flip flip Hier klicken Jetzt informieren Spring Deal Cloud Drive Photos Learn More HI_PROJECT Mehr dazu Mehr dazu Shop Kindle PrimeMusic BundesligaLive



1-10 von 31 Rezensionen werden angezeigt(4 Sterne). Alle 112 Rezensionen anzeigen
am 27. Januar 2012
This is a well written book from a journalist discussing an interesting sociological concept. Gladwell defines a tipping point as "the moment of critical mass, the threshold, the boiling point." That is when a concept or product becomes a "trend" and spreads throughout society.

The book seeks to explain and describe sociological changes that at first are "hidden", become "viral" (his term) and then make a mark on everyday life. He uses many "case studies" to present his concepts throughout.

Some of Gladwell's analysis is based on the "Six Degrees of Separation" study and from network theory. This is where he gets his basic information and presents his concept of "The law of the few". The people he describes as "connectors", "salesman" & "mavens" who with a particular set of social skills influence the rest of society.

This is good read and worth your time. It will make you think and try to deduce what will "Tip" next and become a major trend in society.
Eine Person fand diese Informationen hilfreich
|0Kommentar|Missbrauch melden
am 22. Juli 2017
Dieses Buch macht Lust darauf, sich mehr mit Soziologie und wirtschaftlichen Theorien auseinanderzusetzen. Einfach für den Laien geschrieben, der einen Überblick erhalten und mitreden möchte.
Eine Person fand diese Informationen hilfreich
|0Kommentar|Missbrauch melden
am 7. Juni 2017
Easy to read without being dumb, he makes some good points even if it falls short of scientific rigour. Don't regret buying it,won't re-read it however.
Eine Person fand diese Informationen hilfreich
|0Kommentar|Missbrauch melden
am 19. Juli 2016
Eine gute Urlaubslektüre aber gefühlt etwas überbewertet. Hatte mir doch etwas mehr Breite und Tiefe versprochen - daher hat es den Sprung in meinen Dauerbestand nicht geschafft...
|0Kommentar|Missbrauch melden
am 24. Juni 2015
Liest sich interessant und unterhaltsam. Im Laufe des Buches wiederholt sich allerdings einiges. Dies ist sicher beabsichtigt, um die Punkte besser zu veranschaulichen, könnte aber für meinen Geschmack weniger sein. Gegen Ende liest man deshalb deutlich schneller als am Anfang...
|0Kommentar|Missbrauch melden
am 4. Mai 2016
Die Geschichten mit denen sich Gladwell in diesem Buch befasst, sind durchaus lesenswert, z.B. über die Ideen und Produktion (und Philosophie) der Sesamstrasse oder die Entwicklung des Verbrechens in New York. Diese Teile sind interessant und gut erzählt - so in dem Stil der Freakonomics. Wer die Bücher mochte, der wird sicherlich auch hier gefallen finden.
Was man aber nicht erwarten kann ist eine kohärente Theorie, wann ein kritischer Punkt überschritten wird oder gar wie man so etwas gezielt auslösen könnte. Zwar identifiziert Gladwell drei kritische Faktoren, aber er bedient sich sehr dem, was im englischen "Retrofitting" heißt, d.h. er nimtm sich ein Phänomen und passt dann sein Modell so an, dass es er damit das Phänomen erklärt. Anders herum funktioniert das aber nicht: Er kann keine Vorhersagen aufstellen und er erklärt auch nicht, warum bestimmte Dinge _nicht_ kippen. So erklärt seine Theorie warum aus einem bestimmten Buch ein Bestseller wurde, aber nicht, warum aus anderen Büchern mit ähnlichen Vorraussetzungen nicht (oder auch nur warum aus anderen Büchern mit anderen Faktoren dennoch Bestseller werden). Ein Beispiel aus dem Buch macht das deutlich: Er vergleicht die zwei Boten Paul Revere und William Dawse. Der eine konnte im Bürgerkrieg erfolgreich Truppen mobilisieren, der andere nicht. Warum? Laut Buch ist die Antwort: Paul Revere kannte mehr Leute und war generell glaubwürdiger. Beweise? Keine, außer dass die Theorie das eben sagt. Das ist etwas circulär. Es kommt noch schlimmer: Im Kapitel über New York geht es um die "Broken Window" - Theorie - nur hier gibt es keine Multiplikatoren (sehr vernbetzte Leute), die das Verbrechen fördern. Was macht Galdwell? Er meint, die Graffitis wären die Multiplikatoren! Mit anderen Worten: William Dawse kennt weniger Leute als ein Graffitti?
Ich könnte noch mehr Beispiele bringen, aber es ist klar geworden, was ich meine: Gladwells Buch gibt keine brauchbaren Erklären warum manchmal etwas kippt und manchmal nicht (Schon die Definition vom "Tipping Point" laut Gladwell ist falsch: Er schreibt, es sei der Punkt, an der eine Exponentialfunktion vom horizontalen ins vertikale überginge. Aber so einen Punkt gibt es nicht! Es gibt nur einen Bereich). Daher wollte ich erst drei Sterne vergeben.
Aber ganz ehrlich: Die Geschichten hätten auch ohne Basis gut funktioniert. Ich mag Freakonomics und ähnliche Bücher und daher kann ich vier Sterne rechtfertigen. Wer aber natürlich die Theorie schlechthin sucht, wird herbe enttäuscht.
Eine Person fand diese Informationen hilfreich
|0Kommentar|Missbrauch melden
am 30. April 2000
