find Hier klicken Sonderangebote PR CR0917 Cloud Drive Photos UHD TVs Learn More TDZ Hier klicken HI_PROJECT Mehr dazu Hier Klicken Shop Kindle Unlimited AmazonMusicUnlimited Fußball longSSs17



Derzeit tritt ein Problem beim Filtern der Rezensionen auf. Bitte versuchen Sie es später noch einmal.

am 13. Juni 2017
Worth a read if you can cope with depressing topics. A novel about coping with the consciousness of death arriving within the next few weeks or months. Interesting characters. A reminder of why we should get rid of all nuclear weapons on this planet.
0Kommentar|War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 9. Februar 2006
"On the Beach" was one of the first novels to describe what the aftermath of a nuclear war would be like, although the genre of post-apocalyptic novels goes back at least to Robert Cromie's "The Crack of Doom" in 1895. Edgar Rice Burroughs's Martians used radium bullets in 1912's "A Princess of Mars" and Upton Sinclair's 1924 novel "The Millennium: A Comedy of the Year 2000" involved atomic weapons. J.B. Priestly's "The Doomsday Men" in 1938 used radioactive material to disrupt the earth's crust. There was a nuclear war in the background of George Orwell's "1984," and the same can be said for the Ray Bradbury collection of short stories, "The Martian Chronicles."
Nevil Shute's "On the Beach" was published in 1957, which was the same year that the Soviets launched Sputnik and Nikita Khrushchev boasted of a super bomb that could melt the polar icecaps. That might explain why this became the most prominent nuclear war novel of the decade, if not for that entire generation. Shute quotes T.S. Eliot's "The Hollow Men" on the title page with the famous lines "This is the way the world ends / Not with a bang but a whimper," and indeed the novel is not about surviving the war but awaiting the end of the world. Given what we now know about nuclear winter, Shute's pessimism is actually somewhat understated, but that does not make it any the less disturbing.
"On the Beach" is set in Australia, two years after the war of which all anybody knows is that it put so much radioactive fallout into the atmosphere that there are eight months left before it reaches Down Under, where humanity is making its last stand. Unlike books like "Alas, Babylon" by Pat Frank in 1959, which deal primarily with how people try to keep on living civilized lives in the wake of an all-out nuclear exchange, "On the Beach" is about facing the inevitable end. Jonestown was still a couple of decades away and the story of the mass suicides at Massada was a minor historical footnote, so when the book was published there was nothing to color the horror of a continent of human beings choosing to end their lives with pills rather than succumb to the slow death by radiation poisoning (for that matter, there was not an active cultural debate on euthanasia either). There might not be anything more unrealistic in the novel than the idea that the scientific inevitable of the coming radiation is universally accepted. Yet that is a major factor in creating the depressing nature of the novel.
The focus of the novel is on a group of characters. Scientist John Osborne provides the necessary scientific details while tuning his racing car for the world's last Grand Prix. Peter and Mary Holmes are spending their final days taking care of their baby daughter and planning a garden they will never live to see. Their friend Moira Davidson chooses to sedate herself by constantly drinking, until she meets Dwight Towers, captain of the U.S.S. Scorpion, which makes him the highest ranking officer in what is left of the U.S. Navy. The two are able to provide some comfort for each other, but Towers still heeds the call to duty. When a mysterious message is received, being transmitted from Seattle where it is assumed every one is dead, Towers takes his submarine back to see if there is still reason to hope as time runs out.
Part of the problem with this novel is that most readers come to it after seeing the powerful 1959 film made by director Stanley Kramer, with its haunting use of the song "Waltzin' Matilda" and its insistent warning that "It's Not Too Late, Brother!" Shute's characters are much less compelling on the page and the screenwriters were remarkably faithful to many of the key elements of the novel so you do not really get the sense of reading it to get more of the story. There are those who complain that what little Shute has to saw about the war and its weapons of mass destruction does not make sense, but as was the case with the television movie "The Day After" such concerns are negligible because both narratives need the war to allow them to tell their stories. Paying attention to the details definitely misses the larger picture here.
Ultimately, "On the Beach" is more important historically than it is critically. This is not great literature, but it inspired many of the post-nuclear war novels that followed, such as Peter Bryant's "Two Hours to Doom" (which later became "Dr. Strangelove"), Helen Clarkson's "The Last Day," and John Brunner's "The Brink." If you have to choose between the two, watch the movie rather than read the book. But if you are a student of this genre, then you have to read this book simply because of its impact in this field. It is for that reason that I round up on this one.
0Kommentar| 7 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 5. September 2015
The basic story is that Albania sends a plane with another country's markings to bomb the U.S. and we retaliate. However this is not a pacifist (don't build bombs book). This is not a sci-fi book. It could be a speculative fiction or just speculative.

The story begins after the war is completed and radiation is now covering the world. Australia is the last place to be covered. You read how different people are about to meat their end, some with hope, others with reckless abandon. Still there are those like the US sub commander Dwight Towers is loyal to his country to the end by not allowing U.S. property in the end to fall into the hands of the Aussies.

The book was written in the Cold War Era environment. So many people think that it is about countries and war; others think this story is some anti war story. The reality is that it is a study of people meeting a sure end and how they react. Other readers will balk at the actions of the people in this story; yet when they meet the same situation we will see how realistic the characters are. Still others will balk at the predictability of the characters. Still this is how many people get over a crisis by being predictable. It is these characteristics that make this novel timeless. Someone else must think so or they would not have made an updated version for our not too distant future.
0Kommentar|War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 25. Juli 2015
The basic story is that Albania sends a plane with another country's markings to bomb the U.S. and we retaliate. However this is not a pacifist (don't build bombs book). This is not a sci-fi book. It could be a speculative fiction or just speculative.

The story begins after the war is completed and radiation is now covering the world. Australia is the last place to be covered. You read how different people are about to meet their end, some with hope, others with reckless abandon. Still there are those like the US sub commander Dwight Towers is loyal to his country to the end by not allowing U.S. property in the end to fall into the hands of the Aussies.

The book was written in the Cold War Era environment. So many people think that it is about countries and war; others think this story is some anti war story. The reality is that it is a study of people meeting a sure end and how they react. Other readers will balk at the actions of the people in this story; yet when they meet the same situation we will see how realistic the characters are. Still others will balk at the predictability of the characters. Still this is how many people get over a crisis by being predictable. It is these characteristics that make this novel timeless. Someone else must think so or they would not have made an updated version for our not too distant future.
0Kommentar|War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
Shute beschreibt in seinem Roman nicht den Verlauf des Atomkrieges, dieser hat ist schon längst stattgefunden (und wurde übrigens von Albanien begonnen!!). Thema des Buches ist vielmehr die Vorbereitung der letzten Überlebenden auf ihren kurz bevorstehenden Tod. Der Krieg hat alle auf der nördlichen Halbkugel lebenden Menschen sofort getötet. Die Bevölkerung auf der Südhalbkugel hingegen wartet auf die radioaktive Wolke, die alle innerhalb von wenigen Tagen töten wird.
Wie verhält man sich im Angesicht des eigenen sicheren Todes? Lässt man sich hemmungslos gehen und versucht die Situation im Suff zu ertragen. Oder versucht man letzten Tage noch sinnvoll zu nutzen, indem man, zum Beispiel, eine Ausbildung beginnt und sich das Trinken abgewöhnt?.
Anhand von ungefähr 5 Hauptcharaktern unterschiedlichen Alters, Geschlechtes und sozialer Herkunft, analysiert Shute diese Ausnahmesituation. Dem Autor, selber Mitarbeiter des britischen Militärs während des Zweiten Weltkrieges, gelingt dabei eine höchst unheimliche und beängstigende Vision der absoluten Zerstörung. Dieses Potential mag vielleicht auch daher rühren, dass der Roman, obwohl 1957 während des Kalten Krieges geschrieben, nichts von seiner Aktualität verloren hat. Gerade in den vergangenen Monaten und Jahren hat die Thematik der Massenvernichtungswaffen wiede an Brisanz gewonnen.
0Kommentar| 3 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
TOP 500 REZENSENTam 15. April 2015
Melbourne, Dezember 1962. Die Staaten der Nordhemisphäre haben sich mit 4700 Atombomben alle gegenseitig sehr effizient und für immer, den Gar ausgemacht. Es gibt nur wenige Überlebende, 2 U-Boot-besatzungen, die zum Zeitpunkt der Katastrophe auf Befehl ihrer Regierungen unter Wasser waren. Sie flüchten sich mit letzter Energie nach Australien, denn nur noch auf der Südhalbkugel ist das Leben möglich, oberhalb des Äquators ist alles und jeder tot, zumindest glaubt man das, bis man aus Seattle seltsame Morsezeichen empfängt, die keinerlei Sinn ergeben. Die Crew der USS Scorpion unter ihrem Kapitän Dwight Towers, soll dieses Phänomen untersuchen. Ihm zur Seite werden zwei Australier gestellt, der Marineoffizier Peter Holmes und dessen entfernter Cousin John Osborne als Wissenschaftler Berater.
Eines ist jedoch klar, auch den Australiern läuft die Zeit davon. Die Radioaktive Kobaltwolke zieht unerbittlich nach Süden. Erste Erkundungen der nördlichen Spitze Australiens zeigen, dass das Leben dort aufgehört hat. Melbourne bleiben noch ca. 6 Monate, dann ist auch für die Bewohner dieser Stadt die Zeit abgelaufen.

