Sale70 Sale70w Sale70m Hier klicken Jetzt informieren Book Spring Store 2017 Cloud Drive Photos UHD TVs Learn More TDZ Hier klicken HI_PROJECT BundesligaLive Fire Tablet Shop Kindle PrimeMusic BundesligaLive longss17



Derzeit tritt ein Problem beim Filtern der Rezensionen auf. Bitte versuchen Sie es später noch einmal.

am 5. Dezember 2007
Sue Grafton is always exploring new subjects and new ways of writing for her readers. T is for Trespass continues that worthy heritage for this terrific series.

If you haven't read any books in this series, I suggest you go back and read them in alphabetical order beginning with A is for Alibi. You have a major treat ahead of you. The series develops over a number of years, and many references are clearer throughout if you've read the earlier books.

The writing innovation here is to have two narrators, Kinsey Millhone, and Kinsey's nemesis, named Solana Rojas, whom fate brings together in Kinsey's neighborhood to create a taut suspense story. You will see the future conflict clearly coming, but won't know what to expect. Sue Grafton does a wonderful job of filling the story with lots of surprises to heighten the suspense. The struggle between the two women is intensified by Solana being portrayed from the beginning as being the psychological opposite of Kinsey. You'll enjoy a heightened sense of tension by knowing what the two determined women are thinking about and planning to do.

The new topic is how some people prey on others in particularly chilling ways by taking advantage of the presumption we hold that we are surrounded by trustworthy people. It's a cautionary tale that will leave you wanting to do more to check out those with whom you and your family come into contact. The book is so powerful in this dimension that at times you'll feel like you are reading a nonfiction book about a tragedy.

As the book opens, Solana is looking for opportunity and Kinsey is looking for some work. Solana has just left her last job and explains what her objectives are in Chapter One. Kinsey picks up in Chapter Two to describe how detecting hasn't been very good lately. To make up for that, Kinsey has been serving summonses. Kinsey hears a sound while she's on her way to work, and that sound leads both women onto a collision course.

In the book, Kinsey works on several assignments . . . looking for evidence to clear a defendant in a car accident, assisting a landlord to remove deadbeat tenants, and checking out references for a new employee. She also finds that being a caring neighbor can be time consuming.

Kinsey's personal life is at a low ebb. She's not seeing anyone. She's stopped exercising, and her landlord Henry is her main source of company although he's increasingly taken up by a new woman.

As I started the book, I didn't expect much. After all, seeing that two characters are going to come into contact in unpleasant ways usually makes for good writing but weak plots. Well, I was wrong. The plot is even stronger than the excellent writing.

In typical Sue Grafton fashion, she brings in touches of the moment, winter 1987, to give the story a strong sense of time. In this case, she employs the fascination with old muscle cars that had developed by then to give a sense of two points in time. I was most impressed by this choice of a story-telling device.

Her sense of place is equally strong. I grew up not far from where "Santa Teresa" is set. In reading this book, I was called back into dark misty nights in that area when threat seemed to lurk in every shadow.

The story is so successful that it reminded me of the Greek tragedies, dressed up on modern circumstances. It's a remarkable accomplishment.

Brava, Ms. Grafton!
0Kommentar| 5 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
TOP 1000 REZENSENTam 6. Dezember 2008
Ich habe die ganze ABC-Serie gelesen und bin ein Fan von Sue Graftons Kinsey Milhone, auch wenn die Qualität der einzelnen Bände sehr schwankt.
Der neue "T-Thriller" gehört leider für mich zu den schwächsten der Serie - aber was hätte man aus diesem Thema alles machen können!
Der Nachbar und seine Pflegerin, eigentlich das Hauptthema des Buches, rangieren irgendwo am Rande unter "Ferner liefen",die ganze Thematik wird gar nicht ausgearbeitet, keine Vertiefung der Charaktere findet statt.
Dafür erlebt man Kinsey Milhone und ihre grauenhaften Fast-Food Eßgewohnheiten sowie ihre Besuche im ungarischen Lokal in epischer Breite. Auch die Freundschaft mit Henry und dessen Bekanntschaften werden ausführlich erwähnt.
Irgendwie wartet man das ganze Buch hindurch auf den großen Kracher, wartet man darauf, daß es jetzt endlich spannend wird. Aber Fehlanzeige.
Fazit: Eine müde Fortsetzung der Serie und nur bedingt empfehlenswert. Enttäuschend!
11 Kommentar| 5 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 21. Dezember 2007
Sue Grafton is always exploring new subjects and new ways of writing for her readers. T is for Trespass continues that worthy heritage for this terrific series.

If you haven't read any books in this series, I suggest you go back and read them in alphabetical order beginning with A is for Alibi. You have a major treat ahead of you. The series develops over a number of years, and many references are clearer throughout if you've read the earlier books.

