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am 8. August 2003
Wer englische Literatur schätzt und sich auf Gedankenabenteuer einlassen mag, muss die Bücher über Thursday Next und ihre Abenteuer lesen - und zwar im Original (vermutlich sind sie sowieso nicht übersetzbar). Zugegeben, dieser dritte Band könnte auch heißen: Lost in the Well of Plots, denn er ist eine Achterbahnfahrt durch die Romane von Dickens bis zu modernen Krimiserien. Natürlich fehlt auch ein bisschen Shakespeare nicht. Und wer schon immer mal wissen wollte, was die Charaktere von Wuthering Heights über den fiesen Antihelden ihres Buches denken, ist in diesem Buch genau richtig. Und was wurde aus Kapitän Nemo und der Nautilus, als sein Roman zu Ende war? Warum wird der Minotaurus mit Joghurt gefüttert? Wie fängt man einen misspelling vyrus ein? Wie betreiben Dodos Brutpflege? In diesem Universum der Bücher ist alles möglich und es ist ein Genuss, sich in diesem guten Buch zu verlieren. (Empfehlung: Vorher die ersten beiden Bände lesen, denn dort lernt man, wie man aus einem guten Buch wieder herauskommt!)
0Kommentar| 8 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
I read relatively little fantasy because authors usually make it too much work . . . and not enough fun. Jasper Fforde has exceeded my expectations for fun, and kept me chuckling for hours. Although I have not read the earlier two books in the series (a mistake I'll be sure to remedy quickly), I had no trouble picking up the story line and following the continuity. If this book were to be graded solely on the fantasy world that was created, this book would be about a seven star effort. The subplots could have been trimmed (especially Lola, Randolph, Captain Nemo and the nursery rhyme characters), and this would have been an outstanding book.

Alice in Wonderland is one of my favorite fantasy books, and The Well of Lost Plots clearly borrows from that inventive work while adding unique elements relating to how fiction is written, read and understood. Fans of Alice will enjoy meeting the Cheshire Cat, the White Rabbit, the King and Queen of Hearts and the Gryphon. The book also borrows heavily from the Wizard of Oz in its story of conflict between good and evil in a magical land where characters live according to the limits of their development.

As a writer, though, the book had me spellbound in its concoctions to pick up on all of the tasks that writers go through to create books. I often felt like I was traveling through my own mind rather than reading a book.

The book had me chuckling at the same time as a reader. There are constant references to important characters in fiction (such as Miss Havisham and Heathcliff) and plot devices used in those works.

What's the story then? Well, Thursday Next has left the real world for the Well of Lost Plots (the 26 floors of subbasement beneath the Great Library where all English fiction books are shelved)) where all stories are developed and protected. She's pregnant by her husband who was eradicated at age two in an earlier book. She's looking for temporary refuge from the threat to her life. While there, she finds she's been infected with a memory virus that is sapping her recollections of her husband. Miss Havisham is to be her guide, and helps her find a role filling in temporarily for another character in an unpublished book, Caversham Heights. Miss Havisham directs her towards becoming a Prose Resource Operative for Jurisfiction, those who help maintain the integrity of fiction. In that role, she's soon confronted with mayhem, death and a sinister plot that threatens fiction to the core. By book's end, she's made some progress in counteracting those influences, but clearly there's a fourth book to come in the series.

I sincerely hope that English teachers will seriously consider assigning this book to help their students appreciate the true potential of fiction to stir the imagination, inform, influence and intrigue.
0Kommentar|War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
I read relatively little fantasy because authors usually make it too much work . . . and not enough fun. Jasper Fforde has exceeded my expectations for fun, and kept me chuckling for hours. Although I have not read the earlier two books in the series (a mistake I'll be sure to remedy quickly), I had no trouble picking up the story line and following the continuity. If this book were to be graded solely on the fantasy world that was created, this book would be about a seven star effort. The subplots could have been trimmed (especially Lola, Randolph, Captain Nemo and the nursery rhyme characters), and this would have been an outstanding book.

Alice in Wonderland is one of my favorite fantasy books, and The Well of Lost Plots clearly borrows from that inventive work while adding unique elements relating to how fiction is written, read and understood. Fans of Alice will enjoy meeting the Cheshire Cat, the White Rabbit, the King and Queen of Hearts and the Gryphon. The book also borrows heavily from the Wizard of Oz in its story of conflict between good and evil in a magical land where characters live according to the limits of their development.