Was macht man, wenn man nur noch 6 Monate zu leben hat? Eine schwierige Frage für den Einzelnen, aber für die letzten Überlebenden der Menschheit, eine ganze Zivilisation, eine Stadt? Was macht man, wenn man weiß, es geht zu Ende, unaufhaltsam und unabänderlich. Diese Frage stellen sich die Protagonisten dieser Geschichte ebenfalls. Moira ist 24 Jahre alt, sie versucht ihre Angst und Frustration und Alkohol zu ertränken als Mary Holmes sie zu einer Party bittet um den Vorgesetzten ihres Mannes, den 33 Jahre alten Kapitän Dwight Towers zu bespassen, damit er sich nicht so unwohl fühlt im Kreise einer glücklichen Familie mit kleinem Kind und womöglich anfängt zu heulen, weil seine Frau und Kinder alle tot sind. Letztendlich heult sich Moira bei ihm aus, und fragt ihn, warum man überhaupt noch weitermachen soll, wenn letztendlich alles sinnlos ist, da im August das Leben aller enden wird. Die beiden werden Freunde bis in den Tod.
Mary Holmes verdrängt die Situation bestens, sie will einfach nicht daran denken und ihr Mann Peter ist verzweifelt, weil er nicht weiß, ob sie es tatsächlich nicht versteht oder nicht verstehen will. Er macht sich sorgen, denn wenn ihm auf der Mission nach Seattle etwas geschieht, muss Mary ihre gemeinsame Tochter, mit den von der Regierung zur Verfügung gestellten Medikamenten töten, bevor es mir ihr selber zu Ende geht, damit sie nicht unnötig leidet.
Der Wissenschaftler John Osborne jedoch beschließt pragmatisch, die letzten Monate, Wochen und Tage das zu tun, was er schon immer machen wollte, sich aber nie traute: Autorennen fahren. Ob er nun 1 Woche früher stirbt, was soll’s, er will noch mal Spaß haben und wenn er mit einem Knall geht, dann ist das auch OK.
Die schlimmsten Szenen des Buches sind, wenn die Protagonisten Dinge planen, die sie nie machen werden oder deren Nutzen sie nie haben werden. Mary und Peter bepflanzen den Garten für das nächste Jahr, die Farmer bestellen die Felder, alles wie gewohnt und doch zum allerletzten Mal. Die Entscheidung ist eine Einfache, entweder weitermachen wie bisher oder aufgeben. So läuft das Leben in Melbourne auch in den letzten 6 Monaten vollkommen normal und friedlich weiter, der einzige Unterschied, man macht halt auch Dinge, die man vorher nicht getan hätte, gibt sein Geld einfach aus uns feiert was das Zeug hält. Einige Rezensenten kritisieren dieses friedliche Ableben, warum gibt es keine Plünderungen, warum begehren die Menschen nicht auf? Aufbegehren – Gegen was denn? Würde das etwas ändern? Die Menschheit war schon einmal in einer ähnlichen Situation währen der schwarzen Pest. Damals machten die Florentiner genau das: Das Leben genießen und feiern bis zum letzten Tag. Die Bauern in England hörten auf für ihre Herren zu arbeiten, und machten nur noch das, was sie wollten und für richtig empfanden. Es gab keine Aufstände, es gab keine Kriege oder kein Aufbegehren, nur ein zurückbesinnen auf das, was wirklich wichtig ist und am Ende zählt, wenn man Bilanz zieht, und wer will da schon Scheiben zertrümmern und eine Stadt vorzeitig zerstören und sich so die letzten Monate des Lebens sinnlos ruinieren? Die Engpässe kommen schon früh genug, wenn ein Teil des Landes nach dem anderen unbewohnbar und tot ist. „After all, there’s not much comfort in leaving home and coming down here to live in a tent or in a car, and have the same thing happen to you a month or two later."