The writing innovation here is to have two narrators, Kinsey Millhone, and Kinsey's nemesis, named Solana Rojas, whom fate brings together in Kinsey's neighborhood to create a taut suspense story. You will see the future conflict clearly coming, but won't know what to expect. Sue Grafton does a wonderful job of filling the story with lots of surprises to heighten the suspense. The struggle between the two women is intensified by Solana being portrayed from the beginning as being the psychological opposite of Kinsey. You'll enjoy a heightened sense of tension by knowing what the two determined women are thinking about and planning to do.

The new topic is how some people prey on others in particularly chilling ways by taking advantage of the presumption we hold that we are surrounded by trustworthy people. It's a cautionary tale that will leave you wanting to do more to check out those with whom you and your family come into contact. The book is so powerful in this dimension that at times you'll feel like you are reading a nonfiction book about a tragedy.

As the book opens, Solana is looking for opportunity and Kinsey is looking for some work. Solana has just left her last job and explains what her objectives are in Chapter One. Kinsey picks up in Chapter Two to describe how detecting hasn't been very good lately. To make up for that, Kinsey has been serving summonses. Kinsey hears a sound while she's on her way to work, and that sound leads both women onto a collision course.

In the book, Kinsey works on several assignments . . . looking for evidence to clear a defendant in a car accident, assisting a landlord to remove deadbeat tenants, and checking out references for a new employee. She also finds that being a caring neighbor can be time consuming.

Kinsey's personal life is at a low ebb. She's not seeing anyone. She's stopped exercising, and her landlord Henry is her main source of company although he's increasingly taken up by a new woman.

As I started the book, I didn't expect much. After all, seeing that two characters are going to come into contact in unpleasant ways usually makes for good writing but weak plots. Well, I was wrong. The plot is even stronger than the excellent writing.

In typical Sue Grafton fashion, she brings in touches of the moment, winter 1987, to give the story a strong sense of time. In this case, she employs the fascination with old muscle cars that had developed by then to give a sense of two points in time. I was most impressed by this choice of a story-telling device.

Her sense of place is equally strong. I grew up not far from where "Santa Teresa" is set. In reading this book, I was called back into dark misty nights in that area when threat seemed to lurk in every shadow.

The story is so successful that it reminded me of the Greek tragedies, dressed up on modern circumstances. It's a remarkable accomplishment.

Brava, Ms. Grafton!
0Kommentar| 2 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 10. Februar 2009
Es ist vielleicht nicht der stärkste Teil der Reihe, aber einer, der mich besonders bewegt hat.
Eine Frau stiehlt die Identität einer anderen. Solana Rojas ist in Wirklichkeit eine andere. Sie hat keine Ausbildung, einen fetten, faulen Sohn, und hat ihr ganzes Leben nur den eigenen Vorteil gesucht und betrogen und gelogen. Die echte Solanna Rojas ist Krankenschwester, die unechte nur Schwesternhelferin, aber schlüpft bei Gelegenheit in die "Schuhe" der echten. Auf diese Art nimmt sie einen Pflegejob bei einem pflegebedürftigen alten Mann an. Nach und nach verkauft sie alles, was sie kriegen kann, schottet ihn immer weiter ab und lässt ihn fast verkommen. Das Haus kann sie schließlich erst verkaufen, wenn er tot ist. Und man bedenke, die Dame hat Übung, sie zieht die Masche nicht zum ersten Mal ab.
Tja, aber mit Kinsey Millhone als Nachbarin des alten Herrn hat sie nicht gerechnet. Nachdem Kinsey gemerkt hat, das etwas nicht stimmt, ermittelt sie auf eigene Rechnung.
Schlimm dabei sind die Szenen, in denen beschrieben wird, was Rojas mit dem hilflosen Opfer macht, schlimm auch, wie leicht es ihr gemacht wurde.
Ich habe diese fiktive Figur so verabscheut, dass ich das Buch zwischendurch weglegen musste, so sehr tat es mir in der Seele weh.
0Kommentar| Eine Person fand diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 8. Juni 2008
The synopsis and other reviews cover the details so well. I would just like to add that every Kinsey story is well worth reading. Hearing so much about identity theft these days, Grafton uses this story effectively to bring home the point about this serious issue.

For me, there are others in the series that I liked better - most recently Q is for Quarry, as this brings Kinsey's family into play. Nonetheless, you shouldn't miss any of the books. Although best read in order so you can keep track of Kinsey's personal life (which also affects her casework), most of the books are excellent on a stand-alone basis as well.
0Kommentar| Eine Person fand diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 20. Oktober 2013
Ein eher ärgerliches Buch, wie ich fand. Ärgerlich, weil es ein sehr gutes Buch hätte werden können, wären da nicht die seitenfüllenden Details zu Kinsey Milhounes alltäglichen Verrichtungen und der überdramatische Schluss. Irgenwann fragt man sich, warum es der Atmosphäre oder dem Fortgang der Geschichte dienen soll, immer wieder lesen zu müssen, was Kinsey wie aufräumt, was sie frühstückt oder wie oft sie um welche Ecke abbiegt um beim Joggen oder Autofahren zu einem Ziel zu gelangen. Sehr gut gelungen ist der Autorin dagegen die Darstellung der Gegenspielerin Kinseys, deren kriminelles Tun gerade wegen der Selbstverständlichkeit, mit der es abgespult wird, eine beklemmende Spannung erzeugt. Über den größten Teil des Buches wirkt diese Figur in hohem Maße glaubwürdig und in der unerbittlichen Plausibilität ihres Handelns angsteinflößender, als Hannibal Lecter es je sein könnte. Sie verkörpert eine Soziopathie, die nicht superintelligent daher kommt und zu besonders ausgefallenen Verbrechen führt, sondern eine, die uns jeden Tag begegnen könnte und deren Grauen in dem Pragmatismus liegt, mit dem die Protagonistin tut, was im Rahmen der eigenen Logik vernünftigerweise getan werden muss. Reizvoll ist das Buch im ersten Teil vorwiegend durch den Gegensatz zwischen Kinseys hilflosen Versuche, ihren anfangs eher vagen, sich aber immer stärker verdichtenden Verdacht bestätigen zu können, und der Überlegenheit, mit der ihre Gegenspielerin diese Ansätze ins Leere laufen lässt. Im letzten Drittel nimmt das Buch Fahrt auf. Den Schluss fand ich aber, wie oben schon erwähnt, etwas übertrieben, weil Grafton hier exotische Elemente einfügt, die ich unnötig fand, nachdem sie vorher so sehr - wenn auch leider zu langatmig - mit dem "Schrecken des Gewöhnlichen" gespielt hatte. Insgesamt ein lesenswerter Krimi, dem aus meiner Sicht 50 Seiten weniger zu hoher Qualität verholfen hätten.
0Kommentar|War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 17. November 2011
Die Geschichte zieht sich wie Gummi. Um Seite 300 kommt ein Hauch von Spannung auf weil endlich mal ein wenig Bewegung in die Geschichte kommt. Und das war's dann auch. Ich finde die Ortsbeschreibungen ja auch schön - aber das alles habe ich nun schon 20x gelesen. Sue Grafton ja - dieses Buch besser nicht.
0Kommentar| Eine Person fand diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 4. Februar 2009
dieser Krimi geht um das aktuelle Thema der Altenpflege. Ein Nachbar wird krank und irgendwie erscheint die Pflegerin Kinsey suspekt.
Sie kämpft gegen Windmühlen und ihr geschätzter Nachbar wird zum Schluss auch noch bedroht.
Ein spannender Kinsey-Krimi, wie man ihn erwartet!
0Kommentar| Eine Person fand diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 16. April 2009
Die Grafton-Krimis, das heißt die Geschichten um die Privatdetektivin Kinsey Millhone in Santa Teresa, Kalifornien, sind im Gegensatz zu den englischen oder skandinavischen Hammer-Thrllern von Larsson, Mankell, George usw. locker und flockig und stellenweise witzig. Millhone agiert im heißen Kalifornien in ganz amerikanischer Manier. Die Ortsbeschreibungen sind immer derart, dass ich mich tatsächlich in diese kleinen heißen kalifornischen Städte ohne nennenswerte Kultur versetzen kann. Die Krimis sind wirklich Erholungskrimis.

Das trifft auch auf diesen zu. Bevor ich T is for Trespassing las, habe ich mir zwei Monate lang die Trilogie von Stieg Larsson eingezogen, die mich wirklich gebannt hat. Grafton schreibt anders. Auf ihre Weise sind diese Bücher genauso fantastisch.

Hier gehts um einen "Todesengel", eine sehr unangenehme Frau, die sich unter falschem Namen als lizensierte Krankenschwester in Privathaushalte einschleichen kann, um kranke ältere Menschen zu pflegen, die sie dann auch wirklich zu Tode pflegt, um sich an ihrem Besitz zu bereichern. Millhone ist so nebenbei mit anderen Aufträgen beschäftigt, sie recherchiert für eine Versicherung Betrugsfälle, sie liefert Gerichtsvorladen und ähnliches aus, to pay the bills. Als der Todesengel sich bei ihrem an den Folgen eines Sturzes leidenden Nachbar Gus (89) einnistet, erkennen sie und ihr Vermieter Henry im Laufe der Wochen, dass irgendwas nicht stimmt im Nachbarhaus. Sie ermittelt.

Empfehlenswert!
0Kommentar| 2 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
Sue Grafton legt die Handlung ihres neuen Romans in die zweite Hälfte der 80er Jahre und nimmt ihrer Heldin damit so nützliche Hilfsmittel, wie Computer, das Internet und das Handy, was es ermöglicht viel glaubwürdigere Bedrohungssituationen zu schaffen. Man vergisst leicht, wieviel sicherer unsere Welt in vielerlei Hinsicht durch diese Hilfsmittel geworden ist.

Die Darstellung der Sozipathin Rojas und ihres Opfers bleibt ein wenig flach, aber die verschiedenen anderen Probleme Kinseys und Henrys heben dies mehr als auf. Alles in Allem eine lebensnähere Version der Idee von Stephen Kings "Sie" und dadurch eminent lesenswert.
0Kommentar| 5 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden