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am 1. Februar 2012
Wells' more than a hundred years old book "The island of Dr. Moreau" is an exciting story about the dangers when man ties to manipulate nature.

In the 21st century man discovered the structure of DNA - the nucleic acid that contains the genetic information of every known living organisms -, cloned a mammal and modified organisms genetically. This advances in science Herbert George Wells (1866-1946) could not foresee when he published his third novel, "The Island of Dr. Moreau", in 1896. But his story about the sinister scientist feels more than a hundred years later no longer just like fiction.
When Edward Prendick stranded on a remote island somewhere in the Pacific Ocean, he soon learns that this is not paradise here, this island has some very strange creatures. "Every shadow became something more than a shadow, became an ambush, every rustle became a threat." Prendick meets the suspicious scientist Dr. Moreau, become witness of a vivisection - operations on living organisms -, and learns the truth about the creatures, "...this extraordinary branch of knowledge has never been sought as en end..." But then something goes terribly wrong and Prendick and the other men can only hope to survive.
From the beginng you are dragged into a very dark and dense story about the dangers man faces when he tries to manipulate nature. But Wells also raises some ethical questions. "It was not the first time that conscience has turned against the methods of research."
Before H. G. Wells became a writer and established himself as a pioneer of science fiction, Wells worked as a teacher and journalist and had studied biology at the Norman School of science.
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am 10. November 2014
Always a good read, and plenty to think about. Interesting to see how relevant Wells still is today. A visionary writer, and this story is full of disturbing thoughts and reflections on the way Science and humans meet. Insight into both, but as usual it is the insight into people that is most disturbing.
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am 5. November 2012
Die Story hat mir ausgesprochen gut gefallen. H.G. Wells hat mich auch hier nicht enttäuscht. Die Ausgabe ist gut gedruckt und auch das Preis Leistungsverhältnis ist einwandfrei.
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am 16. Dezember 2012
Das Buch verbindet Wissenschaft und Wahnsinn auf einem selten da gewesenen Level. Ein allgemein sehr zu empfehlendes Buch, vor allem für Leute, die die Bücher von Thomas Harris (Schweigen der Lämmer, Roter Drache, Hannibal) schon klasse fanden.
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am 5. September 2015
As with many of H.G.'s stories, it is a tail told by a narrator. Also at first, you may not notice his slipping in of social underpinnings.

Pendrick, our narrator starts out trying to tell how he was disenshipped and disappeared at sea for a year to turn up alive. His explanation is so fantastic that no one believes him. However after we read his account, we do.

He spent the bulk of his time on an isolated island with the mysterious Dr. Moreau, Moreau's right hand man Montgomery, and a menagerie of unique people. Where did they come from and what are they doing on this island? As the story unfolds, Pendrick realizes he is the next either on the operating table or for supper or maybe something more sinister.

This story has shades of William Golding's "Lord of the Flies". However, I can swear that I work with the very same creatures every day. Moreover, I will never look at my cat in the same way.

Somehow, I missed the movie version of this book, so I cannot compare them.
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am 10. März 2011
As with many of H.G.'s stories, it is a tail told by a narrator. Also at first, you may not notice his slipping in of social underpinnings.

Pendrick, our narrator starts out trying to tell how he was disenshipped and disappeared at sea for a year to turn up alive. His explanation is so fantastic that no one believes him. However after we read his account, we do.

He spent the bulk of his time on an isolated island with the mysterious Dr. Moreau, Moreau's right hand man Montgomery, and a menagerie of unique people. Where did they come from and what are they doing on this island? As the story unfolds, Pendrick realizes he is the next either on the operating table or for supper or maybe something more sinister.

This story has shades of William Golding's "Lord of the Flies". However, I can swear that I work with the very same creatures every day. Moreover, I will never look at my cat in the same way.

Somehow, I missed the movie version of this book, so I cannot compare them.
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am 5. Juni 2010
As with many of H.G.'s stories, it is a tail told by a narrator. Also at first, you may not notice his slipping in of social underpinnings.