Oft wird kritisiert, dass zwischen Moira und Dwight nicht mehr als eine platonische Freundschaft besteht. Aber auch das ist absolut glaubwürdig. Für Dwight lebt seine Familie irgendwie noch, er hat ja nicht gesehen, wie die Menschen in den USA starben, für ihn ist das nicht real und meine Oma erzählte mir von genau einer solchen platonischen Freundschaft, die sie im WW2 mit einem Mann hatte, der ihr am Schluss mit ähnlichen Worten wie Dwight Moira dankt. Er dankt ihr dafür, dass sie ihm geholfen hat, seiner Frau treu zu bleiben, obwohl sie dafür selber einen hohen Preis zahlen muss, denn Moira liebt Dwight. Sie weiß aber auch, dass sie nie eine Zukunft haben werden, dass es für sie weder Hochzeit noch Kinder geben wird.

Dieses Buch ist ein Klassiker, denn es gibt wohl kaum einen Dystopischen Roman, der so unglaublich deprimierend und perspektivlos ist und dabei so prophetisch, denn „It wasn't the big countries that set off this thing. It was the little ones, the Irresponsibles.” Das kommt doch bekannt vor. Auch Dwight s Résumé "It’s not the end of the world at all, it’s only the end of us. The world will go on just the same, only we shan't be in it. I dare say it will get along all right without us." Lässt nichts an Klarheit zu wünschen übrig. Damit ist aber auch klar, warum nicht viele ihn gelesen haben, den nu rein sonniges Gemüt kann ihn lesen, ohne sich von der Klippe zu stürzen und selbst sonnige Gemüter haben danach wohl tagelang Albträume und Depressionen.
Das Buch ist so unglaublich hoffnungslos, dass man sich nach dem ersten Viertel fragt, ob man den Rest durchsteht. Nach 3/4 des Buches, als die Protagonisten einfach nur noch Leben und genießen und sich eigentlich wünschen, dass es bald vorbei ist, kann das der Leser nachfühlen, man will nur noch eines, dass es schnell vorbei ist, denn kaum etwas ist schlimmer, als das Warten auf ein sicheres Ende. Wie schlimm muss das Buch für jene Leser gewesen sein, für die es zu Zeiten des kalten Krieges 1957 geschrieben wurde, für Leser, die mit genau dieser Bedrohung lebten?
Das Buch wurde zweimal verfilmt. Das erste Mal bereits 1959 mit Gregory Peck als Dwight Towers, und dann 2000 als Remake für den Sender Showtime.

