Facebook Twitter Pinterest
EUR 5,99
  • Statt: EUR 6,99
  • Sie sparen: EUR 1,00 (14%)
  • Alle Preisangaben inkl. USt
Nur noch 17 auf Lager (mehr ist unterwegs).
Verkauf und Versand durch Amazon. Geschenkverpackung verfügbar.
Wide Sargasso Sea (Pengui... ist in Ihrem Einkaufwagen hinzugefügt worden
Möchten Sie verkaufen?
Zur Rückseite klappen Zur Vorderseite klappen
Hörprobe Wird gespielt... Angehalten   Sie hören eine Hörprobe des Audible Hörbuch-Downloads.
Mehr erfahren
Dieses Bild anzeigen

Wide Sargasso Sea (Penguin Student Editions) (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 26. April 2001

3.4 von 5 Sternen 62 Kundenrezensionen

Alle 45 Formate und Ausgaben anzeigen Andere Formate und Ausgaben ausblenden
Preis
Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Taschenbuch
"Bitte wiederholen"
EUR 5,99
EUR 4,57 EUR 1,15
Audio-CD, Audiobook
"Bitte wiederholen"
68 neu ab EUR 4,57 24 gebraucht ab EUR 1,15
click to open popover

Wird oft zusammen gekauft

  • Wide Sargasso Sea (Penguin Student Editions)
  • +
  • Jane Eyre
Gesamtpreis: EUR 9,53
Die ausgewählten Artikel zusammen kaufen

Es wird kein Kindle Gerät benötigt. Laden Sie eine der kostenlosen Kindle Apps herunter und beginnen Sie, Kindle-Bücher auf Ihrem Smartphone, Tablet und Computer zu lesen.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

Geben Sie Ihre Mobiltelefonnummer ein, um die kostenfreie App zu beziehen.

Jeder kann Kindle Bücher lesen — selbst ohne ein Kindle-Gerät — mit der KOSTENFREIEN Kindle App für Smartphones, Tablets und Computer.


Produktinformation

Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

In 1966 Jean Rhys reemerged after a long silence with a novel called Wide Sargasso Sea. Rhys had enjoyed minor literary success in the 1920s and '30s with a series of evocative novels featuring women protagonists adrift in Europe, verging on poverty, hoping to be saved by men. By the '40s, however, her work was out of fashion, too sad for a world at war. And Rhys herself was often too sad for the world--she was suicidal, alcoholic, troubled by a vast loneliness. She was also a great writer, despite her powerful self-destructive impulses.

Wide Sargasso Sea is the story of Antoinette Cosway, a Creole heiress who grew up in the West Indies on a decaying plantation. When she comes of age she is married off to an Englishman, and he takes her away from the only place she has known--a house with a garden where "the paths were overgrown and a smell of dead flowers mixed with the fresh living smell. Underneath the tree ferns, tall as forest tree ferns, the light was green. Orchids flourished out of reach or for some reason not to be touched."

The novel is Rhys's answer to Jane Eyre. Charlotte Brontë's book had long haunted her, mostly for the story it did not tell--that of the madwoman in the attic, Rochester's terrible secret. Antoinette is Rhys's imagining of that locked-up woman, who in the end burns up the house and herself. Wide Sargasso Sea follows her voyage into the dark, both from her point of view and Rochester's. It is a voyage charged with soul-destroying lust. "I watched her die many times," observes the new husband. "In my way, not in hers. In sunlight, in shadow, by moonlight, by candlelight. In the long afternoons when the house was empty."

Rhys struggled over the book, enduring rejections and revisions, wrestling to bring this ruined woman out of the ashes. The slim volume was finally published when she was 70 years old. The critical adulation that followed, she said, "has come too late." Jean Rhys died a few years later, but with Wide Sargasso Sea she left behind a great legacy, a work of strange, scary loveliness. There has not been a book like it before or since. Believe me, I've been searching. --Emily White -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine vergriffene oder nicht verfügbare Ausgabe dieses Titels.

Pressestimmen

Compelling, painful and exquisite (Guardian)

Brilliant. A tale of dislocation and dispossession, which Rhys writes with a kind of romantic cynicism, desperate and pungent (The Times)

Rhys turns a menacing cipher into a grieving, plausible young woman, and one whose story says whole worlds about global mixtures, about the misunderstandings between the colonized, the colonizers and the people who can't easily say which they are (Time) -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine vergriffene oder nicht verfügbare Ausgabe dieses Titels.

Alle Produktbeschreibungen

Welche anderen Artikel kaufen Kunden, nachdem sie diesen Artikel angesehen haben?

