Hier klicken MSS Öle & Betriebsstoffe für Ihr Auto Jetzt informieren Blind-Date mit Audible Cloud Drive Photos UHD TVs Learn More TDZ Hier klicken Mehr dazu Fire Shop Kindle Ghostsitter longss17

Kundenrezensionen

4,2 von 5 Sternen
55
4,2 von 5 Sternen
Format: Taschenbuch|Ändern
Preis:9,79 €+ Kostenfreie Lieferung mit Amazon Prime
Ihre Bewertung(Löschen)Ihre Bewertung


Derzeit tritt ein Problem beim Filtern der Rezensionen auf. Bitte versuchen Sie es später noch einmal.

am 12. März 2013
Das Buch war mit dem Prädikat "guter Zustand" angeboten worden. Das stellte sich jedoch als falsch heraus. Es war ziemlich abgenutzt und insgesamt in einem Zustand, in dem man es nicht mehr zum Verkauf anbieten sollte. Die Person, derich es geschenkt habe, hat sich regelrecht geektelt und es nicht angerührt, sondern gleich in den Müll geworfen. Solche Bücher sollten von Amazon nicht angeboten werden.
0Kommentar|War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 3. Februar 2006
Reverend Stephen Kumalo lives with his wife in a remote village, Ndotsheni, where he is a respected umfundisi. His sister Gertrude, his brother John and his son Absalom have all gone to live to Johannesburg. One day The reverend receives a letter from Theophilus Msimangu urging him to come to Johannesburg because Gertrude is very sick.
And so begins Stephen's long descent from the mountains to the capital which almost resembles a descent into Hell. Indeed, he is to discover that Gertrude is a prostitute and liquor seller who doesn't care about her young daughter, that John is a politician fighting against the white leadership and that Absalom has murdered a white man.
Mr Paton admirably portrays all the contradictions which the people of South Africa endured in the 1950s. And he does so through the eyes of a forlorn old man who tries to make sense of the way the members of his family behave. The author's humanity, compassion, generosity and wisdom are apparent in every sentence he writes and his novel shows with sensitivity the complex social and racial issues in a country where so many had to suffer for so long.
0Kommentar| 6 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 19. August 2004
Alan Patons Roman "Denn sie sollen getröstet werden" ist ein tröstliches buch, das von echtem und tiefem menschlichen Verstehen kündet. Ohne Einseitigkeit und Parteilichkeit, doch mit einer magischen Kraft des Ausdrucks, der sich zu fast biblischer tonart sublimiert, erzählt Alan Paton von der tragischen Schuldverstrickung schwarzer und weißer Menschen und der versöhnenden, über Rassenschranken hinwegreichenden christlichen Bruderliebe.
Es gelingt dem großen Erzähler Alan Paton, der sich mit seiner südafrikanischen heimat zutiefst verbunden fühlt, die Grundsütze christlicher Lebenshaltung von der ihnen durch die Rassenfrage drohenden Erstarrung zu lösen und sie durch die verwandelnde Kraft schöpferischer Liebe neu zu beleben. Alles in allem hat Alan Paton ein Werk geschaffen, dessen Geist wegweisend für die Zukunft sein kann.
0Kommentar| 5 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 26. Februar 2010
Alan Patons Roman "Denn sie sollen getröstet werden" ist ein tröstliches Buch,
das von echtem und tiefem menschlichen Verstehen kündet.
Ohne Einseitigkeit und Parteilichkeit, doch mit einer magischen Kraft des Ausdrucks,
der sich zu fast biblischer tonart sublimiert, erzählt Alan Paton von der tragischen Schuldverstrickung schwarzer und weißer Menschen und der versöhnenden, über Rassenschranken hinwegreichenden christlichen Bruderliebe.
Es gelingt dem großen Erzähler Alan Paton, der sich mit seiner südafrikanischen Heimat zutiefst verbunden fühlt, die Grundsütze christlicher Lebenshaltung von der ihnen durch die Rassenfrage drohenden Erstarrung zu lösen und sie durch die verwandelnde Kraft schöpferischer Liebe neu zu beleben.
Alles in allem hat Alan Paton ein Werk geschaffen, dessen Geist wegweisend
für die Zukunft sein kann.
review image
0Kommentar| Eine Person fand diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 19. August 2004
Alan Patons Roman "Denn sie sollen getröstet werden" ist ein tröstliches buch, das von echtem und tiefem menschlichen Verstehen kündet. Ohne Einseitigkeit und Parteilichkeit, doch mit einer magischen Kraft des Ausdrucks, der sich zu fast biblischer tonart sublimiert, erzählt Alan Paton von der tragischen Schuldverstrickung schwarzer und weißer Menschen und der versöhnenden, über Rassenschranken hinwegreichenden christlichen Bruderliebe.
Es gelingt dem großen Erzähler Alan Paton, der sich mit seiner südafrikanischen heimat zutiefst verbunden fühlt, die Grundsütze christlicher Lebenshaltung von der ihnen durch die Rassenfrage drohenden Erstarrung zu lösen und sie durch die verwandelnde Kraft schöpferischer Liebe neu zu beleben. Alles in allem hat Alan Paton ein Werk geschaffen, dessen Geist wegweisend für die Zukunft sein kann.
0Kommentar| 3 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 18. Mai 2000