"I don't know … Some kinds of silliness you just can’t stop," he said. "I mean, if a couple of hundred million people all decide that their national honour requires them to drop cobalt bombs upon their neighbour, well, theres not much that you or I can do about it. The only possible hope would have been to educate them out of their silliness."
11 Kommentar| 3 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 10. Dezember 1999
"On the Beach" was published in 1957 at the height of the Cold War. Set in the near future (the early 1960's), people in Australia are waiting with dignity for radioactive fallout to kill them. A nuclear war in the northern hemisphere has already destroyed everything there. In a few months the same will happen here.
I read "On the Beach" in 1989. That same year I had seen "The Day After" and "Testament". For some reason I had a morbid fascination with the end of the world, and what might happen after.
"On the Beach" might seem a bit dated now. The consequences of nuclear war have been speculated upon for several years. In 1983 scientists came up with the nuclear winter theory, where all the dust and fallout from the explosions would block out the sun and cause the world to freeze over. It sounds plausible enough. Once the winter was over the ozone layer would be damaged and the planet saturated with ultaviolet light from the sun. Others argue that people would survive somewhere, not everyone would die from radiation.
Whatever the case, "On the Beach" is still a powerful book. It makes you wonder how you would feel, knowing how you were going to die and when. The Australians are fortunate in that they are offered suicide pills for when the pain becomes too much. People aren't so worried about nuclear war any more. But on the news this morning I saw Boris Yeltsin remind Bill Clinton that they still have a nuclear arsenal. This was after Clinton threatened Russia with sanctions if Russian forces attacked Grozny... But we've managed to avoid nuclear war up until now, so there's probably nothing to worry about. Is there?
0Kommentar| 2 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 24. August 1999
Nevil Shute (1899 bis 1960) hat in unvergleichlicher Weise die Kriegs- und Nachkriegszeit des sog. Kleinen Mannes zu Papier gebracht. Mit "Das letzte Ufer" ist ihm eine Fiktion gelungen, die noch über die Atombomben über Hiroshima und Nagasaki herausreicht. Die gesamte nördliche Erdhalbkugel hat verrückt gespielt. Die südliche Erdhalbkugel -Australien- sieht nun den unausweichlichen Tod näherkommen. Shute's größtes Talent, die Menschlichkeit darzustellen, kommt hier voll zum Ausdruck. Man sieht den Tod (die Radioaktivität) nicht, man riecht ihn nicht und man spürt ihn erst wenn es zu spät ist. Wenn dieser Roman auch nur Fiktion ist, die zu Shute's Lebenszeit keinesfalls so unwahrscheinlich war, muß doch jeder der den Roman gelesen hat sich anschließend fragen: "Und was würde ICH tun ?"
0Kommentar| 8 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
I fancied myself well-read. I also thought I had felt it all and conquered it all. But when my English teacher made me read this book, my universe was ripped into two pieces and forced down my throat in a way that hurt. I had to stop and look at what I held dear, how fragile it all really is, and my own mortality that I thought I'd accepted. It's impossible for me not to admire the characters in this book: facing their deaths, agonizingly slow in coming, with as much dignity as each individual could muster. Dashed hopes, dreams cut short, beauty that was never to be...innocent victims, and nothing left in the end but the waves sighing along the rocky shores of a nation that was nothing but a Dreamland to me before. Thank God something opened my eyes before I let them be closed by my own ridiculous faith in my own ability to fight and win invariably.
0Kommentar| 2 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 1. Juni 2011
After a promising start of relatable, realistic characters dealing with the fascinating topic of an impending end of days, the book stagnates. The characters go on with their mundane lives without any character development to keep them interesting. As the book continued, I found myself distracted by the sexism, the annoying stupidity of some of the characters that didn't add anything to the story, and a few points that didn't seem to represent realistic human or chemical behavior.
0Kommentar| 2 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden

Haben sich auch diese Artikel angesehen

13,49 €

Brauchen Sie weitere HilfeHier klicken