehmen als Hebel eingesetzt wurde um ihre Pläne umzusetzen, aber sie wurde niemals zum Selbstzweck. Immer stand der unbedingte Bedarf an einer technischen Lösung im Vordergrund, niemals die Technologieverliebtheit. Gezielter Einsatz von Technologie ist sinnvoll und notwendig, aber nur so lange wie man weiß was man sich genau davon erwartet. Es kann dann sogar sinnvoll sein, unverschämt viel Geld in die Hand zu nehmen, aber das Ziel muss bekannt sein.

The Flywheel and the Doom Loop: Hier weist Collins nochmals darauf hin, dass diese Konzepte auf Dauer angelegt sein müssen. Hat ein Unternehmen einmal sein Hedgehog Concept gefunden, dann soll es daran auch festhalten. Alle untersuchten Unternehmen zeichneten sich durch Beständigkeit in der Verfolgung dieses zentralen Konzepts aus, während bei den Vergleichsunternehmen häufig Wechsel in dieser grundlegenden Strategie zu sehen waren. Um dies klar zu machen, nimmt Collins das Beispiel eines riesigen Schwungrades, das nur langsam in Gang kommt - und daher erfordert es Geduld um es in Gang zu bekommen, aber diese Energie geht nicht verloren. Wechselt man aber die Richtung, weil das Management meint es ginge zu langsam, dann vernichtet man die bereits investierte Energie - und der plötzliche Durchbruch gelingt dennoch nicht.

Soweit zum Inhalt. Das Buch ist sehr gut geschrieben, leicht nachvollziehbar. Auch wenn die Funde dem gesunden Menschenverstand entsprechen, sind sie doch diametral zu vielen anderen Lehrbüchern. Es ist ein Buch über einen neuen Ansatz für die Unternehmensführung. Nicht Glanz und Gloria, sondern Demut, Umsicht und Geduld sind die Forderungen von Collins. Ein ausgesprochen interessantes und wertvolles Stück Forschung.
22 Kommentare| 44 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 5. Juni 2016
Bei so mancher Manager-Biographie, von Iacocca über Ackermann und Middelhoff bis jüngst zu Winterkorn, frage ich mich, warum trotz sicherlich großer Erfolge und Cover-Stories in den einschlägigen Magazinen, am Ende die Bilanz stark durchwachsen aussieht, oft nur verbrannte Erde zurückbleibt und sich die Berichterstattung um Strafprozesse, horrende Verluste, Bereicherung, Mega-Boni, Fehlende Moral und ähnliches dreht. Jim Collins gibt die Antwort: diese Art Manager wird zu einem großen, manchmal dem überwiegenden Teil, vom eigenen Ego und der eigenen Karrieresucht getrieben, oft ohne Rücksicht auf Verluste und schon gar nicht mit Blick auf Nachhaltigkeit. Ganz anders die "Level-5-Leader": sie denken zuerst an die Organisation, das Team, die gemeinsame Sache, die Vision. Selbst sind sie eher bescheiden und suchen weder das Rampenlicht noch die Coverstory. Erfolg schreiben sie ihrem Team zu, während sie selbst bei Gegenwind den Kopf hinhalten. Sie schaffen ein Klima und eine Kultur, in dem Ideen und Karrieren gedeihen. Dabei sind sie keine zu unterschätzenden Leichtgewichte. Getrieben von großem Willen und Commitment, von Ideen und Visionen, legen sie auch die brutalen Fakten schonungslos auf den Tisch und verabschieden sich von Mitarbeitern, die nicht recht "passen". Sie fokussieren sich mit Konsequenz auf wenige große Themen und setzen ihre größten Talente auf die größten Potenziale, und nicht etwa auf die größten Probleme, wo die Chance nämlich hoch ist, dass sie verheizt werden oder nach Jahren des Kampfes gegen Windmühlen die Firma verlassen. Jim Collins beschreibt darüber hinaus noch viele weitere Eigenschaften von "großen" Leadern, stets mit guten Beispielen unterlegt: Die Botschaft in Summe (aus meiner Sicht): Empathie, Nachhaltigkeit, Ethik und persönliche Bescheidenheit stehen nicht im Gegensatz zu großen Erfolgen in der Wirtschaft. Ganz im Gegenteil: wirklich "Großes" kann nur auf diesem Nährboden gedeihen. Sehr inspirierend!!
0Kommentar| Eine Person fand diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
TOP 500 REZENSENTam 7. Mai 2004
This study was stimulated by Mr. Bill Meehan's (head of McKinsey in San Francisco) observation that Built to Last wasn't very helpful to companies, because the firms studied had always been great. Most companies have been good, and never great. What should these firms do?

