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Worms Eat My Garbage: How to Set Up and Maintain a Worm Composting System (Englisch) Taschenbuch – Juni 1997

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Taschenbuch, Juni 1997
EUR 23,76 EUR 0,74
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Produktinformation

Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

"[This book] supplies everything you want to know about worm composting but didn't know where to ask."--Green Living Magazine

..". people ... will thank [Appelhof] for showing us ... how we can eat better food by growing gardens with wormpower."--Pete Seeger, folksinger, environmental activist

"You might say that Kalamazoo has become the epicenter of vermiculture (a fancy name for worm composting) ..."--Anne Raver, The New York Times

"[This book] supplies everything you want to know about worm composting but didn't know where to ask."--Green Living Magazine



..". people ... will thank [Appelhof] for showing us ... how we can eat better food by growing gardens with wormpower."--Pete Seeger, folksinger, environmental activist



"You might say that Kalamazoo has become the epicenter of vermiculture (a fancy name for worm composting) ..."--Anne Raver, The New York Times

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Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

Mary Appelhof, prepared by master s degrees in biology and education, spent over 30 years working to develop a system for using redworms to process organic waste. Recognized as an international authority and lecturer on small-scale vermicomposting she received many honors including a National Science Foundation Grant and the National Recycling Coalition s Recycler of the Year 2005, Lifetime Achievement.

Mary coordinated the highly successful Workshop on the Role of Earthworms in Stabilization of Organic Residues, compiling its proceedings. She also hosted the Vermillenniumin 2000, which was attended by 129 scientists and worm workers from 19 countries. A former high school biology teacher Mary had the ability to present scientific information in a format easily understood by the layperson. This is evident in the number of lectures she gave internationally during her lifetime. Author of Worms Eat My Garbage her self-published book has sold over 200,000 copies and continues to be the handbook on vermicomposting. Mary, the Worm Woman of Kalamazoo, died in 2005.

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Format: Taschenbuch
I enjoyed all of the information and found this book to not only be informative and interesting but also very easy to read. I also found the author to be humorous in her writing. This book gives the do's and don'ts that are very helpful.
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Format: Taschenbuch
Mary Appelhof's book is both amusing and educational. This is the "Vermi Bible" for most people who compost their household waste with worms (vermicomposting).

This 2nd edition includes description and discussion on commercially-available vermicomposting bins. Unfortunately, with the excitement and growing interest in worm composting, there are bins now available that are not reviewed in the book. (I guess we'll need a 3rd Edition!)

For the beginner as well as the worm hobbyist, I recommend this book highly.
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This is an excellent book for anyone interested in lowering the ammount of garbage they send to the landfills. If you have an interest in raising more healthy plants, better fising bait, or just want the experience this is the book to start with. While written on a 10th grade reading level, this book is wonderful reading for anyone. My background is in biology and I found some of the side notes very useful. This is a book that everyone should read even if you have no desire to raise worms.
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Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.6 von 5 Sternen 193 Rezensionen
125 von 127 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen Not so great, leaves a lot to be desired 19. November 2012
Von Dan Knauss - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
This is a cute and eccentric, rather dated, oddly organized, and not very scientific guide to vermicomposting. It's fine on the basics of keeping a worm composter, but much of its advice is easy to misunderstand or understand incompletely due to the lack of good pictures and hands-on, detailed description of specific scenarios. On some issues it is simply wrong. If you really want to understand your worms and the compost ecosystem you're creating for them, you'll be better off reading multiple online sources devoted to vermicomposting and talking with people who do it.

"Worms Eat My Garbage," like many guides, provides fine advice as far as it goes; it just doesn't explain much about *why* you should do this or not do that. It also fails to put the key issues front and center for people new to worm and compost care: how the worms will behave in your vermicomposter if they are healthy or unhealthy, what they need or like and don't like in their environment and diet, how to understand what you see, and the main ways you can screw up.

I don't believe the book ever points out that worms live on *microbes* in decomposing organic matter, and they only eat your "garbage" in the process of getting at microbes. Explaining the chemistry of composting and decomposition processes (aerobic and anaerobic) would be really helpful, but that's not really covered here either. For example, nitrogen and sugars or starches can break down into wet, potentially toxic byproducts like ammonia and alcohols, which are not good for worms in quantity, especially if the worms can't get away from them. How pH/acidity levels rise and fall is a related concern you won't learn much about from this book.

Here is an example that is typical of the book's main flaw. There is a rambling discussion about how worms may not like something in lemon rinds or orange rinds, or citrus fruits in general. The author talks about a kid who wrote to her about this, explaining how limonene works, apparently based on experiments or expertise of a parent who may or may not have worked at a laboratory. Wouldn't you rather have some hard science and real sources about the relative toxicity of limonene and acidity in your compost, what fruits have it in quantity, and so on? Instead you just get this long anecdote that shows the author does not understand the chemistry and can't tell you definitely how to handle certain fruits in your compost based on an actual known risk. You will find other sources online that say citrus is fine, including lemon and orange peels, but some worms dislike their acidity, as well as other food, like onions, that is acidic. Worms will only eat things they don't like when there is nothing else to eat or the disagreeable food is decomposed enough to be full of microbial life and attractive to worms. I am not sure what the 100% correct view is on this subject, but it's clear "Worms Eat My Garbage" provides more opinion and anecdote than science.

Some things I've read in this book and others like it are confusing because they're presented as rules to follow but are contradicted later, or by other sources. For example, "Worms Eat My Garbage" advises blending up and microwaving your food waste before adding it to the vermicompost, but it doesn't explain the pros and cons, especially if your bin doesn't allow much airflow. Breaking down the food before adding it to the bin can actually help offset the potential problems of foods worms like less, especially if you let the blended mush dry out and get moldy before you add it to your worm bin. In "Worms Eat My Garbage" there's no explanation like this, and no warning about how too much finely chopped food waste -- especially if it's wet -- can also create a sludge the worms can't enter. Too much dense sludge will result in anaerobic decomposition as well, creating a stinky mess and leachate that may be toxic to worms and houseplants. The importance of surface area, air flow, and loose solids should have been emphasized to offset the idea that you should put a lot of "compost smoothie" in your bin.

What you're dealing with are many variables in a dynamic system, so it's really not a matter of "don't ever do this" or "always do this" -- it's "do A if you also B this under these other conditions C and D, but look out for E and F happening." I don't mean to make it sound like vermicompost is a very delicate system but that it's much more educational and fun to understand as a variable and dynamic system that provides certain feedback you can understand and respond to as conditions change.

"Worms Eat my Garbage" is, like many worm guides, insufficient on the subject of proteins in a similar way it mishandles acidity and citrus. Meats, eggs and dairy, raw grains and processed grains or breads are generally not wanted in compost due to the odors, flies and critters they can attract. Nevertheless, these foods will break down and be enjoyed by worms, so with sufficient care in a well-sealed (or basement/garage) composter you can add them if you take care to understand what you are doing and maintain appropriate moisture and airflow levels. "Worms Eat My Garbage" says small amounts of meat are OK but should probably warn the reader that meat is generally a bad thing to add to compost due to the smell and leachate meats will produce and the creatures it may attract, especially outdoors. On the other hand, dairy and grains can work fine--a subject not covered in this book. Wet, spent (brewing) grains or breads are a special case, as adding a thick pile of them may cause anaerobic decomposition that creates alcohols and ammonia. Yet grain can work out fine if it's not overdone in a well-drained and aerated composter.

This level of detail is entirely lacking in "Worms Eat My Garbage." If you want more than dos and don'ts, if you want to experiment and explore or learn the science of worms and decomposition, this book won't satisfy you.
124 von 130 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Hey! I loved this book! 21. November 2001
Von Taiji 218 - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
This was a fun book about the little creepy crawlers! It gives a very solid scientific introduction to the little critters and answers most of your basic questions about worms. The focus of the book has to with vermiculture--the use of worms for developing super-rich compost material for organic gardens. Vermicompost is without a doubt the best composting material available for organic gardeners, and setting up your own vermicomposting bin is the best way to get yourself some of this richly organic fertilizer.
The book details how you can set up your own vermicompost bin, either by making it yourself or by purchasing a commercial worm bin. It also even describes how some school systems have saved themselves bundles of money by having worms eat the schoolkids' lunch scraps rather than pay for commercial garbagemen to haul the stuff away!
I would most strongly recommend this book for anybody interested in either worms, vermicomposting or organic gardening. It's a very fun read!
76 von 83 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A "Must" Book for Home Vermicomposters! 21. Dezember 1999
Von G R DEMBROFF from The Happy D Ranch Worm Farm - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
Mary Appelhof's book is both amusing and educational. This is the "Vermi Bible" for most people who compost their household waste with worms (vermicomposting).

This 2nd edition includes description and discussion on commercially-available vermicomposting bins. Unfortunately, with the excitement and growing interest in worm composting, there are bins now available that are not reviewed in the book. (I guess we'll need a 3rd Edition!)

For the beginner as well as the worm hobbyist, I recommend this book highly.
42 von 46 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A "user friendly" guide to recycling kitchen food waste 14. Januar 2004
Von Midwest Book Review - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
Now in its revised second edition, Worms Eat My Garbage by Mary Appelhof is a practical and "user friendly" guide to recycling kitchen food waste, producing fertilizer for house and garden plants, growing fishing worms, and saving money, all through the process of a worm composting system. Worms Eat My Garbage is a simple, effective, "how-to" guide covering everything from how to set up a worm bin, to what types of garbage are best for worm composting, to taking care of the worms, to effectively saving money while reaping the benefits of the process. Worms Eat My Garbage is easy-to-follow, thorough, and enthusiastically recommended reference for environmentalists and gardeners.
20 von 21 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen All you need to know to start your own compost 26. August 2007
Von F. Cueto - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
I must say that I knew most of the stuff contained in the book, since the web contains a LOT of information. Nevertheless, the online info is quite dispersed. Here you can have all the knowledge in one book. Also, I did not give it 5 stars, because I think it still lacks a bit of professionalism; the author indeed knew a lot from decades for worm composting, but still, a lot of her knowledge was empiric and seems unsure of some of the causes. For instance, she emphasizes a lot on cold climates and gives little info on hot climates.
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