find Öle & Betriebsstoffe für Ihr Auto Jetzt informieren PR CR0917 Cloud Drive Photos UHD TVs Learn More TDZ Hier klicken Mehr dazu Hier Klicken Storyteller AmazonMusicUnlimited AmazonMusicUnlimited Fußball longSSs17
Profil für Adam Shah > Rezensionen

Persönliches Profil

Beiträge von Adam Shah
Top-Rezensenten Rang: 7.226.166
Hilfreiche Bewertungen: 5

Richtlinien: Erfahren Sie mehr über die Regeln für "Meine Seite@Amazon.de".

Rezensionen verfasst von
Adam Shah (Washington, DC)
(REAL NAME)   

Anzeigen:  
Seite: 1
pixel
Children of Dune
Children of Dune
von Frank Herbert
  Taschenbuch
Preis: EUR 9,49

3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Herbert's Third Installment of his Incredible Series, 3. Juni 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Children of Dune (Taschenbuch)
Children of Dune, the third book of Frank Herbert's series, while not one of the best of the series is certainly an interesting continuation of the Dune chronicle. In this book, the twin children of Paul Maud'Dib Atreides, hero of the first two books of the series must contend with the continued upheaval in the galaxy caused by their father's violent ascent to the imperial throne.
The background for this book is complex: The fallout from Paul's takeover is massive. Paul's ascent to the throne, while possibly the least evil course for humanity given the corruption and stagnation in the human race until his takeover, unleashed a bloody jihad on the galaxy. Paul's original followers, the desert-bred and half wild Fremen have become the leaders of the jihad. As army officers, they are still great warriors; however, they have lost much of their mysticism and their wildness. As a result, some of the Fremen have turned against Paul, as originally explored in the previous book, Dune Messiah. On top of this, Paul's death in the previous book has left only his two young children to rule. Given their youth, the galaxy is being run in their name by their increasingly corrupt and insane aunt, the Abomination Alia, possibly in league with their grandmother who may also be a traitor to them and their step-mother Irulan.
As a result of all this, the book focuses on the children's attempts to take control of the empire and save it from those who will destroy the entire galaxy. Furthermore, they must find a way to take control of the empire while avoiding the mistakes of their father, Paul, who unleashed the violent jihad on the galaxy, allowed himself to be set up as a Messiah and became so addicted to the Spice melange which allowed him to see the future that he became unable to act except as dictated by his visions.
The children strike on a horrifying method to take over the galaxy but avoid the temptation of doing so by foreseeing the future exactly. I will not reveal their method because one of the best parts of the book is the way their method unfolds, twisting and turning until the final horror is revealed. The book is worth reading just to have that revelation.
Another interesting aspect of this book is the fact that for the only time in the Dune series, Herbert's main characters are young children. Although they have collected wisdom greater than anyone else in the galaxy, except possibly their aunt Alia due to their parentage, Herbert is still able to deal with them as children. Herbert shows his deftness as an author, not simply as a sci-fi writer.
The only flaw with this book is that it is significantly less mystical than the prior books. Although the result of the path chosen by the children is very mystical, as revealed in the next book, this book primarily deals with plot rather than Herbert's amazing insights into humanity and religion.


Dune Messiah
Dune Messiah
von Frank Herbert
  Taschenbuch
Preis: EUR 7,99

1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen A Competent Sequel, 1. Juni 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Dune Messiah (Taschenbuch)
This is the second book of the Dune series by Frank Herbert. This book picks up soon after the end of the first book. Paul Maud'Dib Atreides, main character in the first book and now emperor of the galaxy, has to deal with the results of the jihad he reluctantly released on the galaxy as well as the threats to his power from within his own palace. This book is more introspective than the first book, lacking most of the action and focusing instead on the foibles of the various characters and Herbert's musings on religion and politics.
This book makes even more clear than the first book that Paul is not actually a hero, but a flawed man trying to cope with the enormity of his own power and the terrible bloodshed that is being committed in his name. The book is an essay on the dangers of absolute power and of the combination of religious and political power.
Dune Messiah is also a story of the danger of a ruler becoming disaffected from those closest to him. The greatest danger to Paul comes from his disaffected wife. Paul also cuts off his beloved concubine from his decision-making and instead chooses a course which leads him towards personal destruction to save the galaxy. Perhaps Herbert's real message here is that domestic bliss is the key to happiness even for the all-powerful.
Although this book is interesting, it is mainly filler between the masterpiece of Dune and the very good Children of Dune.


Dune
Dune
von Frank Herbert
  Taschenbuch
Preis: EUR 8,99

1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A Powerful Beginning To One of the Best Sci-fi Series, 1. Juni 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Dune (Taschenbuch)
Dune is Frank Herbert's masterpiece about Paul Maud'Dib Atreides, descendants of the House Atreus of Homeric fame, and his battles with his arch-enemies, the Harkonnens and, eventually, with the combined forces of the galaxy. The first of six books in an unfinished series--Herbert died before he brought his series to a conclusion--this book is the best of the series.
Set far in the future, after humanity has not only left Earth, but humanity's origin is probably forgotten, the setting for this book is a neo-medieval world of strict castes, nobility and civilized warfare. The basic plot is rather standard: the young hero, Paul must come of age quickly when his father is treacherously killed by agents of the hated rivals. Since Paul loses his rightful throne, he must come of age among the violent indigenous population known as the Fremen.
Although Herbert does write the action scenes well, the plot is not the strong suit of the book--later books in the series have better plots. The strongest part of the book is the theme of religion and politics that runs through the book. Herbert combines many different religions in this future galaxy including Christianity, Islam and various eastern religions.
Herbert sets his hero, Paul, up as a messiah to the planetary population, the Fremen and possibly to the entire galaxy. This path may ultimately lead to a bloody jihad. However, Paul realizes that being a messiah is a dangerous path to take, ultimately ruinous to humanity as later books show. However, Paul's desire for power and the evilness of the alternate leaders, the corrupted by power emperor, the overly secretive female priesthood named the Bene Geserit, the no longer human Guild, and the entirely evil Harkonnens force Paul at every fork in the road to choose the path that leads to his anointing as messiah. Herbert thus creates a hero who is not as virtuous as he seems at first glance.
A final note: as with any good first book in a sci-fi/fantasy series, there is much that remains unexplained in this book. Anyone who says that they understand the entire book is either lying or missed something. Some of the mysteries in this book become explained in later books, and one--the reference to Richese--in the prequel recently co-written by Herbert's son. There is also a great deal of mysticism and musing on the general state of humanity, some of which was, frankly, over my head.
Therefore, if mysticism and unexplained mystery are not your cup of tea, then you should skip this book.


Wizard and Glass: Dark Tower IV
Wizard and Glass: Dark Tower IV
von Stephen King
  Taschenbuch

3.0 von 5 Sternen Good But Worse Than Its Predecessors, 31. Mai 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Wizard and Glass: Dark Tower IV (Taschenbuch)
This is the fourth installment of Steven King's fantasy series, The Dark Tower, which follows the story of the Gunslinger Roland, the equivalent of an Arthurian knight in the world King has created, and his quest to reach the Dark Tower in order to make his world (and possibly ours) right again.
This installment relates the conclusion of Roland's and his companions' confrontation with the mad monorail began in the previous installment of the series, The Wastelands, and then goes back to the earlier story of Roland's coming of age, also begun in previous installments. The conclusion of the mad monorail story is suspenseful and exciting. The continued insights into Roland's world and the connection to ours is as interesting as ever. The confrontation between Roland and the forces of Randall Flagg, the arch-villain in Steven King's classic, The Stand, is also well-done and King shows again that he is a great action writer.
Unfortunately, the main part of the book, a love story between a young Roland and a fair maiden, Susan Delgado, is possibly the weakest element of the Dark Tower saga to date. Love stories are not King's strong suit. In addition, King tells us in his introduction that he began writing the story of Roland's youth while working on an earlier volume in the series but cut it out when he got stuck at a certain point. Perhaps the time between starting the story and finishing it hurt the story.
On the whole, however, this is still a good book and set us up well for the concluding volume(s) which King promises are forthcoming. Therefore, I recommend reading this book despite the weakness of the love story.


The Drawing of the Three (Dark Tower, Band 2)
The Drawing of the Three (Dark Tower, Band 2)
von Stephen King
  Taschenbuch
Preis: EUR 7,27

4.0 von 5 Sternen A Good Follow-Up to the Gunslinger, 31. Mai 2000
This is the second installment of Steven King's fantasy series, The Dark Tower, which follows the story of the Gunslinger Roland, the equivalent of an Arthurian knight in the world King has created, and his quest to reach the Dark Tower in order to make his world (and possibly ours) right again.
This installment tells the story of the gathering of Roland's companions on his quest. The term "drawing" refers to the act of taking people from our world to Roland's dying world. Roland does not get to choose which people to "draw", but rather must draw the people chosen for him in an unknown manner. Unlike the other three installments in this series, we do not learn much about Roland's world in this book, a disappointment given how interesting Roland's world is and how good King is at describing that world. Instead, we get to see our world through Roland's eyes. Since Roland's world is, in many ways, a medieval world, his view is akin to the one we would get from a time traveler from several centuries ago. For example, Roland is particularly taken by a pharmacy in which the potions and elixirs non-existent or rare in his world are casually sold with a doctor's note in our world.
Since the process of drawing also requires Roland to enter the minds of the people he draws, we gain unique insight for a book written in third person into the minds of Roland's companions which aids us in understanding the characters in later volumes. Furthermore, this allows King to engage in something akin to stream of consciousness as we see into the minds of Roland's companions. Although King is, of course, no Faulkner, it should be noted that two of the characters Roland enters are mentally disturbed and therefore, as in The Sound and the Fury, King competently describes the thoughts of characters with minds totally alien from our own.
Finally, for those who are fans of action and therefore were not enamoured by The Gunslinger, this book will not disappoint you. This book is chock full of action, including shoot outs with cops, races against time to save characters from death and eerie, intelligent animals called lobstrosities who are almost as scary as some of King's evil characters in his horror books. Thus, even if you disliked The Gunslinger, read this book. You might even decide to re-read The Gunslinger after this book gets you excited by the series.


The Gunslinger (Dark Tower)
The Gunslinger (Dark Tower)
von Stephen King
  Taschenbuch

4.0 von 5 Sternen A Well-Done Introduction To Another World, 31. Mai 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Gunslinger (Dark Tower) (Taschenbuch)
This is the first installment of Steven King's fantasy series, The Dark Tower, which follows the story of the Gunslinger Roland, the equivalent of an Arthurian knight in the world King has created, and his quest to reach the Dark Tower in order to make the world right again.
This installment tells the story of Roland's search for a mysterious stranger who may be able to help Roland find the Dark Tower. It is long on atmosphere and short on action. Therefore, fans of Steven King's horror works will find this book a distinct change of pace. However, the book will not disappoint you if you try it, especially if you are a fan of fantasy series such as the Lord of the Rings. Furthermore, you will find in later books that elements of King's horror world also exist in Roland's world, and therefore, to have a full understanding of King's horror villains, you have to read this series.
The Gunslinger offers several intriguing views of Roland's dying world. The book is not devoid of action; there is a dramatic shoot out for shadowy reasons which one hopes will be better explained in the concluding volumes of the work. There is a lost child who provides the first direct evidence that Roland's world is connected to our own, and there is the introduction to Roland himself, a man who is capable of fantastic violence but still comes across as human and quite possibly kind (a fact which becomes more clear in later books).
I recommend this book most highly to anyone who enjoys stories involving quests such as Arthurian legends, the Chronicles of Prydain and the Hobbit and Lord of the Rings.


Hannibal
Hannibal
von Thomas Harris
  Gebundene Ausgabe

1.0 von 5 Sternen A Waste of Harris's Talent, 30. Mai 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Hannibal (Gebundene Ausgabe)
To echo the sentiments of many previous reviewers, Hannibal was one of the most disappointing books I have ever read, given Harris's previous masterpieces, Silence of the Lambs and Red Dragon. The book fails in three unforgivable ways: (1) Harris makes Clarisse Starling (Jodie Foster for those who have seen but not read Silence of the Lambs) act totally out of character; (2) Harris inexplicably gives us the reasons why Hannibal Lechter became insane; and (3) the plot is boring. Since many other reviewers have also expressed the same disgust for Starling and since a detailed description would involve ruining the book's conclusion, I will not go into that failure further, but refer readers to previous reviews. The second failure of this book, Harris's explanation of Hannibal's insanity is terrible because it takes the scariness away from the series. The Hannibal Lechter series worked in the first few books in large part because of the incredibly frightening thought that an extraordinarily intelligent, witty, well-educated professional is also, inexplicably, a monster of unspeakable proportions. In this book, Harris is turned into a run-of-the-mill maniac whose past explains his present actions. Instead of the psychological fear we had of Lechter, the only scary things in this book is the violence wrought by Hannibal. This is even more unforgivable because Harris shows us how wonderful a writer he can be when he describes Hannibal's intelligence, as opposed to his insanity. The description of Hannibal's intelligence is beautiful, imaginative and intriguing, while the description of how Hannibal became insane is dull. Which brings us to my last criticism: the book as a whole is boring. Although the violence scenes are well-written, the main plot, having to do with the search for Hannibal by the Clarisse and the authorities and by a former victim of Hannibal bent on revenge is uninteresting and shows off none of Harris's considerable abilities as a writer. Finally, because of Harris's decision to devote so much time to the horrible ending involving Clarisse's startling metamorphosis, Harris gives short shrift to the plot, having it come to a climax before the plot even has a chance to become interesting. Therefore, I suggest you skip this book and hope that Harris's next book is better.


Equus (Plays, Penguin)
Equus (Plays, Penguin)
von Peter Shaffer
  Taschenbuch

4.0 von 5 Sternen A Powerful Play, 30. Mai 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Equus (Plays, Penguin) (Taschenbuch)
Equus is a powerful play dealing with a myriad of issues including psychiatry, love, crime, insanity and family in a compact and readable manner. Even though the play deals with so many complex issues, it is eminently readable, one might even say a page-turner. A final note of interest: the playwright tells us in his introduction that the plot of the play came from a newspaper headline he saw describing a particularly bizarre crime. Although the author never learned anything more about the crime, the headline sparked his imagination. The play, therefore, also serves as an intriguing study of the playwright's own imagination.


Seite: 1