Jim Collins and his team have done an enormous amount of interesting work to determine whether a good company can be come a great company, and how. The answer to the former question is "yes," assuming that the 11 of 1435 Fortune 500 companies did not make it there by accident. The answer to the latter is less clear. The study group identified a number of characteristics that their 11 companies had in common, which were much less frequently present in comparison companies. However, the study inexplicably fails to look at these same characteristics to see how often they succeed in the general population of companies. If these characteristics work 100 percent of the time, you really have something. If they work 5 percent of the time, then not too much is proven.

How were the 11 study companies selected? The criteria take pages to explain in an appendix. Let me simplify by saying that their stock price growth had to be in a range from somewhat lower than to not much higher than the market averages for 15 years. Then, in the next 15 years the stocks had to soar versus the market averages and comparison companies while remaining independent. That's hard to do. The selected companies are Abbott Laboratories, Circuit City, Fannie Mae, Gillette, Kimberly-Clark, Kroger, Nucor, Philip Morris, Pitney Bowes, Walgreen, and Wells Fargo.

As to the "how," attention was focused on what happened before and during the transition from average performance to high performance. Interviews, quantitative analyses, and business press reports were studied. Clearly, there's a tendency to see things a little bit with 20-20 hindsight in such a situation. Since this study started in 1996, it was dealing with facts that were already quite old while they were being examined. Bias is likely.

The key conclusions as to "how" included the following:

(1) a series of CEOs (promoted from within) who combined "personal humility and professional will" focused on making a great company;

(2) an initial focus on eliminating weak people, adding top performing ones, and establishing a culture of top talent putting out extraordinary effort;

(3) then shifting attention to staring at and thinking unceasingly about the hardest facts about the company's situation;

(4) using facts to develop a simple concept that is iteratively reconsidered to focus action on improving performance;

(5) establishing and maintaining a corporate culture of discipline built around commitments, with freedom about how to meet those promises;

(6) using technology to accelerate progress when it fits the company's concept of what it wants to become; and

(7) the company builds momentum from consistent efforts behind its concept that are reinforced by success.

Then, a connection is made to how these 7 conditions can provide the foundation for establishing a Built to Last type of company that can outperform the competition over many decades.

One potential criticism of the study is that its conclusions could be dated. Former Stanford professor Collins argues that he has uncovered basic facts about human organizations that will be unchanging.

I compared the conclusions in this book with my own studies of top performing CEOs and companies in the 1988-2001 time period. I noticed two major differences that suggest a shift in "best practice" standards. First, those who outperform now have developed processes that create major improvements in their operating business models every 2-5 years. Second, senior management development is focused around improving a culture for defining and implementing such improvements. I suspect that item (4) above was an embryonic predecessor to these new dimensions, which occur much more frequently now than in this study.

Next, I compared the list of 7 items to what I had observed in companies. The biggest point that hit me is how few CEOs have been interested in creating long-term outperformance that lasts past their own tenure in an industry. You also have to be a CEO for a long time with that focus before you have a chance to make a lasting impact. Founders have a special advantage here. Perpetuating outperformance may help fill a psychological need for immortality that fits with founders especially well.

Finally, I thought about what I knew about the companies studied from personal contacts during the study years. My sense is that their stories are far more complex than is captured here. So, I think the data have probably been "scrunched" to fit together in some cases. In particular, I wonder whether these companies will greatly outperform in the next 15 years. In many cases, they expanded to meet an unfilled need that is now largely fulfilled. Can they develop a new concept for (4) that will carry them forward as successfully in the future? My guess is that most will not. If that turns out to be the case, we must conclude that the items on this list may be necessary . . . but may not be sufficient to go permanently from good to great. Time will tell.

Before closing, let me observe that if the research team had also looked at the rate by which their principles succeeded among companies that employed them, this would have been one of the very finest research studies on best practices that I have seen. A book like this will provoke much discussion and thought for years to come. Perhaps that information can be included in a future edition or printing. Then, we will have something magnificent to consider!

Do you want to be the best permanently? Why? Or, why not? Mr. Collins points out that it probably takes no more effort, but a lot more discipline and focus.
0Kommentar| Eine Person fand diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden