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Beiträge von James L. Grubb
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James L. Grubb "jgrubb11@cox.net" (Scottsdale, AZ)
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Sugar Busters!: Cut Sugar to Trim Fat
Sugar Busters!: Cut Sugar to Trim Fat
von H. Leighton Steward
  Gebundene Ausgabe

3.0 von 5 Sternen Cut your sugar intake to achieve optimal wellness, 3. Januar 2000
Authored by three MDs and a CEO of a Fortune 500 company who say that if you cut your sugar intake you will lose weight, lower your cholesterol, achieve optimal wellness, increase your energy and help treat diabetes and other diseases. Whew! A lot of readers have been buying off on this; the book has been on the Times best-seller list for 25 weeks. The point. Refined sugar in any significant quantity is toxic. Why? Not to mention that it dissolves teeth, sugar causes the pancreas to secrete insulin which stores fat and makes too much cholesterol. The bottom line: Lay off sugar Some of the big ideas in the book. Read labels on food you buy and go with those that have little or no added sugar. It's OK to drink red wine in moderation. Chew food well (your stomach doesn't have teeth); this has a lot to do with how you absorb it. Corn, potatoes, processed cereal, white flour are bad, beans, green veggies, peas and sweet potatoes are good as are grapefruit, tomatoes, nuts and apricots among others on the list. The book's early chapters tell perhaps more than you want to know about the physiological reasons sugar is bad for you. There is a food "good & bad" list plus a meal plan to help you change your life.


Spontaneous Healing: How to Discover and Enhance Your Body's Natural Ability to Maintain and Heal  Itself
Spontaneous Healing: How to Discover and Enhance Your Body's Natural Ability to Maintain and Heal Itself
von Andrew Weil M.D.
  Taschenbuch
Preis: EUR 14,49

3.0 von 5 Sternen Using your natural ability to heal and maintain your body, 3. Januar 2000
The idea that your body possesses natural ability to heal and maintain itself is usually not within the realm of believability for many. But this Harvard M.D. presents evidence and explains body mechanisms that can overcome life-threatening illness and pain.
A "how to" book, on the one hand, Dr. Weil also points out shortcomings of our medical system. He calls it "medical pessimism" because the end result is that often nothing more can be done. This comes about, he contends, because modem medical practice is based on the view that human beings are an assemblage of structures that can be neatly programmed. Western medicine, the Chinese, for example, believe the human organism has defensive spheres such as ~onsils, adenoids and appendix, which can be stimulated and are components of an immune system. Modem medicine, he believes, also writes off the importance of the mind, looking instead for physical causes of changes in health or illness.
A realist, Dr. Weil concedes that life is uncertain and while we don't have control over life and death, we have the ability to understand how the human organism can heal itself and this is reason enough for doctors and patients to be optimistic.
"My purpose in writing this book," he states, "is to convince more people to rely on our innate potential for maintaining health and overcoming illness but, he goes on to say, "I cannot easily give you a picture this system (I) because there is a lack of organized research (2) the human organism is complex and (3) the ability of the body to repair itself is a complex function."
The DNA healing system: Is always on call and works continuously; it diagnoses damage; removes damaged structures and replaces them; acts to neutralize injury and make corrections. The challenge is to discover how to turn the right switches to activate this process. The author maintains that the final cause of all cures is the healing system with or without outside treatment. When treatments work, they do so by activating innate healing mechanisms
You can boost the efficiency of your healing system but this does not necessarily produce immediate, noticeable change. It is a long-term investment in the future. These areas seem to be emerging from current studies of diet and health: Modify diet to reduce calories; eat a limited diet one day a week; reduce animal fats (replace with fish and soy protein); increase consumption of polyunsaturated fats found in corn, soy, sesame, safflower, olives, canola, peanut and avocado oils; eat more fruit, vegetables and whole grains such as wheat and oat bran.
Greatest threats to everyday health and well-being: Toxic overload from harmful substances in the environment including chemical fertilizers, toxins in the workplace, water we drink, air pollution. The author suggests some anti-toxin formulas: Vitamins C and E, Selenium, Beta Carotene, Ginseng, Garlic, Ginger, Green Tea, Milk Thistle, Astragalus, to name a few.
The seven strategies of successful patients: (1) Don't take "NO" for an answer. Believe there is help to be found somewhere. (2) Search for help. Ask questions; read books; go to libraries; ask for ideas, visit promising practitioners. (3) Talk to others who have been healed. (4) Form partnerships with health professionals who support your search for answers. (5) Don't hesitate to make radical lifestyle changes. (6) Regard illness as a stimulus to change (7) Remember that change is more likely to occur in a climate of self-acceptance than in one of confrontation with the universe.
This popular book suggest ways to optimize your healing system and paints this upbeat scenario of the level of good health we have a right to expect. Says Dr. Weil: "We pay little aft ention to our health when it is good. "You recover from illness and injuries heal uneventfully "Stresses of ordinary life may be annoying, but they don't derange digestion or blood pressure. "Sleep should be restful, sex enjoyable. "Aging of your body occurs gradually, allowing you to moderate your activity appropriately and live out a normal life span without discomfort. "You would not get heart disease or cancer in middle age, be crippled by arthritis in later life or lose your mind to premature senility. "This scenario is possible and worth working toward because the body wants to be healthy," says Dr. Weil.
Well worth reading if you want to live in better health whatever your age.


Ship of Gold in the Deep Blue Sea (Vintage)
Ship of Gold in the Deep Blue Sea (Vintage)
von Gary Kinder
  Taschenbuch

3.0 von 5 Sternen Fascinating true story of 1857 shipwreck off the Carolinas, 3. Januar 2000
Fascinating, well-researched story of the SS Central America, a 300-foot side-wheel steamer that sank in heavy seas in September of 1857 off the Carolina coast carrying 21 tons of gold. It's still hailed as the worst peacetime sea disaster in American history Author Kindler vividly reconstructs the harrowing details of the disaster from the eyes of passengers and crew Then he tells the even more stirring story of how, after 130 years in 8,000 feet of water, the SS CentralAmerica was salvaged. Tommy Thompson of the Columbus-America Discovery Group found her and recovered gold coins, bars, nuggets, along with steamer trunks filled with historic clothes, newspapers, books and journals sealed under water for 130 years. Life called it: "The greatest treasure ever found." The salvage effort took several years and was completed in 1989. It was a classic example of the use of scientific ingenuity to penetrate the ocean floor at 8000-foot depths.... a barn-burning story and it's all true.


Ship of Gold in the Deep Blue Sea (Vintage)
Ship of Gold in the Deep Blue Sea (Vintage)
von Gary Kinder
  Taschenbuch

3.0 von 5 Sternen Fascinating true story of 1857 shipwreck off the Carolinas, 3. Januar 2000
Fascinating, well-researched story of the SS Central America, a 300-foot side-wheel steamer that sank in heavy seas in September of 1857 off the Carolina coast carrying 21 tons of gold. It's still hailed as the worst peacetime sea disaster in American history Author Kindler vividly reconstructs the harrowing details of the disaster from the eyes of passengers and crew Then he tells the even more stirring story of how, after 130 years in 8,000 feet of water, the SS CentralAmerica was salvaged. Tommy Thompson of the Columbus-America Discovery Group found her and recovered gold coins, bars, nuggets, along with steamer trunks filled with historic clothes, newspapers, books and journals sealed under water for 130 years. Life called it: "The greatest treasure ever found." The salvage effort took several years and was completed in 1989. It was a classic example of the use of scientific ingenuity to penetrate the ocean floor at 8000-foot depths.... a barn-burning story and it's all true.


Self Renewal: The Individual and the Innovative Society
Self Renewal: The Individual and the Innovative Society
von John W. Gardner
  Taschenbuch
Preis: EUR 13,49

1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Penetrating book on what makes you tick and how to keep on, 3. Januar 2000
A deeply perceptive (short) paperback on the self-renewal of individuals and societies; why some decay and others remain innovative and creative. Now in his 90th year, Mr. Gardner continues to teach at Stanford. In clear, concise terms the author sets down the factors that produce deterioration in people and societies. He maintains they are caused mostly by failure to deal with change. The factors? He names five.
SELF-DEVELOPMENT. Not just skills, but the whole range of our own potentialities for sensing, wondering, learning, understanding and aspiring. Gardner points out that this does not happen until one gets over the odd notion that education is what goes on in school buildings and nowhere else.
SELF-KNOWLEDGE. By midlife we are accomplished fugitives from ourselves. Our lives are filled with diversions; our heads stuffed with knowledge; we are involved with people. Result: we've never taken time to probe our inner selves. We don't want to know ourselves. We don't want to depend upon ourselves. We can't stand to live with ourselves. A better way is to develop a more comfortable view of who you are. It is the true basis of inner strength.
COURAGE TO FAIL. By the time we reach middle age, we carry in our heads a long list of things we'll never try again because we tried once and failed. Mature people learn less because they are willing to risk less. There's no learning without difficulty and fumbling, but if you want to keep on learning, you must keep risking failure.
LOVE. Develop the ability to have mutually fruitful relations with others. Be capable of accepting love and giving it; of depending upon others and of being depended upon. Develop the ability to see life through another's eyes and reach out to others.
MOTIVATION. A self-renewing person is highly motivated. The author points out that motivation isn't a fuel that gets injected into your system (motivation speakers won't do it); it's partly inner energy and partly the result of the social forces in your life. Gardner makes the point that we live in an over-verbalized civilization. Words have become more real than the things they signify and we need to return to the solid earth of direct experience because we are drowning in meaningless word tonnage.
"For those who have accepted the reality of change, the need for endless learning and trying is a way of living, a way of thinking, a way of being awake and ready. "Life isn't a train ride where you choose your destination, pay your fare and settle back for a nap. "It's a cycle ride over uncertain terrain, with you in the driver's seat, constantly correcting your balance and determining the direction of progress. "It's dfficult, sometimes profoundly painful."
For those who are able to achieve self-renewal, Gardner believes they will also develop a more realistic survival view of the world: "Sensible people will understand that there will never be a time when we are not in imminent danger. Cruelty, violence, brutality will be held in leash only by unresting effort--if held in leash at all. "Sloth, indulgence, smugness, torpor begotten of ease and flabbiness begotten of security will always lurk in wait." No society will ever solve the issue of the individual versus the organization. "No society will ever discover how to become civilized without running the risk of becoming overcivilized."
This is a profoundly thoughtful, penetrating piece on what makes you tick. Well worth your time.


Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ
Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ
von Daniel Goleman
  Taschenbuch