As a writer, though, the book had me spellbound in its concoctions to pick up on all of the tasks that writers go through to create books. I often felt like I was traveling through my own mind rather than reading a book.

The book had me chuckling at the same time as a reader. There are constant references to important characters in fiction (such as Miss Havisham and Heathcliff) and plot devices used in those works.

What's the story then? Well, Thursday Next has left the real world for the Well of Lost Plots (the 26 floors of subbasement beneath the Great Library where all English fiction books are shelved)) where all stories are developed and protected. She's pregnant by her husband who was eradicated at age two in an earlier book. She's looking for temporary refuge from the threat to her life. While there, she finds she's been infected with a memory virus that is sapping her recollections of her husband. Miss Havisham is to be her guide, and helps her find a role filling in temporarily for another character in an unpublished book, Caversham Heights. Miss Havisham directs her towards becoming a Prose Resource Operative for Jurisfiction, those who help maintain the integrity of fiction. In that role, she's soon confronted with mayhem, death and a sinister plot that threatens fiction to the core. By book's end, she's made some progress in counteracting those influences, but clearly there's a fourth book to come in the series.

I sincerely hope that English teachers will seriously consider assigning this book to help their students appreciate the true potential of fiction to stir the imagination, inform, influence and intrigue.
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am 27. April 2009
Jasper Fforde is, simply put, a genius.
I started with the Eyre Affair and the Thursday Next series shot straight to the top of my list of favourite books.
Thursday Next is a tough, sympathetic protagonist. The kind of girl you'd like to be. She's a take-charge, kick-butt,well-read heroine who starts off working in the Literary Detective Division in an alternative 1985 London, where pet dodos are the norm, and proceeds to Jurisfiction, the police inside of fiction (headquarters at Norland Park in "Sense and Sensibility").
In the first novel of the series, Thursday Next has to save a kidnapped Jane Eyre, figure out the true author of Shakespeare's plays and marry her guy while fighting against an aptly named villain, Acheron Hades.
Jasper Fforde has a knack for describing classic novels as though the reader has truly gone behind the scenes of these well-known tales, giving them a fresh new twist. A blast for any book-lover.
This quirky originality permeates all of his work, from the fundamental idea of policing fiction to a 120-year-old grandmother who can't die until she's read the ten most boring classics, and waist-coat wearing grammasites that prey on verbs.
I found "The Well of Lost Plots" slightly different from "The Eyre Affair" and "Lost in a Good Book" as more time is spent within the novels than in Swindon and, of course, there were barely any scenes with Landen. However, it was a brilliant read and absolutely hilarious.
Anyone who's a fanatic reader, has a penchant for detective stories and isn't hung up on reality will get a kick out of these, but I would recommend reading the novels in order as the plot relies heavily on the events of the previous ones.
Also: "The Big Over Easy" (from the Nursery Crime series by Jasper Fforde) takes on another dimension when read after "The Well of Lost Plots".
0Kommentar|War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
I read relatively little fantasy because authors usually make it too much work . . . and not enough fun. Jasper Fforde has exceeded my expectations for fun, and kept me chuckling for hours. Although I have not read the earlier two books in the series (a mistake I'll be sure to remedy quickly), I had no trouble picking up the story line and following the continuity. If this book were to be graded solely on the fantasy world that was created, this book would be about a seven star effort. The subplots could have been trimmed (especially Lola, Randolph, Captain Nemo and the nursery rhyme characters), and this would have been an outstanding book.

Alice in Wonderland is one of my favorite fantasy books, and The Well of Lost Plots clearly borrows from that inventive work while adding unique elements relating to how fiction is written, read and understood. Fans of Alice will enjoy meeting the Cheshire Cat, the White Rabbit, the King and Queen of Hearts and the Gryphon. The book also borrows heavily from the Wizard of Oz in its story of conflict between good and evil in a magical land where characters live according to the limits of their development.

As a writer, though, the book had me spellbound in its concoctions to pick up on all of the tasks that writers go through to create books. I often felt like I was traveling through my own mind rather than reading a book.

The book had me chuckling at the same time as a reader. There are constant references to important characters in fiction (such as Miss Havisham and Heathcliff) and plot devices used in those works.