Pendrick, our narrator starts out trying to tell how he was disenshipped and disappeared at sea for a year to turn up alive. His explanation is so fantastic that no one believes him. However after we read his account, we do.

He spent the bulk of his time on an isolated island with the mysterious Dr. Moreau, Moreau's right hand man Montgomery, and a menagerie of unique people. Where did they come from and what are they doing on this island? As the story unfolds, Pendrick realizes he is the next either on the operating table or for supper or maybe something more sinister.

This story has shades of William Golding's "Lord of the Flies". However, I can swear that I work with the very same creatures every day. Moreover, I will never look at my cat in the same way.

Somehow, I missed the movie version of this book, so I cannot compare them.
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In this allegorical novel, a shipwrecked biologist named Edward Prendick finds himself on a remote island where a physiologist named Moreau is conducting bizarre experiments in the vivisection of animals to generate new species (for no other purpose than just to do it). The way I view this novel, Moreau is doing this work simply for his own intellectual enjoyment. He sees a problem or a concept and is attempting to answer or address it. I don't think he even cares about publishing what findings he may have so that others might possibly use his results to improve the state of man. He simply doesn't care. Morality and ethics do not form a foundation for his "scientific" enquiries. And, that is the "evil" in his work.
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am 18. Mai 2000
Wells story is about shipwrecked, Charles Edward Prendick whom is adrift in an open boat when the boat is sightedby a passing ship. He rescuer is a man by the name of Montgomery. This man has a strangley deformed man as his servant. Prendick can not understand why he finds this man so revolting. The ships cargo is composed of animals bound for a small island inhabitated by Montgomery and Dr. Moreau. The secret on this island is the terrifying lifework of Dr. Moreau, i.e., creatures that look a bit like Montgomery's deformed servant.
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am 5. Februar 2000
Until I read this book, I didn't know that a serious novel about human like animals existed. Certainly H.G. Wells is not most well known as one of the fathers of sci-fi for this novel. It was one of his first, published in 1896, and the book lovers of the time must have really found this work disturbing and shocking. Maybe that's why The Island of Dr. Moreau has been playing catch up to The Time Machine and War of the Worlds ever since. I admit that I myself found the basic idea in this book very cruel, but I realized that the book covered other issues as well. Besides being the novel about an insane scientist who tries the hand at playing God, this book evokes thoughts of social responsibilty and freedom of all living things. Also, it shows that sometimes who we think of as being authority really have no right to be, and deals with anarchy and revolution. But it is the basic plot that has the most effect. Why does Moreau torture animals so that can make them in the image of man? Dr. Moreau beats Victor Frankenstein on who is a more of a nutcase. Frankenstein intended for something good to come out of his work. Moreau did his experiments just for curiosity. He didn't expect for his creations to have any real purpose. He didn't care for them. And yet he brainwashes his creations to fear and respect him, to treat him like a god, and follow his laws. And another thought occurs. What really seperates man from beast? What causes humans to sometime commit violent and brutal acts? What does that account for? When I read this novel, the reality of what genetic cloning may become years from now passed through my mind. If genetics had been an established science in the 1890's, Wells could of utilized it in this book, but he would probably have created a controversy beyond any proportion. But certainly the ignorance of genes back then was not his fault, and he came up with probably the best substition: vivisection. Being the substitute of what was unknown and likely more plausible, vivisection was more than enough to shock Well's audience of reading about the blasphemous idea of creating "Beast-People". I am certain that people in 1896 weren't ready for it. Neither are we. That's what I think is the main reason that The Island of Dr. Moreau isn't as popular as H.G. Wells other novels. I found, however, that this was a worthwhile read because its suspense and creepiness intrigued me, and it made me think of some social issues. If you're a person who can bear reading a grotesque story of cruelty and suffering, I highly recommend this book.
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