1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Why emotional intelligence wins out over basic intelligence, 3. Januar 2000
This ground-breaking book proposes that emotional intelligence is a learned ability that is as much or more important than basic intelligence and should be part of our schooling just as reading, writing and arithmetic. The author sets out new scientific evidence showing, step-by-step, how healthy emotions and destructive emotions control our lives. Feelings often count as much as logic, and we have gone too far, says Dr. Goleman, emphasizing the purely rational, when emotions are so powerful.
All emotions are an impulse to act; the creation of instant plans for handling a life situation. Now we know in detail how emotions prepare the body for differing responses. A human being is made up of two minds according to Goleman. One thinks, and one feels; two fundamentally different ways of knowing.
The author defines emotion as "a feeling and range of propensities to act." The principal emotions are: Anger: Fury, outrage, resentment. Sadness. Grief, sorrow, cheerlessness. Fear. Anxiety, apprehension, terror. Enjoyment. Happiness, joy, delight, amusement. Love: Trust, kindness, devotion, infatuation. Surprise: Shock, amazement, astonishment. Disgust: Contempt, scorn, abhorrence. Shame: Guilt, embarrassment, remorse, humiliation.
Various emotions have various physical effects on the body. Anger, for example, causes blood to flow to the hands; strong energy for vigorous action. Fear causes blood to flow to the legs making it easier to run. Happiness is a positive emotion that provides readiness and enthusiasm. Surprise makes it easier to figure out what's going on and create a plan of action. Sadness helps adjust to a significant loss and brings a drop in energy and enthusiasm.
When emotions are out of control, the emotional mind takes over and swamps the rational mind. Emotions have a mind of their own and can hold views independent of the rational mind. Goleman names five main domains of emotional intelligence: (1) Knowing one's emotion (2) Managing emotions (3) Motivating oneself (4) Recognizing emotions in others (5) Handling relationships.
A most important emotional lesson, of course, is anger management. As a culture, we have not bothered to make sure children are taught the essentials of handling anger or resolving conflict. These and other fundamentals of emotional competence have been left to chance, says Goleman.
Surprisingly, the emotional mind is far quicker than the rational mind and springs into action without considering consequences that may prove to be mistaken or misguided. Scientific findings indicate we often cannot control emotions. What's more, the emotional mind takes its beliefs to be true, discounting evidence to the contrary. That's why it's difficult to reason with someone who is emotionally upset.
A familiar husband-wife emotional story: Wives, it seems, are the emotional managers and as such, are more likely to criticize husbands. Men are more likely to be stonewallers. Wives try to bring up and resolve disagreements. Husbands, on the other hand, are reluctant to be drawn into arguments. As a wife sees her husband withdraw from a discussion. she increases the volume and intensity of her complaint white he becomes defensive or stonewalls in return. She becomes contemptful, frustrated and angry; the husband feels more and more an innocent victim. As husbands stonewall, the wife feels completely stymied. The author calls this psychological impasse "flooding~~ and points out that flooding escalates, often going out of control.
There is ample evidence of growing emotional recklessness in the wortd, the author points out, and makes a strong case that it is critical to teach emotional competence to children as part of their education.


Don't Worry, Make Money: Spiritual & Practical Ways to Create Abundance andMore Fun in Your Life
Don't Worry, Make Money: Spiritual & Practical Ways to Create Abundance andMore Fun in Your Life
von Richard Carlson
  Gebundene Ausgabe

3.0 von 5 Sternen 100 ideas on how to live a more abundant life, 3. Januar 2000
Presented are 100 different ideas for living a more abundant life with less worry, which in turn will help you make more money. Sample chapters: Become Less Reactive and More Responsive; Surround Yourself with Experts; Ask for What You Want; Work on "Knowing" instead of "Believing;" Let Go of Fearful Thoughts; Lighten Up.
An inspiring little book you can read on the run (chapters are short). It's based on the simple premise that people have an innate capacity for happiness and when happy, we are much more competent, productive, and creative. It's a kind of roadmap of the various, often unconscious, distractions that create internal anger, depression and especially worry. When aware of these negative distractions, we are able to deal with each one more effectively and our lives are greatly improved.
Carlson, a practicing psychologist and stress consultant, makes a powerful point that we have two psychological modes most of the time: Reactive and responsive. The reactive mindset impairs our judgement and decision -making; we are overly critical and negative. The responsive state of mind is relaxed; we see the big picture; we are flexible, calm and at our best. Your level of success is a direct relationship with the amount of time you spend in the responsive state of mind.
A good, fast read that will pick you up and maybe change you for the better.


Don't Sweat the Small Stuff . . . and It's All Small Stuff: Simple Ways to Keep the Little Things from Taking Over Your Life (Don't Sweat the Small Stuff Series)
Don't Sweat the Small Stuff . . . and It's All Small Stuff: Simple Ways to Keep the Little Things from Taking Over Your Life (Don't Sweat the Small Stuff Series)
von Richard Carlson
  Taschenbuch
Preis: EUR 14,99

1 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen How to cope with the fiendish pace of the Information Age, 3. Januar 2000
A highly-readable little paperback with a different perspective of the generations; your own, those before you, and those soon to follow. The book is enjoying a good run as a best-seller, living proof many among us must be anxiety-ridden and looking for answers.
Say to yourself: "Life isn't an emergency" advises Dr. Carlson, and admits this is his essential strategy on how to keep little things from taking over your life. Then, along with this, he confronts the reader with the realization (often unrecognized) that life is made up of "little things."
Each of the hundred short chapters contains ideas and true-life examples of how to work around the little things so life will be more livable and enjoyable minute-by-minute, hour-by-hour. It would seem that adopting even one of these sometimes profound, sometimes simplistic concepts of living, you can relieve stress in your life; more importantly, life will be a lot more fun.
Examples: Live in the present. When you look around, it's easy to see no one has a guarantee he or she will be here tomorrow; right now is the only time we have control over. When we focus on the present moment, fear of what might happen in the future (and most of these fearful events never happen) goes away so we are more relaxed.
Become more patient. Don't interrupt others or finish their sentences (a sign of impatience that says, "I'm waiting for you to finish so I can talk"). The more patient you are, the more you will accept how it really is, rather than insisting that life should be as you would like it to be. Patience adds ease and acceptance of life so essential for inner peace. Allowing the other person to finish speaking is a mark of patience which improves relationships. Those you are talking with feel more relaxed because they feel you are listening to what they have to say. Result; you enjoy conversations more and are more relaxed rather than rushing through them.
"One thing at a time." Admonishes Carlson. When you do too many things at once, it's impossible to concentrate on the present moment. Result: You cannot fully enjoy the moment because you are less effective and focused.
Here are some chapter titles that illustrate the broad range of anti-anxiety subject matter covered in the book: "Surrender to the Fact that Life Isn't Fair; "Allow Yourself to be Bored; "Seek First to Understand; "Become Aware of Your Moods and Don't Allow Yourself to be Fooled by the Low Ones; "Practice Random Acts of Kindness; "Choose Being Kind Over Being Right; "Every Day, Tell at Least One Person Something You Like, Admire or Appreciate About Them; "Resist The Urge to Criticize; "Write Down Your Five Most Stubborn Positions and See if You Can Soften Them; "Become a Less Aggressive Driver; "Think of What You Have Instead of What You Want; "Think of Your Problems as Potential Teachers; "Get Comfortable Not Knowing; "Remember, One Hundred Years from Now, All New People; "Mind Your Own Business; "Live This Day as if it Were Your Last. It Might Be!"
"Don't Sweat the Small Stuff" is a sprightly blend of old ideas and new ideas on how to how to cope with the fiendish pace of the Information Age. You won't recognize most of the old ideas though, because Author Carlson has dressed them up to fit today. In a gentle way, there's something rewarding here for almost everybody.


Conversations with God: An Uncommon Dialogue, Book 1 (Conversations with God (Hardcover))
Conversations with God: An Uncommon Dialogue, Book 1 (Conversations with God (Hardcover))
von Neale Donald Walsch
  Gebundene Ausgabe
Preis: EUR 23,99

3.0 von 5 Sternen Non-traditional book about religion, 3. Januar 2000
Conversations with God has many far-out ideas about who we are. It's a non-traditional book about religion; uncomfortable, yet reassuring. It's breaks new ground on who we are and where we came from. One idea is about our concept of time. Time exists vertically, says the author, not horizontally. It is not a left-to-right thing. There is no beginning or end. Everything just IS! You have always been, are now, and always will be. There has never been a time when you were not.
About "organized" religion..."in order for organized religion to succeed, it has to make people believe they need it. "So the first task of organized religion is to make you lose faith in yourself. "The second task is to make you see that it has the answers you do not. "And the third task is to make you accept its answers without question." Organized religion can't have you think because you're liable to come up with answers different from what has been contrived so it must make you doubt your ability to think straight.
On education. We are teaching children what to think rather than how to think. Schools are focused on knowledge, paying little attention to wisdom, whereas they should be focused on critical thinking, problem-solving and logic. Teach concepts, not subjects. Build around three core concepts: Awareness, honesty, responsibility. Suggestions for course subjects. Understanding power; peaceful conflict resolution, fairness, tolerance, honesty and responsibility, ethical economics, etc.
The Waldorf System. The teacher moves with the children through all levels of primary and elementary learning experience. The children have the same teacher rather than moving from one person to another. This is as important as any facts the teacher may pass on to the child.
On death... it is not an end, but a beginning; not a horror, but a joy; not a closing down, but an opening up. The happiest moment of your life will be the moment it ends.
Truth and politics cannot mix because politics is the art of saying only what needs to be said-and saying it in just the right way-in order to achieve a desired end. It is the application of practical psychology. In the U.S. we want government to "do it all" or we want to kill all laws whereas a delicate balance must be struck. In providing for people's needs, they must not be robbed of their dignity, individual creativity, and ingenuity, for this allows them to notice that they can provide for themselves.
The world's political machinery operates on self-interest...but something will have to change to make us see someone's else's interests as our own. The fastest way to see all humankind as your family is to stop separating yourself. Eliminating war. (1) Share enough resources with the world's people so no one will want or need. (2) Create a system for settling differences that eliminates war. There would be ample financing available to do this if military budgets were eliminated.
When you find peace within, you also find you can do without. "Not needing" frees you from fear and anger. When you have nothing to fear, you have nothing over which to be angry. Seeking and finding peace within would end wars, eliminate conflict, prevent injustice and bring world peace.
People would never put up with most of what happens in the world if they knew what was going on. Nothing makes for appropriate behavior faster than exposure to public scrutiny. Nothing breeds fairness faster than visibility which is another word for truth.
A hard read but worth the effort.


Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge
Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge
von Edward O. Wilson
  Gebundene Ausgabe

2 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Some natural laws from one of the greatest living scientists, 3. Januar 2000
One of the world's greatest living scientists, the author sets forth the premise that a few natural laws form the principles of creation and we need to isolate them. Professor Wilson, pioneer of sociobiology and biodiversity, has authored two Pulitzer prize-winning books and lectures throughout the world. He is currently Research Professor and Honorary Curator of the Harvard Museum of Comparative Zoology.
Some of his observations confirm truisms, to wit: "the mind...sees the world only in pieces. "It throws a spotlight on those portions... it must know in order to live to the next day, and surrenders the rest to darkness." Some sobering one-liners: There is almost no probability any two human beings shared identical genes. Life evolved over billions of years. We are a product of our genes and our culture, not of one or the other. Alcoholism is infrequently inherited in males, and almost never in females. Over 1200 physical and psychological disorders have now been tied to single genes from color blindness to single-cell anemia and eventually all will be curable through biochemicals.
On who survives. Those who possess brainpower with the ability to make wise choices, survive longer and leave more offspring than those with brainpower that chooses poorly. We are drowning in information and starving for wisdom, so the world will shortly be run by people able to put together the right information at the right time, think about it critically, and make the right choices.
The big story in contemporary evolution is that the only thing about human evolution that is changing is homogenization through immigration and interbreeding. The average differences among people in different parts of the world was not very great to begin with and is narrowing.
Defining the arts. The arts express the human condition through mood and feeling. They call into play all the senses using the elements of order and disorder. It is partly through the arts we learn that 'high cultures commonly possess a combination of exceptional knowledge, technical skill, originality, sensitivity to detail, ambition, boldness, and drive. Artistic creations are meant to appeal to the beholder without analysis.
Educated predictions about the dire future of the human race. By the year 2025, 40% of the world will live with chronic water scarcity. Sometime, in the near future our oceans are going to be fished out. Atmospheric scientists say that because of carbon dioxide air pollution we are increasing global warming and this is reducing our ability to grow food. It is also the cause of clouds and storms. Wilson says flat out that we shall see an environmental bottleneck in the 21st century which will result in a collapse of civilization. This has happened to smaller cultures over the centuries, but the human population is now so great, the effects will be worldwide. He calls population growth: "The monster of the land." The answer: Shrink population to a level that can be sustained by the Earth's fragile environment. He suggests the time has come for economists and business leaders to accept real-world cost accounting which includes the loss of natural resources.
One is awed by what Professor Wilson tells us about ourselves and all the living things around us. This is a scientific book and a hard read, but the conclusions are earth-shaking and we should pay attention to what he is saying about our survival. The signs are abundant he has it right and the human race will dip out of sight sometime in the 21st century and are evidently powerless to stop our own extinction.


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