What's the story then? Well, Thursday Next has left the real world for the Well of Lost Plots (the 26 floors of subbasement beneath the Great Library where all English fiction books are shelved)) where all stories are developed and protected. She's pregnant by her husband who was eradicated at age two in an earlier book. She's looking for temporary refuge from the threat to her life. While there, she finds she's been infected with a memory virus that is sapping her recollections of her husband. Miss Havisham is to be her guide, and helps her find a role filling in temporarily for another character in an unpublished book, Caversham Heights. Miss Havisham directs her towards becoming a Prose Resource Operative for Jurisfiction, those who help maintain the integrity of fiction. In that role, she's soon confronted with mayhem, death and a sinister plot that threatens fiction to the core. By book's end, she's made some progress in counteracting those influences, but clearly there's a fourth book to come in the series.

I sincerely hope that English teachers will seriously consider assigning this book to help their students appreciate the true potential of fiction to stir the imagination, inform, influence and intrigue.
0Kommentar|War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
I read relatively little fantasy because authors usually make it too much work . . . and not enough fun. Jasper Fforde has exceeded my expectations for fun, and kept me chuckling for hours. Although I have not read the earlier two books in the series (a mistake I'll be sure to remedy quickly), I had no trouble picking up the story line and following the continuity. If this book were to be graded solely on the fantasy world that was created, this book would be about a seven star effort. The subplots could have been trimmed (especially Lola, Randolph, Captain Nemo and the nursery rhyme characters), and this would have been an outstanding book.

Alice in Wonderland is one of my favorite fantasy books, and The Well of Lost Plots clearly borrows from that inventive work while adding unique elements relating to how fiction is written, read and understood. Fans of Alice will enjoy meeting the Cheshire Cat, the White Rabbit, the King and Queen of Hearts and the Gryphon. The book also borrows heavily from the Wizard of Oz in its story of conflict between good and evil in a magical land where characters live according to the limits of their development.

As a writer, though, the book had me spellbound in its concoctions to pick up on all of the tasks that writers go through to create books. I often felt like I was traveling through my own mind rather than reading a book.

The book had me chuckling at the same time as a reader. There are constant references to important characters in fiction (such as Miss Havisham and Heathcliff) and plot devices used in those works.

What's the story then? Well, Thursday Next has left the real world for the Well of Lost Plots (the 26 floors of subbasement beneath the Great Library where all English fiction books are shelved)) where all stories are developed and protected. She's pregnant by her husband who was eradicated at age two in an earlier book. She's looking for temporary refuge from the threat to her life. While there, she finds she's been infected with a memory virus that is sapping her recollections of her husband. Miss Havisham is to be her guide, and helps her find a role filling in temporarily for another character in an unpublished book, Caversham Heights. Miss Havisham directs her towards becoming a Prose Resource Operative for Jurisfiction, those who help maintain the integrity of fiction. In that role, she's soon confronted with mayhem, death and a sinister plot that threatens fiction to the core. By book's end, she's made some progress in counteracting those influences, but clearly there's a fourth book to come in the series.

I sincerely hope that English teachers will seriously consider assigning this book to help their students appreciate the true potential of fiction to stir the imagination, inform, influence and intrigue.
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am 10. Mai 2004
Etwas schwächer als seine Vorgänger, ist dies doch wieder ein sehr gelungenes Buch mit schier unwahrscheinlichen Wendungen, auch wenn am Schluss alles aufgeht. Der Ideenreichtum ist umwerfend und der blosse Gedanke, dass Bücher auf eine so aberwitzige Art geschrieben werden könnten, treibt einem die Lachtränen in die Augen. Da freut man sich schon auf Teil 4!
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am 14. März 2004
Vorab vielleicht der Hinweis, dass es sich hierbei um den inzwischen dritten Teil der Thursday Next Serie von Jasper Fforde handelt. Wenngleich die Bücher in sich abgeschlossen sind, so fließt ein großer Teil der Story über die Bände hinweg. Den Einstieg nicht bei Band eins ("Der Fall Jane Eyre"/"The Eyre Affair") zu suchen dürfte daher sehr schwierig und jedenfalls frustrierend werden.
Wenn Sie also hier weiterlesen, so kennen Sie wahrscheinlich den ersten und den zweiten Band und ich kann mich auf dieses Buch konzentrieren ohne Background zu geben. Im Unterschied zu den ersten beiden Bänden spielt dieser Band praktisch ausschließlich in der Welt der Fiktion. Hier an der Quelle der Literaturentstehung macht der Leser jetzt erstaunliche Entdeckungen darüber was in "Wirklichkeit" in den Büchern vorgeht. Hier liegen die Bücher im Wettstreit den "Buchoscar" zu gewinnen. Figuren werden neu geschaffen und entwickeln sich um in neuen Werken eingesetzt werden zu können. Unfertige und unveröffentlichte Romane werden durch deren Protagonisten vorangetrieben um nicht im Textsee aufgelöst zu werden, dazu sind auch am Schwarzmarkt beschaffte Plots aus anderen Büchern ein Mittel der Wahl. Fforde erschafft eine völlig neue Welt, die er in vielen Details erzählt. Die Story dieses Romans ist an sich relativ dünn, da viel Zeit auf Beschreibungen aufgeht. Diese Beschreibungen jedoch sind in zahlreiche interessante und vor allem witzige Nebengeschichten verpackt. Der zentrale Plot handelt vom Versuch ein neues Buchbetriebssystem zu veröffentlichen, dahinter jedoch steckt mehr als eine Verbesserung. Vielmehr versucht ein kleiner Kreis mit dem neuen System Macht und Einfluss an sich zu reißen. Thursday mittlerweile in Diensten der Literaturpolizei JurisFiction ist wieder gefordert die Welt zu retten.
Sprachlich knüpft das Werk direkt an seine Vorgänger an und kann daher durchaus als gelungen bezeichnet werden. Die vielen kleinen Anspielungen auf andere Bücher finden sich ebenfalls wieder und sind weiterhin das Salz in der Suppe.
Meine Empfehlung: Wer die ersten beiden Bände gemocht hat, kann sich zuversichtlich auch den Dritten Band vornehmen. Sind Ihnen im Verlauf der ersten beiden Bände Zweifel gekommen ob das wirklich "Ihre" Art von Literatur ist, dann werden diese Zweifel während des Lesens dieses Romans weiter anwachsen.
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am 11. Januar 2007
Wie die vorherigen Thursday Next-Bücher ist dies eine herrliche Mischung aus sprachlichem und anspielungsreich literarischem Witz und Motiven aus Fantasy und Krimi. Fforde hat dabei mit großem Geschick nicht nur eine plastische Hauptfigur geschaffen, sondern haucht auch einer Reihe von interessanten Nebenfiguren überzeugend Leben ein.

Wer zum ersten Mal auf Werke von Fforde stößt, sollte aber lieber mit dem ersten Band der Serie beginnen, The Jane Eyre Affair. In The Well of Lost Plots taucht Next noch erheblich tiefer in die Welt der Fiktion ein, auf der Suche nach einem Mittel, ihren ausgelöschten Mann wiederzufinden und auf der Flucht vor der mächtigen Goliath-Corporation. Mit Miss Havisham aus Dickens' Great Expectations hat sie aber eine Mentorin, die ihr im rechten Augenblick zur Seite steht, sei es im Kampf gegen 'Grammasites', sei es auf der Suche nach dem ausgebrochenen Minotaurus. Klingt seltsam als Inhaltsangabe? Ist es! Aber macht einen Heidenspaß!
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am 9. März 2014
Wer gerne Fantasy und auch die Klassiker der englischen Literatur liest, sollte sich diese Bücherreihe nicht entgehen lassen (1. Teil: The Eyre Affair). Den Inhalt beschreibe ich nicht - der ist unbeschreiblich :-). Nur soviel sei gesagt, die Geschichte spielt in unserer Gegenwart, allerdings in einer Welt, in der Kunst - und hier vor allem Literatur - sehr ernst genommen wird und sozusagen lebensnotwendig ist. Dadurch ergeben sich die tollsten Fälle für Literatur-Polizei, allen voran Thursday Next, die mit ihrer sicheren Spürnase und manchmal auch mit Hilfe ihres Vaters, der durch die Zeit reisen kann, den Kunst-Verbrechern auf den Fersen ist.

Definitiv kein Buch für jemand, der nur realistische Geschichten mag. Man muss sich einfach auf den Handlungsstrang einlassen, denn es ist eine total abgedrehte Geschichte, sehr fesselnd.
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