Kundenrezensionen

Top-Kundenrezensionen

Von Ein Kunde am 10. Juni 2005
Format: Taschenbuch
Wide Sargasso Sea is a response to the well-known classic text Jane Eyre from the point of view of the most marginalized character, Bertha Mason. In Jane Eyre, the first Mrs Rochester is imprisoned in the attic because she is mad, the only additional information we get about her is that she came from Jamaica, one of Britain's colonies. Herself born in Dominica, in the West Indies, Jean Rhys was annoyed to find that Charlotte Bronte had made a West Indian white Creole like herself into a lunatic, and thus set out to rewrite the story from a different point of view.
Beside the main text, this edition provides an Introduction, a Chronology, Language Notes and Activities, Further Activities and Study Questions, Setting and Background Notes, Character Notes, a Text Summary, Critical Responses, and Suggestions for Further Reading.
Kommentar 11 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
Missbrauch melden
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
'Jane Eyre' was one of my favorite books when I was a teenager and if I had read 'Wide Sargasso Sea' right after reading 'Jane Eyre', I would have hated it for deconstructing the heroic image of Mr. Rochester. I'm glad I discovered WSS much later. It's an intriguing, fascinating study of Mr. Rochester and his first wife, Antoinette Mason, the prototype of the 'mad wife in the attic' who played a minor but vital part in 'Jane Eyre'. Antoinette's mother descends into madness following the loss of the family estate to a slave rebellion. To shore up the family fortune and save her from becoming an old maid, and thus a burden, she is married off to Mr. Rochester, newly arrived from England, who knows nothing about her mother's insanity. WSS shows us the other side of Mr. Rochester that Jane Eyre couldn't or wouldn't see: his coldness, his selfishness, and his opportunism. We can understand how, as he did in 'Jane Eyre', such a man would lie to an innocent young woman about his marital status and nearly trap her into unwittingly participating in a sham marriage. Rochester is attracted to Antoinette at first; he is dazzled by her beauty as well as her money and eager to marry her. Once the honeymoon phase is over, he is unable to adjust to his surroundings. Jamaica is antipathetic to everything he grew up with, it's wild, untamed, a study in extremes, anathema to a tidy, organized, narrow-minded European, and Rochester is the typical insular-minded Englishman who despises what he is unable to understand.Lesen Sie weiter... ›
Kommentar 5 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
Missbrauch melden
Von Jassu79 VINE-PRODUKTTESTER am 1. Oktober 2007
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
Once you've read this novel, Charlotte Bronte's perennial classic will never appear in the same light to you as before. Jean Rhys takes the marginalized and demonized first Mrs. Rochester and turns her into a full-fledged, complex character who earns the reader's sympathy. Victorian racism, imperialism and morality are exposed for what they are, and yet this is done so subtly that it does not feel "over the top". In short: "Wide Sargasso Sea" is a superb companion piece to "Jane Eyre" that allows us to view its predecessor in a whole new light.
Kommentar 4 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
Missbrauch melden
Von Ein Kunde am 11. Juli 2000
Format: Taschenbuch
This book is a must read for fans of Bronte's JANE EYRE. Jean Rhys depicts the life of Berthe, the madwoman in Bronte's novel. The author shows it from the perspective of both Berthe (a.k.a. Antoinette) and Rochester. By the end of the novel it is understandable why Berthe became the madwoman in the attic. Rhys takes the reader through the tortured life of Berthe as a young girl into womanhood and her eventual marriage to Rochester. Clearly, there was not much hope for Berthe within her environment. Furthermore, Rochester gives up on his new wife too easily, forcing her to retreat further and further into herself. He falls quite short of being the loving husband. This book causes the reader to see both Berthe and Rochester in entirely different lights. When reading JANE EYRE, Berthe seems the nasty culprit. However, after reading WIDE SARGASSO SEA, the opinion you originally had may change drastically. All in all a wonderful read. It answers all the questions you may have asked yourself when reading JANE EYRE.
Kommentar 3 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
Missbrauch melden
Format: Taschenbuch
This book is a real gem, which can be analized on many levels. This is not simply a passionate love story. It is a wonderful description of the Caribbean plantation society of the late 1800's, and an excellent account of the relationship that existed at that time between the new class of Caribbean Creoles and the members of the metropolitan European society. The author brilliantly uses the unequal relationship between a man and a woman to symbolize the historic colonial relationship. In addition, the novel is an important contribution to Caribbean literature in the sense that it was able to take the European classic Jean Eyre and bring it into the Caribbean context. A wonderful book for anyone studying Latin America or the Caribbean
Kommentar Eine Person fand diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
Missbrauch melden
Format: Taschenbuch
Whether or not we as readers realize the implications of "the novel," the fact of the matter is that as a cultural artifact, all stories have behind their facade, the hidden barbarism of history. In "Wide Sargasso Sea," Jean Rhys confronts possibility of another side to "Jane Eyre."

The story of Bertha, the first Mrs. Rochester, "Wide Sargasso Sea" is a not only a brilliant deconstruction of Charlotte Brontë's legacy, but is also a damning history of colonialism in the West Indies. Told from different points of view, the text is a tapestry weaving Bertha's story with Edward Rochester's early life. Like the seaweed the book is named for, the structure floats in and out of artistic consciousness as though on a sea of many unwritten stories.

Although some might argue that "Wide Sargasso Sea," detracts from "Jane Eyre," I feel that Jean Rhys gives us a fuller understanding about the cultural historiography that produces "great literature." As a champion for the silenced voices, Charlotte Brontë herself was all too aware of societies' injustices. While today, "Jane Eyre" is generally accepted as a tract on social class, feminism, and conscious production of art, 150 years ago, Brontë was lambasted by contemporary critics as unchristian, seditious and a poor writer. I can not help but think Brontë, as social critic, would have cheered the publication of "Wide Sargasso Sea."
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
Missbrauch melden

Die neuesten Kundenrezensionen