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am 22. Mai 2017
Zwischendurch war es wirklich interessant, auch mit schönen stilistischen Elementen, aber alles in allem ist für mich die Story nicht rübergekommen. Hat mich nicht berührt.
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am 7. Mai 2000
From the first page, you're just sucked into the world of the main character, the detective Quinn. One of the best American writer today, Paul Auster's works are mainly based on his real life's experience. That is why his characters are so real. I disagree with the reader who said that his endings tend to be weak. It is very clear that Auster intended to avoid any closure in the endings of his stories. If you've read his other books, you'll realise that most of the time, his characters would just disappear or go on to lead another life, just like the character in Knut Hamsun's Hunger, who just decided to leave on a ship at the end of the novel without giving us any reason.
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am 30. Mai 1999
Before you get too excited from reading the other reviews, I will offer some words of caution.
The ending is weak. It is that simple. (Ending defined as the last chapter or two.)
Auster offers beautiful prose and the book reads quickly. It is intriguing, but when I finished it was as though Auster had written himself into a corner. All his brilliant questions could not be solved.
A novel does not need to answer everything. Leaving the reader to think is good, but Auster at second glance seems to lead the reader on knowing he cannot fulfil the experience with a proper ending. Yet, in some ways that is his point.
The book is worth reading if you have never encountered Auster before or read any existentialistic novels because then the book will be unique. Yes, unlike anything you have ever read before.
I have read of all of Auster's novels - except Timuktu which is just out - and they all seem to have this problem except for Mr. Vertigo.
Go to Auster for fancy prose. He is great at it, but do not expect a fulfilling ending.
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am 15. Dezember 1997
I'm not too sure about this one. I tried to go into it with an open mind, especially after being warned that it was a "little strange." Having enjoyed books such as Ishiguro's "Unconsoled" and other Kafka-esque novels, I was ready for anything. However, unfortunately, this book didn't seem to go anywhere. The story was interesting, as was the transformation of Quinn . . . but unfortunately, "interesting" doesn't make a good novel. Perhaps if the author had gone a bit deeper in his explanations and descriptions, and didn't limit himself to a mere 200 pages, something would have come of it. Unfortunately, i feel like the nights i spent reading this book were wasted time. I kept telling myself to go on . . . . that in the end it would be worth it. Finally, as I turned the last page, I realized i was wrong . . .
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am 5. August 1998
The only mystery in this book is where the plot jaunted off to. It started off as a mystery, a pretty good one at that, and then all of a sudden it was about a man who had totally lost his grip on reality. Intelligent writer on one page, human with no reason on next. Who in their right mind would train themselves to live like a homeless person for months, disregarding his own responsibilities, and then being surprised to find his life is not as he left it. The first half of the book had nothing to do with the second half of the book. What message was the author trying to convey with the second half of the story? This was the worst book I have read in years.
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am 30. Juni 1999
City of Glass is an incredible novel. Auster's prose is graceful, and elastic enough to express virtually any idea. It will carry you through the story even if you would rather not go. Auster employs as much subtltety as anyone could stand to impart the profound (and confusing) message of this novel. By the last page, I felt invigorated, perplexed, and grateful. Don't be put off by the ending, the message will be there if you only look for it. City of Glass is a rare book , worth absorbing, and one that will certainly be read and appreciated for many years to come.
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am 25. September 1999
I really liked City of Glass. I actually read it first when I found a copy of the comic book version in the library where I work and read it on a whim. I was in a bookstore the other day and noticed a book called "The Story of B" by an author named Daniel Quinn (the name of the "detective"/mystery writer in City of Glass. From the books jacket, I found out that it has a major character in it ("B"), who believes that the fall of man has something to do with the Tower of Babel and words losing their true meaning, JUST like the character Peter Stillman believes in the book City of Glass. Has anyone read both these books? Was Paul Auster secretly referring to Daniel Quinn, the author in real life, and his book, "The Story of B"? I think it's pretty interesting, personally. Any ideas or theories, please email me.
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am 12. Mai 1998
Unlike a certain simpleton above, any serious reader will appreciate Paul Auster's delicate shadings. If you're looking for a straight detective book, don't even go here. "City of Glass" is a metaphoric journey that explores many issues in life, not only big city life. Duality of persona, how words can masquerade as reality, transparent self-absorption and casual destruction are all touched on with a dreamlike hand. The only work of fiction I've read that is almost metaphysical in nature. You must be adventuresome to tackle this short read (and open minded). If not, the John Grisham section is up in front---same story, different character names. But you'll never come close to another book as enigmatic and intriguing as "City of Glass". It will stay with you for days.
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am 21. Oktober 1999
CITY OF GLASS OR CITY OF LONELINESS ARE TWO FACES OF VIRTUAL DETECTIVE QUINN. ACTUALLY, HE DOESN'T LIVE AND OPERATE IN THE SUBURBIAN ENVIRONMENT: HE LIVES AND OPERATE INSIDE HIS OWN SOUL, IN THAT LONELY UNIVERSE WHERE TIME IS...BUT SOMETIMES IT IS NOT. THE OLD STILMAN, THE YOUNG PETER, THE DOUBLE AUSTER AND QUINN HIMSELF ARE INDEED FOUR SIDES OF THE SAME ENTITY; PETER CRUMBLES THE WORLD, STILMAN PICKS THE FRAGMENTS UP, QUINN TRIES TO REORDER IT, THE OLD AUSTER DESTROY IT AGAIN. IN THE VAGUENESS OF THE CINESE BOXES PLOT, QUINN REVEALS REFLECTED PICTURES OF A MODERN POEM....WHERE LINES ARE STREETS WITH NO ACCENT AND NO RHYME, NO APPARENT LIFE... A POEM OF GLASS, WHOSE FRAGMENTS ARE PIECES OF LONELINESS.
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am 10. Juni 1998
I just did some searching on the 'net after reading City of Glass and found this little gem from some website re: Auster's works:
author : reader criminal : detective
It's an analogy that seems to hold for all detective stories that I'm accustomed to...except this one. In this one, the author is the criminal is the reader is the detective. So there you have it. Yeah, Auster's pulling triple-duty.
I had no idea that Auster was such a literary dude -- this thing is rather deep, lots of specific references (to Don Quixote, John Milton, etc.). Not for the faint-hearted, I'm afraid.
The ending left me kinda cold, though. It's a Borges-like ending; in fact, unless my memory fails me (which it does rather frequently nowadays), it's reminiscent of the ending of "The Garden of Forking Paths." Don't expect a knockout punch, for Auster subscribes to T.S. Eliot's "The Hollow Man":
This is the way the book ends This is the way the book ends This is the way the book ends Not with a bang but a whimper.
Also, Auster is obviously a big Mets fan, which is always a good thing. :)
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