Jeans Store Hier klicken b2s Cloud Drive Photos Erste Wahl Learn More sommer2016 HI_PROJECT Hier klicken Fire Shop Kindle PrimeMusic Summer Sale 16
Profil für Bernhard > Rezensionen

Persönliches Profil

Beiträge von Bernhard
Top-Rezensenten Rang: 100.733
Hilfreiche Bewertungen: 42

Richtlinien: Erfahren Sie mehr über die Regeln für "Meine Seite@Amazon.de".

Rezensionen verfasst von
Bernhard "bernhardgeiger"

Anzeigen:  
Seite: 1 | 2
pixel
Free Will: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions)
Free Will: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions)
von Thomas Pink
  Taschenbuch
Preis: EUR 10,60

2.0 von 5 Sternen Hard to read, no account of neuroscience, weak arguments, 6. Juli 2016
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
When I bought this Very Short Introduction, I was expecting an easily readable, neutral summary of the free will problem, its history, and traditional as well as modern proposed solutions. If you, too, are looking for such a treatment, then this book may disappoint you as much as it disappointed me.

Pink indeed discusses several possible positions, including the medieval free will problem, deterministic incompatibilism, libertarianism, Hobbesian compatibilism, etc., but does so without appreciation. He does not neutrally list the pros and cons of every viewpoint, but rather tries to make every viewpoint sound ridiculous that is not his own. That would be acceptable were his arguments strong enough, but they are not. Basically, he argues for libertarian freedom mostly because we have a "widely shared idea of freedom", that is as vivid as our perception of, say, an external objective world. So "why be selectively sceptical of one [...] and not the other?" He also argues that "freedom seems to be limited to humans", or at most including higher animals - a very strong, unconvincing claim. Finally, he does not take into account what neuroscience has to say to this problem, even though first results about the readiness potential have been already presented 20 years before the publication of this book. That being bad enough, his writing is quite "philosophical", and thus not very accessible to a layman. Here's a specimen:

"[A] decision is an action with a goal. A decision is an exercise of rationality that is directed at its object, the voluntary action decided upon, as a goal - a goal which that exercise of rationality is to attain or effect - and that makes a decision an intentional goal-directed action, an action whose rationality depends on the likelihood of its effecting that attainment. [...] A decision is a motivation with an object. A decision is a decision to do something. But a decision is not an ordinary motivation. It is quite different from an ordinary desire. And that is because a decision's relation to its object is that of an action to its object. The decision is related to its object - to what the decision is a decision to do - as to a goal that the decision is supposed to attain."


Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies
Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies
von Nick Bostrom
  Taschenbuch
Preis: EUR 9,99

2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen A very interesting book, and an important one - but it could have been written a bit better., 22. Mai 2016
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
It might not be the most pleasurable read, but sticking with it till the end is worth its while. The book has a great logical structure, and most chapters end with a summary - that's exactly how such a book should be written. Other than this, it is hard to give a general critique, since many chapters are extremely well-written:

The first chapter treats past developments and the state of the art in AI research. Well written, but lacking important aspects of current AI-related research: Scientific progress in all areas of machine learning was not mentioned in sufficient detail; clustering, policy development via dynamic programming, classification, natural language processing, etc. Which of these special-purpose skills are important ingredients for an AGI, and which are problems that are AI-complete? I would have appreciated a bit more on that topic.

The second chapter, "Paths to superintelligence" outlines several possible ways to get there, but is not very convincing in which of these seems to be likely. The reader is well-informed, but left in a state of "OK, but Bostrom himself seems not to believe that any of them is likely to achieve superintelligence in the next 50 years." Slightly connected, but much better written, chapter 3 deals with different forms of superintelligence.

The fourth chapter deals with the "kinetics of an intelligence explosion", and is again very vague: Both accelerating and decelerating effects (nicely matched with all possible paths to superintelligence) are discussed at lengths, and again the reader is left with the feeling that absolutely no prognosis is possible. Bostrom himself end the chapter with "although a fast or medium [speed] takeoff looks more likely, the possibility of a slow takeoff cannot be excluded".

Chapter 5 marks a transition in the writing style: Bostrom changes from a very neutral, unconfident tone to a highly convincing one. If I had to guess, I would say that this and the following chapters are at the core of his own research interest. Bostrom makes a very convincing point that as soon as a superintelligence is created, it will very likely take control over the world. Chapter 6 briefly deals with possible (super-)capabilities such a superintelligence will develop and how it can use them to take over control.

Chapter 7 contains the important orthogonality hypothesis, i.e., that there is no reason to believe that a superintelligence has high moral standards. It then discusses important instrumental goals (i.e., goals necessary to achieve to achieve the intelligence' ultimate goal, whatever that may be). Count in self-preservation and ressource acquisition, for example. The following chapter then shows that even a non-malevolent superintelligence may destroy everything dear to us or perform otherwise morally terrible actions (e.g., simulating what human people wish requires simulating human people - terminating a simulation could then easily turn out as a genocide). Both chapters are extremely well-written and captivating, an easy and convincing read. In that line of thinking, chapter 11 discusses scenarios in which not one, but multiple superintelligences come to power, a world in which humankind is a mere slave race. Opposed to the previously mentioned chapters, this one again lacks confidence and seems to paint a quite unrealistic picture.

Chapter 9 tries to illustrate possible ways to control a superintelligence, and, more importantly, illustrates how and why they will probably fail. Chapter 10 merely categorizes superintelligences via their controlled environment. Chapter 12 connects with chapter 9, assuming that the control problem is solved: How should we design and control our superintelligence? What kind of morale should we install? This chapter very nicely explains the important problem that morale is not a (mathematically) well-defined object, and that we are currently lacking an operational definition ourselves. Still, the chapter presents a few interesting ideas about how to "load" our values into the superintelligence. Chapter 13 augments this chapter by suggesting more indirect methods for the value loading problem.

Chapter 14 finally deals with "what we should do now": Should we continue researching or should we do our best to stall progress? Although several scenarios are presented, a definite conclusion escaped my attention. This then nicely summarizes my impression of chapters 2-4 and 13-14: Bostrom is jumping between pros and cons, eager to give a complete picture (which is always better than a one-sided one). Jumping around destroyed a lot of the book's effect in these topics. By mentioning something good and something bad in consecutive sentences, the book invoked a feeling of neutrality (probably more than what would have been invoked by first listing ALL pros and then ALL cons). Maybe not the best strategy in a topic where the credo should be: "Better be safe than sorry."


Auf dem Weg zur Professur: Die Postdoc-Fibel
Auf dem Weg zur Professur: Die Postdoc-Fibel
von academics GmbH
  Broschiert
Preis: EUR 16,95

1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Gute Informationsquelle fuer junge Postdocs und DissertantInnen am Ende ihrer Doktorarbeit, 13. Mai 2016
Es werden auf den wenigen Seiten alle Themen angeschnitten, die in der fruehen und spaeten Postdocphase wichtig sind: Publikation und Herausarbeitung des fachlichen Profils, die Entscheidung zwischen Habilitation, Nachwuchsgruppenleitung und Juniorprofessor, und das Bewerbungsverfahren um eine Stelle auf Lebenszeit. Zu allen Phasen werden die durchaus entscheidenden nichtwissenschaftlichen Rahmenbedingungen (Gehalt, Krankenversicherung, dienstrechtliche Stellung, etc.) kurz besprochen. Abgesehen von der (nicht nur moralisch) sehr fragwuerdigen Empfehlung, die wissenschaftlichen Arbeiten immer zuerst bei den hoechstrangigen Zeitschriften einzureichen, ist diese Fibel fuer DissertantInnen und junge Postdocs sicher zu empfehlen.


A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (Penguin Modern Classics)
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (Penguin Modern Classics)
von James Joyce
  Taschenbuch
Preis: EUR 5,99

3.0 von 5 Sternen Good, but terribly slow read., 7. April 2016
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
It's a beautiful coming-of-age story, revolving mainly about religion: A boy-child's fear of God, an innocent falling-in-love, a dogmatic education of the Jesuits, a time span full of sinful love (no graphic descriptions, though), repentance, praise of God's glory, the call to priesthood, the turning away from the call, and finally the lazy student that hides behind musings about aesthetics and freedom, that hides behind his attempts to express himself eloquently and with references to scholars, only to keep him from connecting with his former innocent love. In short: A story to which any young adolescent capable of self-reflection can relate.

A good read, beautifully written, but also difficultly written: Sentences have many sub-clauses, and the separation by punctuation not always makes clear what belongs to what. Endnotes instead of footnotes make the reading even more slow and cumbersome.


Die Philosophie der Physiker (Beck'sche Reihe)
Die Philosophie der Physiker (Beck'sche Reihe)
von Erhard Scheibe
  Taschenbuch
Preis: EUR 16,95

3.0 von 5 Sternen Nicht Fleisch, nicht Fisch, 19. Januar 2016
Interessantes Thema, die Aufbereitung ist aber verbesserungswuerdig: Die philosophischen Einstellungen der Physiker des 19. und 20. Jahrhunderts werden sehr schoen an Hand von Zitaten und Briefwechseln dargstellt - was leider fehlt, ist eine fuer den philosophisch ungebildeten Laien geeignete Interpretation. So wird z.B. Ernst Mach als Positivist ausgezeichnet, was an Hand seiner Einstellung z.B. zur Existenz bzw. Nichtexistenz von Atomen veranschaulicht wird. Allerdings wird nicht erklaert, was die grundlegenden Zuege des Positivismus sind, womit die Aussage ueber Mach ohne diese Information etwas "in der Schwebe" bleibt. Aehnlich verhaelt es sich leider, wenn von Plancks wissenschaftlichem Realismus bzw. von Schroedingers monistischem Realismus die Rede ist. Ein wenig mehr philosophisches Grundmaterial haette sicher nicht geschadet.

Auf der anderen Seite ist das Buch vermutlich auch fuer den physikalisch ungebildeten Laien nicht an allen Stellen durchschaubar. Scheibe macht sich nicht wirklich die Muehe, die begrifflichen Schwierigkeiten der Relativitaetstheorie oder der Quantenmechanik anschaulich zu erklaeren -- dieses Wissen wird einfach vorausgesetzt. Ich glaube aber, dass selbst der interessierte Laie an Schwierigkeiten stossen wird, wenn Schroedinger- und Hamilton-Gleichung miteinander verglichen werden. Gut, das kommt zwar selten vor, aber es waere jedenfalls zu vermeiden gewesen.

Somit bleibt das Buch eine interessante Lektuere fuer Leser mit philosophischer UND physikalischer Vorbildung, was den Leserkreis sehr einschraenkt. Und auch da bleibt noch ein Kritikpunkt uebrig: Der Quantentheorie sind zwar mehrere Kapitel gewidment, aber die Viele-Welten-Interpretation wird leider vollstaendig verschwiegen.


Samsung EB-F1M7FLU Li-Ion Akku für Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini (1500mAh)
Samsung EB-F1M7FLU Li-Ion Akku für Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini (1500mAh)
Preis: EUR 8,29

1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
1.0 von 5 Sternen Schlechte Qualitaet, 23. September 2015
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Der Akku war innerhalb von nur vier Monaten nicht mehr zu verwenden: Er war in der Mitte aufgeblaeht, und das Smartphone schaltete sich ab sobald die Ladeanzeige unter 50% fiel.


A First Course in Optimization Theory
A First Course in Optimization Theory
von Rangarajan K. Sundaram
  Taschenbuch
Preis: EUR 43,64

5.0 von 5 Sternen A Must-Read for Students and Professionals, 29. Mai 2015
An excellent book on optimization theory, I can recommend it without hesitation. The book starts out with introducing the problem of optimization in Euclidean spaces before delving into area which undergraduate students/high school students identify with optimization: Setting the first derivative to zero. In later chapters, the book covers constrained optimization (Langrange and Karush-Kuhn-Tucker), convex optimization, quasi-convex optimization (which is rarely covered in related books, as far as I know), parameterized optimization and dynamic programming.

One of the best chapters of this book are those on constrained optimization: The theorems of Langrange and Kuhn-Tucker are derived, together with a cook-book procedure on how to apply them, and thorough explanation why they often work and in which cases they don't. I really appreciated all results in the book being rigorously proved, not shying away from difficult mathematics -- the book contains a very generous chapter on mathematical preliminaries, making sure it is self-contained. The book also covers apparently totally unrelated topics, such as fixed-point theorems (Tarski, Brouwer) -- only to proof the existence of Nash equilibria as a corollary. Another great feature is the huge amount of short examples, illustrating why certain conditions are necessary for lemmas and theorems. Longer examples based on economics are re-used throughout the book, making an absolutely consistent picture.


Quantum und Lotus - Vom Urknall zur Erleuchtung
Quantum und Lotus - Vom Urknall zur Erleuchtung
von Matthieu Ricard
  Gebundene Ausgabe

7 von 7 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen Weder für Physiker noch für Buddhisten -- vielleicht für solche, die es werden wollen, 28. Mai 2015
Der Start war schonmal schlecht: Der Buddhist scheint verbittert ("Viele kluge Köpfe diskutieren zwar ununterbrochen über ethische Fragen, doch hast dies keinerlei Auswirkungen mehr, vor allem nicht, wenn die Interessen der Politik oder die sakrosankten Imperative des Marktes bedroht sind") und der Physiker ist Kreationist (wenn auch in einem etwas abgeschwächten Sinn). Diese Aspekte beeinflussen natürlich den Verlauf des Buchs, und man muss sich darauf einstellen dass viele Meinungen ausgetauscht werden, die weder durch die Wissenschaft noch (soweit ich weiß) durch den Buddhismus gestützt werden. Zudem sind die wissenschaftlichen Informationen im Buch übersimplifiziert und teilweise falsch, und die buddhistischen Themen werden nur sehr oberflächlich behandelt. Konkret:

- Es wird von 16 Quarks gesprochen, meines Wissens nach gibt es nur sechs (das könnte ein Transkriptionsfehler aus dem französischen sein; six vs. seize).
- Es wird behauptet, dass makroskopische Objekte nicht der Heisenbergschen Unschärferelation unterworfen sind.
- Es wird behauptet, dass sich das Foucaultsche Pendel perfekt nach den entferntesten Galaxien ausrichtet.
- Die Viele-Welten-Interpretation wird vom Physiker mit dem Argument abgeschmettert, dass "sich unsere Person und unser Bewusstsein nicht ununterbrochen in zahllose Kopien aufspalten kann, ohne dass wir davon etwas bemerken".

Damit ist die erste Hälfte des Buchs, die sich mit Fragen der Physik beschäftigt, leider nicht ganz einwandfrei. Die Verbindungen zum Buddhismus gehen nicht viel weiter als eine mehrfache Erwähnung der gegenseitigen Abhängigkeit und der Leerheit, Argumente die durchaus von der Quantenphysik gestützt werden.

Die zweite Hälfte des Buchs, die sich mit dem menschlichen Bewusstsein beschäftigt, beginnt sehr interessant und wirft viele schöne Gedankengänge auf. In dem eingeschobenen Kapitel über künstliche Intelligenz bezeugen die Gesprächspartner aber wieder ihr Unwissen bzw. ihre Gefangenschaft in ihren eigenen Vorstellungen: Sie können sich nicht vorstellen, warum unbelebte Materie sich die grundlegenden Fragen des Lebens stellen solle, also könne ein Roboter niemals ein Bewusstsein entwickeln.

Fazit: Wer sich bereits ein bisschen mit Quantenphysik und Buddhismus beschäftigt hat, wird mit diesem Buch nicht sehr glücklich. Für einen Neuling könnte es zumindest einige interessante Denkanstöße liefern.


Die Parkinsonsche Krankheit. Ursachen und Behandlungsformen (Beck'sche Reihe)
Die Parkinsonsche Krankheit. Ursachen und Behandlungsformen (Beck'sche Reihe)
von Gerd A. Fuchs
  Taschenbuch
Preis: EUR 8,95

4.0 von 5 Sternen Empfehlenswert für Erkrankte und Angehörige, 5. Mai 2015
Obwohl das Buch bereits 2002 veröffentlicht wurde, ist der Großteil der Informationen noch aktuell: Sowohl Symptombeschreibungen und Erklärungen zu Ursachenhypothesen, als auch mögliche Diagnose- und Behandlungsmethoden entsprechen weitgehend dem aktuellen Stand (lt. Vergleich mit Wikipedia).

Besonders hervorzuheben ist, dass das Buch einen großen Fokus auf die psychische Komponente der Parkinsonschen Krankheit legt. Es vermittelt nachvollziehbar wie PatientInnen nicht nur körperlich, sondern auch seelisch an der Erkrankung leiden und stärt somit das Mitgefühl für diese. Sozusagen zwischen den Zeilen erhält man so Handlungsvorschläge für den Umgang mit Erkrankten (was die Lektüre eines Wikipedia-Artikels sicher nicht leisten kann).


Information Theory, Evolution, and The Origin of Life
Information Theory, Evolution, and The Origin of Life
von Hubert P. Yockey
  Taschenbuch
Preis: EUR 50,92

2.0 von 5 Sternen If you want to know about Information Theory and Life, read a different book., 29. Januar 2015
One of the few books I stopped reading only halfway through: I did not have the impression that I could learn a lot from this book, but that's maybe because I have little knowledge in genetics. Another problem might be the missing clear line of flow: Yockey jumps from topic to topic, from one subjective opinion to the other, and illustrates his points on very specific examples rather than trying to paint a general picture. Finally, his boasting of his own contributions, and his disregard for many other scientists, keeps reading the book from being too enjoyable.

If you are interested in this topic, I would rather recommend "What is Life" by Erwin Schrödinger. It may not be mathematically concise and it may not be up-to-date anymore, but it gives a more general picture about entropy and life. Genetics are missing in Schrödinger's book, though, so I will keep searching.


Seite: 1 | 2