I liked the book for its valuable insights into what is essentially viral marketing but I thought Gladwell sometimes strayed from sure, logical conclusions about the observed data. For example, he uses a syphllis epidemic in Baltimore to illustrate how the effects of relatively minute changes in public health policy tipped the balance and set off an "epidemic" of the disease. That's fine as far as it goes except that he then concludes that the disease somehow morphed -- that's a huge misunderstanding of Darwinian proportians. The disease didn't, in fact, change, people's behaviors did. This reflects what I think is simply his non-scientific background. That sounds like quibbling and maybe it is, but this imprecision, which is seen in other parts of the book as well, makes it somewhat difficult to accept the conclusions drawn.
I would have liked it if Gladwell had better linked his research to real marketing issues or other authors' work such as Geoffry Moore's discussion of early, middle, and late adaptors in "Crossing the Chasm" or "Inside the Tornado". Because he doesn't tie his work to anything bigger one finishes the book with a feeling of, "Ok, what do we do now." Perhaps his next book will provide an answer.
|0Kommentar|Missbrauch melden
am 26. April 2000
As someone who's worked in the advertising and marketing world for 21 years, I have to take issue with critics who complain that Gladwell's thesis is obvious. In my experience, the insights that form the core of the book - observations on Mavens, Salesmen, Connectors, the role of context, and the stickiness of ideas - aren't employed at all well by the majority of marketing practitioners. Gladwell describes emergent ideas from epidemiological and sociological research that could eliminate significant waste in marketing and advertising. He does so, too,in a style that's readable and engaging. In one sense, I found the book disturbing: I'm no Maven, or Connector, or Salesman, and Gladwell sure makes me wish I were one of them, given their abilities to facilitate change. Perhaps some of the "condescension" some critics complained of reflects their own defensiveness about their own shortcomings - who knows? But I recommend a close and thoughtful reading of The Tipping Point as an excellent source of ideas that ought to be incorporated in thinking about marketing today.
|0Kommentar|Missbrauch melden
am 2. Juni 2000
On the surface, this book is pop science for newspaper readers. It has an adequate index and many source notes, but few will mistake it for a refereed paper in a scientific journal. It is pleasant to read, entertaining, and doesn't make great mental demands on the reader. However, the reader might be surprised that the author, in describing the large effects of small changes, didn't mention Edward Lorenz' work on the Butterfly Effect. Mr. Gladwell's relating the results of folding a paper fifty times is not surprising to someone who has heard the story of the beggar who was granted one wish by a Prince: "Please, sir, give me a grain of rice on the first square of a chess board. Then, double the amount on each succeeding square."
Dismissing The Tipping Point out of hand, though, might be . . . mind you, might be . . . a huge mistake. Suspension of judgement is usually needed to discover something really, really big. Consider, the Earth moving. Could anything be sillier? Or, riding a light beam. Loony stuff, if ever there was. Yet Galileo and Einstein used these ideas to gain eternal fame. Is it possible that fixing broken windows could severely reduce crime? Can humans who are Connectors and ideas that are Sticky really have tremendous consequences for a nation? I don't know.
But, I have an idea. Fortune (June 12, 2000) had an article on crime in Russia, "Capitalism In a Cold Climate". Big crime . . . Bad crime . . . Overwhelming crime! What better test for the ideas in this book than to apply them in Russia. Is suggesting attacking such big problems with seemingly flimsy ideas really making fun of the ideas? Not at all. Atomic bomb explosions started as ideas scratched on paper. Space craft launches started as ideas scratched on paper. Science advances by someone proposing ideas, then someone testing them. Mr. Gladwell has proposed several ideas. Let's test them to see if they are profound or fluff.
|0Kommentar|Missbrauch melden
am 8. Mai 2000
Malcolm Gladwell presents an interesting story of the spread ofepidemics (whether they are biological or social). With very effectiveevidence, he theorizes categories of people who help pass social behavior on to the masses. His simple rules of behavior and powerful case studies weave a grand tapestry of the effects that the "Law of the Few", the "Stickiness Factor", and the "Power of Context" have on everyday life. The power of this methodology will be made apparent as marketers and sociologists use these ideas to promote the spread of information. As he puts it, by changing the context and the messenger, you can change the message, and that is where influencers should focus their efforts. All in all, this is a remarkable analysis that seems to be spreading to the masses like its own epidemic.
|0Kommentar|Missbrauch melden