Cry the beloved Country, By Alan Paton, is a beautifullly written story of the conflict in South Africa in the 20th century. Its the story of a Zulu priest named Stephen Kumalo, who leaves his village to go and return his sister from the city. Yet, when he gets there, nothing is the way that he imagined it. The story is completely descriptive, and told so that you completely emphathize with Kumalo, and the problems that he is going through. You see his anguish at the fates of his son and his sister, the sadness and growing awareness that his country is being torn apart, and the knowledge that he is almost powerless against it. You see it from the other side as well, the side of James Jarvis, the father of the man that Kumalo's son murdered. You see him comes to terms with his sons death, and his changing views on the plight of his country. YOu watch his help Kumalo. In all, although slightly saddening, the story is moving and beautiful, and totally worth reading. If not for the value of the story alone, but for everything that it pertains to. Cry the Beloved country is wonderful.
0Kommentar| Eine Person fand diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 12. März 2000
How on Earth could *anyone* think this book is boring? (I have always doubted others' insistence that our culture has been turned by television and computers into a short-attention-span travesty, but now I am reconsidering that skepticism.) If this book is boring, a speech by Martin Luther King is boring. A beautiful day at the beach, or on a mountain, is boring. A beautiful woman is--boring. And frankly, if you think those things are boring, I have little use for your opinion.
More pertinently, there is so much about this book that is so moving, and what is moving is exciting by definition (at least in MY opinion). The universality of Paton's dialogues, the way he shifts so effortlessly from present to past tense to convey tension and emotion, his command of the Zulu culture and of the history and terror of his native land--all of these factors are simply astounding. This is a book people will read three centuries from now--and it will be just as exciting then.
0Kommentar| Eine Person fand diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 5. Juli 1998
I am an 18 year old student who just graduted from high school. I hardly sit down and finish a book because I wasn't interested. However, from the page one of the book, I was hooked on. I can't stop reading. This book is very beautifully written. I feel that Part I on the book is from Stephen Kumalo's point of view of Johnnesburg. Part II is James Jarvis's point of view of Jhnnesbur. Part III, Alan Payton combined their two different point of views and make a conclusion. There are a lot of great quotes in this book that we can use in our daily life. I really encourage all of you to read this book
0Kommentar| Eine Person fand diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 2. April 2000
For me, this book had a slow start as I tried to get into the rhythm of the writing and grasp where the story was going. I was reading it for my book club, and for the first 50 pages or so, wasn't too happy about it. BUT THEN, something shifted and I was completely immersed in it. I must admit (sadly) to not knowing a lot about the history of South Africa, so I'm sure I didn't appreciate that aspect of the story as much as I could have. I will now learn more and reread the book so that I can experience that side of it fully. But, the story of what the father, Stephen Kumalo, experienced moved me to tears on several occasions. Reading from a parent's perspective, I could emotionally and physically feel what that man must have been experiencing- Paton's writing is amazing. This book is so sad and sweet and touching. There is much to say about all of the other aspects and story lines of this novel- all good. I was so tempted to stop reading at the beginning, and if I hadn't been reading it for the book club discussion, I believe I would have. I am so thankful that I didn't quit- I would have missed out on one of the most beautiful, rich, heart-rending, inspiring, and wonderful books I have ever read. I recommend it completely.
0Kommentar|War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 4. Juni 2000
There is a lovely road that runs from Ixopo into the hills. So starts this book, a portrayel of one South African man's struggle to reunite his family. Kumalo is a black man who lives in South Africa in the 1940's admist Aparthied. His goal is to bring back his sister and son back to him. Alan Paton does an excellent job showing the obvious difference between a life of a black and white. Skin color was everything at that time. He displays the awful townships that blacks must live in because they have no other place to go. He also shows how mistreatment of blacks was a daily routine. As only a seventh grade student, I have to admit that at times I was sometimes confused while reading. However, the true meaning of this book was obvious. South Africa has gone through a tragic life. This book gives such an in depth gripping example of a black man's life that it is hard not to believe that it isn't an autobiography. This book displays the racial injustice of the law, by showing the sentence against Absalom. It's a true-eyeopener of the cruel history of our world, and what we have done to it. This wonderful book is one that should be read.
0Kommentar|War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden