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Why Everyone (Else) Is a Hypocrite: Evolution and the Modular Mind (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 3. Juli 2012

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Using humour and anecdotes, he reveals how conflict between the modules of the mind leads to contradictory beliefs, vacillating behaviours, broken moral boundaries and inflated egos. He argues that we should think of ourselves not as 'I' but as 'we'--a collection of interacting systems that are in constant conflict. -- Nature

Highly recommended. -- Jessica Palmer, Bioephemera blog


Bolstered by recent studies and research, Kurzban makes a convincing and coherent . . . case for the modular mind, greatly helped by humorous footnotes and examples. . . . Taking on lofty topics, including truth and belief, Kurzban makes a successful case for changing--and remapping--the modern mind. -- Publishers Weekly



Using humour and anecdotes, [Kurzban] reveals how conflict between the modules of the mind leads to contradictory beliefs, vacillating behaviours, broken moral boundaries and inflated egos. He argues that we should think of ourselves not as 'I' but as 'we'--a collection of interacting systems that are in constant conflict. -- Nature



Kurzban is a luminary in the growing discipline of evolutionary psychology. . . . [P]rovocative. . . . Kurzban devotes much space to explicating and demonstrating ways in which his theory plays out in our everyday lives. -- Library Journal



With wit, wisdom, and occasional hilarity, Robert Kurzban offers explanations for why we do the things we do, such as morally condemning the sale of human organs and locking the refrigerator at night to keep from snacking. . . . Kurzban touches on some complex topics in a manner that's both smart and accessible. He incorporates a plethora of psychological studies to support his theories but the narrative is never dry. . . . By challenging common assumptions about habits, morality, and preferences, Kurzban keeps readers both entertained and enlightened. -- Foreword Reviews



Highly recommended. -- Jessica Palmer, Bioephemera blog


Bolstered by recent studies and research, Kurzban makes a convincing and coherent . . . case for the modular mind, greatly helped by humorous footnotes and examples. . . . Taking on lofty topics, including truth and belief, Kurzban makes a successful case for changing--and remapping--the modern mind. -- "Publishers Weekly

Using humour and anecdotes, [Kurzban] reveals how conflict between the modules of the mind leads to contradictory beliefs, vacillating behaviours, broken moral boundaries and inflated egos. He argues that we should think of ourselves not as 'I' but as 'we'--a collection of interacting systems that are in constant conflict. -- "Nature

With wit, wisdom, and occasional hilarity, Robert Kurzban offers explanations for why we do the things we do, such as morally condemning the sale of human organs and locking the refrigerator at night to keep from snacking. . . . Kurzban touches on some complex topics in a manner that's both smart and accessible. He incorporates a plethora of psychological studies to support his theories but the narrative is never dry. . . . By challenging common assumptions about habits, morality, and preferences, Kurzban keeps readers both entertained and enlightened. -- "Foreword Reviews

Kurzban is a luminary in the growing discipline of evolutionary psychology. . . . [P]rovocative. . . . Kurzban devotes much space to explicating and demonstrating ways in which his theory plays out in our everyday lives. -- "Library Journal

Robert Kurzban believes that we are all hypocrites. But not to worry, he explains, hypocrisy is the natural state of the human mind. In his book "Why Everyone (Else) Is a Hypocrite: Evolution and the Modular Mind", Kurzban asserts that the human mind consists of many specialized units, which do not always work together seamlessly. When this harmony breaks down, people often develop contradictory beliefs.--Victoria Stern "Scientific American Mind "

[T]here is much that is valuable in Kurzban's book.--Peter Carruthers "Trends in Cognitive Sciences "

[Kurzban] argues that . . . internal conflicts are not limited to extreme cases; they occur in everyone's brains, leading to illogical beliefs and contradictory behaviors. That's not necessarily a bad thing, according to Kurzban. In fact, being selectively irrational may give us an evolutionary advantage.--Kacie Glenn "Chronicle of Higher Education "

Robert Kurzban has used his view of evolutionary psychology to pursue the concept of 'self' at the heart of both the discipline of psychology and the everyday understanding of human behavior--which surely is of interest to everyone. . . . The book itself is fresh. Kurzban's style is to take traditional questions and apparently reasonable positions and then demonstrate that reasonableness is actually only so under a set of assumptions--and that if they do not conform to the modularity hypothesis then we ought to rethink.--Tom Dickins "Times Higher Education "

Highly recommended.--Jessica Palmer "Bioephemera blog "

I'm sure that "Why Everyone (Else) Is a Hypocrite" will provoke a lot of controversy, and I'm certain that Kurzban's theses will require further refinement. But what a fascinating read!--Brenda Jubin "Reading the Markets blog "

We're all inconsistent and self-deceiving, says evolutionary psychologist Robert Kurzban. Our modular minds didn't evolve for consistency, but for patchwork multitasking. . . . As Kurzban says, understanding how and why we can be so 'ignorant, wrong, irrational, and hypocritical' may help us work towards a fairer society.--Susan Blackmore "BBC Focus "

Kurzban brilliantly (and often hilariously) breaks down the system of functional modules, explaining their existence through evolution, and their hypocrisy through a lack of communication. "Why Everyone (Else) is a Hypocrite" delves into a part of psychology that has famously been ignored by many prominent members in the field.--Haley M. Dillon and Rachael A. Carmen "Journal of Social, Evolutionary, and Cultural Psychology "


Robert Kurzban believes that we are all hypocrites. But not to worry, he explains, hypocrisy is the natural state of the human mind. In his book "Why Everyone (Else) Is a Hypocrite: Evolution and the Modular Mind", Kurzban asserts that the human mind consists of many specialized units, which do not always work together seamlessly. When this harmony breaks down, people often develop contradictory beliefs.
--Victoria Stern "Scientific American Mind "


[Kurzban] argues that . . . internal conflicts are not limited to extreme cases; they occur in everyone's brains, leading to illogical beliefs and contradictory behaviors. That's not necessarily a bad thing, according to Kurzban. In fact, being selectively irrational may give us an evolutionary advantage.
--Kacie Glenn "Chronicle of Higher Education "


Robert Kurzban has used his view of evolutionary psychology to pursue the concept of 'self' at the heart of both the discipline of psychology and the everyday understanding of human behavior--which surely is of interest to everyone. . . . The book itself is fresh. Kurzban's style is to take traditional questions and apparently reasonable positions and then demonstrate that reasonableness is actually only so under a set of assumptions--and that if they do not conform to the modularity hypothesis then we ought to rethink.
--Tom Dickins "Times Higher Education "


Highly recommended.
--Jessica Palmer "Bioephemera blog "


I'm sure that "Why Everyone (Else) Is a Hypocrite" will provoke a lot of controversy, and I'm certain that Kurzban's theses will require further refinement. But what a fascinating read!
--Brenda Jubin "Reading the Markets blog "


[T]here is much that is valuable in Kurzban's book.
--Peter Carruthers "Trends in Cognitive Sciences "


We're all inconsistent and self-deceiving, says evolutionary psychologist Robert Kurzban. Our modular minds didn't evolve for consistency, but for patchwork multitasking. . . . As Kurzban says, understanding how and why we can be so 'ignorant, wrong, irrational, and hypocritical' may help us work towards a fairer society.
--Susan Blackmore "BBC Focus "


Kurzban brilliantly (and often hilariously) breaks down the system of functional modules, explaining their existence through evolution, and their hypocrisy through a lack of communication. "Why Everyone (Else) is a Hypocrite" delves into a part of psychology that has famously been ignored by many prominent members in the field.
--Haley M. Dillon and Rachael A. Carmen "Journal of Social, Evolutionary, and Cultural Psychology "

"[T]here is much that is valuable in Kurzbans book."--Peter Carruthers, "Trends in Cognitive Sciences"

"Highly recommended."--Jessica Palmer, "Bioephemera blog"

"I'm sure that "Why Everyone (Else) Is a Hypocrite" will provoke a lot of controversy, and I'm certain that Kurzban's theses will require further refinement. But what a fascinating read!"--Brenda Jubin, "Reading the Markets blog"

"Bolstered by recent studies and research, Kurzban makes a convincing and coherent . . . case for the modular mind, greatly helped by humorous footnotes and examples. . . . Taking on lofty topics, including truth and belief, Kurzban makes a successful case for changing--and remapping--the modern mind."--Publishers Weekly

"Using humour and anecdotes, [Kurzban] reveals how conflict between the modules of the mind leads to contradictory beliefs, vacillating behaviours, broken moral boundaries and inflated egos. He argues that we should think of ourselves not as 'I' but as 'we'--a collection of interacting systems that are in constant conflict."--Nature

"Robert Kurzban believes that we are all hypocrites. But not to worry, he explains, hypocrisy is the natural state of the human mind. In his book Why Everyone (Else) Is a Hypocrite: Evolution and the Modular Mind, Kurzban asserts that the human mind consists of many specialized units, which do not always work together seamlessly. When this harmony breaks down, people often develop contradictory beliefs."--Victoria Stern, Scientific American Mind

"Kurzban is a luminary in the growing discipline of evolutionary psychology. . . . [P]rovocative. . . . Kurzban devotes much space to explicating and demonstrating ways in which his theory plays out in our everyday lives."--Library Journal

"With wit, wisdom, and occasional hilarity, Robert Kurzban offers explanations for why we do the things we do, such as morally condemning the sale of human organs and locking the refrigerator at night to keep from snacking. . . . Kurzban touches on some complex topics in a manner that's both smart and accessible. He incorporates a plethora of psychological studies to support his theories but the narrative is never dry. . . . By challenging common assumptions about habits, morality, and preferences, Kurzban keeps readers both entertained and enlightened."--Foreword Reviews

"[Kurzban] argues that . . . internal conflicts are not limited to extreme cases; they occur in everyone's brains, leading to illogical beliefs and contradictory behaviors. That's not necessarily a bad thing, according to Kurzban. In fact, being selectively irrational may give us an evolutionary advantage."--Kacie Glenn, Chronicle of Higher Education

"Robert Kurzban has used his view of evolutionary psychology to pursue the concept of 'self' at the heart of both the discipline of psychology and the everyday understanding of human behavior--which surely is of interest to everyone. . . . The book itself is fresh. Kurzban's style is to take traditional questions and apparently reasonable positions and then demonstrate that reasonableness is actually only so under a set of assumptions--and that if they do not conform to the modularity hypothesis then we ought to rethink."--Tom Dickins, Times Higher Education

"Highly recommended."--Jessica Palmer, Bioephemera blog

"I'm sure that Why Everyone (Else) Is a Hypocrite will provoke a lot of controversy, and I'm certain that Kurzban's theses will require further refinement. But what a fascinating read!"--Brenda Jubin, Reading the Markets blog

"[T]here is much that is valuable in Kurzban's book."--Peter Carruthers, Trends in Cognitive Sciences

"We're all inconsistent and self-deceiving, says evolutionary psychologist Robert Kurzban. Our modular minds didn't evolve for consistency, but for patchwork multitasking. . . . As Kurzban says, understanding how and why we can be so 'ignorant, wrong, irrational, and hypocritical' may help us work towards a fairer society."--Susan Blackmore, BBC Focus

"Kurzban brilliantly (and often hilariously) breaks down the system of functional modules, explaining their existence through evolution, and their hypocrisy through a lack of communication. Why Everyone (Else) is a Hypocrite delves into a part of psychology that has famously been ignored by many prominent members in the field."--Haley M. Dillon and Rachael A. Carmen, Journal of Social, Evolutionary, and Cultural Psychology

-Bolstered by recent studies and research, Kurzban makes a convincing and coherent . . . case for the modular mind, greatly helped by humorous footnotes and examples. . . . Taking on lofty topics, including truth and belief, Kurzban makes a successful case for changing--and remapping--the modern mind.---Publishers Weekly

-Using humour and anecdotes, [Kurzban] reveals how conflict between the modules of the mind leads to contradictory beliefs, vacillating behaviours, broken moral boundaries and inflated egos. He argues that we should think of ourselves not as 'I' but as 'we'--a collection of interacting systems that are in constant conflict.---Nature

-Robert Kurzban believes that we are all hypocrites. But not to worry, he explains, hypocrisy is the natural state of the human mind. In his book Why Everyone (Else) Is a Hypocrite: Evolution and the Modular Mind, Kurzban asserts that the human mind consists of many specialized units, which do not always work together seamlessly. When this harmony breaks down, people often develop contradictory beliefs.---Victoria Stern, Scientific American Mind

-Kurzban is a luminary in the growing discipline of evolutionary psychology. . . . [P]rovocative. . . . Kurzban devotes much space to explicating and demonstrating ways in which his theory plays out in our everyday lives.---Library Journal

-With wit, wisdom, and occasional hilarity, Robert Kurzban offers explanations for why we do the things we do, such as morally condemning the sale of human organs and locking the refrigerator at night to keep from snacking. . . . Kurzban touches on some complex topics in a manner that's both smart and accessible. He incorporates a plethora of psychological studies to support his theories but the narrative is never dry. . . . By challenging common assumptions about habits, morality, and preferences, Kurzban keeps readers both entertained and enlightened.---Foreword Reviews

-[Kurzban] argues that . . . internal conflicts are not limited to extreme cases; they occur in everyone's brains, leading to illogical beliefs and contradictory behaviors. That's not necessarily a bad thing, according to Kurzban. In fact, being selectively irrational may give us an evolutionary advantage.---Kacie Glenn, Chronicle of Higher Education

-Robert Kurzban has used his view of evolutionary psychology to pursue the concept of 'self' at the heart of both the discipline of psychology and the everyday understanding of human behavior--which surely is of interest to everyone. . . . The book itself is fresh. Kurzban's style is to take traditional questions and apparently reasonable positions and then demonstrate that reasonableness is actually only so under a set of assumptions--and that if they do not conform to the modularity hypothesis then we ought to rethink.---Tom Dickins, Times Higher Education

-Highly recommended.---Jessica Palmer, Bioephemera blog

-I'm sure that Why Everyone (Else) Is a Hypocrite will provoke a lot of controversy, and I'm certain that Kurzban's theses will require further refinement. But what a fascinating read!---Brenda Jubin, Reading the Markets blog

-[T]here is much that is valuable in Kurzban's book.---Peter Carruthers, Trends in Cognitive Sciences

-We're all inconsistent and self-deceiving, says evolutionary psychologist Robert Kurzban. Our modular minds didn't evolve for consistency, but for patchwork multitasking. . . . As Kurzban says, understanding how and why we can be so 'ignorant, wrong, irrational, and hypocritical' may help us work towards a fairer society.---Susan Blackmore, BBC Focus

-Kurzban brilliantly (and often hilariously) breaks down the system of functional modules, explaining their existence through evolution, and their hypocrisy through a lack of communication. Why Everyone (Else) is a Hypocrite delves into a part of psychology that has famously been ignored by many prominent members in the field.---Haley M. Dillon and Rachael A. Carmen, Journal of Social, Evolutionary, and Cultural Psychology

Buchrückseite

"Robert Kurzban is one of the best evolutionary psychologists of his generation: he is distinctive not only for his own successful research and sophisticated understanding of psychology, but also because of his wit--Kurzban is genuinely clever, sly, succinct, and sometimes hilarious."--Steven Pinker, Harvard University

"In this amazing book, Robert Kurzban carries out a brilliantly thought-provoking conversation with himself that made me think hard--and laugh out loud. Using clever examples and a revolutionary scientific approach, he shows that contradiction is truly a fundamental human experience. No wonder, then, that I wanted to share this book with my friends--but I also wanted to keep it for myself! If you don't read this book, you'll be left wondering what everyone (else) is talking about."--James H. Fowler, coauthor of Connected: The Surprising Power of Our Social Networks and How They Shape Our Lives

"Here is a fun counterpoint to the explosion of examples showing that humans do not act in accordance with the predictions of standard rational models. But Kurzban is no defender of the standard models. Rather he seeks an understanding of why our actions may appear contradictory in particular contexts, but serve us well in others, and why that helps to improve our fitness for decision, if not always for a life of liberty."--Vernon L. Smith, Nobel Laureate in Economics

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Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Wir sind alle Heuchler. Sagt zumindest der Autor. Im Zentrum des Problems steht das ICH. Da kann Herr Kurzban, der sonst im Text gerne locker-flapsig daherredet (für meinen Geschmack etwas zu locker, stellenweise), richtig böse werden. Etwa, wenn es um das Thema Selbsttäuschung geht. Dann sagt er (und das im Text mehrfach), dass er gar nicht wisse, was dieses SELBST in jenem Ausdruck denn bitteschön zu bedeuten habe. Das ist eine der Grundthesen des Buches: So etwas wie ein ICH oder SELBST gibt es nicht.
An die Stelle des ICH treten bei Kurzban eine Vielzahl kleinerer Iche. Besser gesagt: Module. Kurzban ist wohl der aktuell entschiedenste Vertreter der sog. Modularitätstheorie in der evolutionären Psychologie. Diese Theorie gibt es in zwei Versionen: eine schwache, und eine starke. Die schwache Version ist im Grunde common sense unter Psychologen. Bekannt ist z.B. das Gesichtserkennungsmodul. Fällt es aus, dann ist man nicht irgendwie teilweise blind, nur Gesichter haben dann keine Gestalt mehr.

Die starke Version, und um die geht es in diesem Buch, geht viel weiter. Die Frage, um die geht, ist: Sind die kognitiven und emotionalen Module hierarisch geordnet, so wie Angestellte einer Firma letztlich dem Big Boss zuarbeiten, welcher seinerseits die Strategie des Unternehmens vorgibt. Entspricht im Menschen das ICH diesem Big Boss? Kurzban sagt: NEIN! Das, was ich als Ich erlebe, ist bei ihm nichts weiter als eine Art 'Pressesprecher', ein Modul unter, bzw. neben anderen, das den Organismus nach außen vertritt.

Was hat das nun mit Heuchelei zu tun ? Laut Kurzban hängt es von der Situation ab, welches Modul gerade 'in charge' ist.
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Describes a theory which, when explained, makes so many other things fall into place. The hallmark of a scientific step forward understandable to laymen and professionals alike. Read this book. It will change your whole weltanschauung
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Amazon.com: 4.3 von 5 Sternen 55 Rezensionen
2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen I think this is one of the first great works of the 21st century 27. Oktober 2015
Von Daniel Capote - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verifizierter Kauf
I think this is one of the first great works of the 21st century. While it does not contain any new theories it neatly and succinctly explains evolutionary psychology basics with beginner friendly examples (at least as friendly as can be for such a dense book). Having said that it is very dense and might not be the best first book on evolutionary psychology for those beginning their studies in evolutionary psychology. Chapter six is very dense and is replete with experiments that have been carried out and may not be easy to understand for beginners in psychological research. One might benefit from reading this book several times as the information becomes easier to understand with multiple readings.
3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen This is one of the best and most important books of today in the field ... 20. Februar 2015
Von DR. PAULO FINURAS - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
This is one of the best and most important books of today in the field of evolutionary psychology (EP) about the new ways of looking at the human brain. It's very well written very clearly and can reach an audience far beyond the experts. Robert Kurzban, in my opinion, is one of the most prominent evolutionary psychologists and his work will remain.
The author shows us how it works our cognitive machinery in a modular perspective angle of the EP and thus helps to finish with some myths and classical visions of the brain and of individual decision-making processes. Worth a read and I strongly recommend.
3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Will Help You Expand Your Way of Thinking 14. Februar 2014
Von R. D. Alexander - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
By using a combination of facts, studies and anecdotes Robert Kurzban gives the reader an introduction of evolutionary psychology. I've only taken a 100 level college course on Psychology so I can't speak to what spectrum of the science it falls on. I did feel that the ideas were sound though and have had success using them to my advantage.

For example: Kurzban likens the brain to an iPhone and the mind to the apps that are loaded on it. You can listen to music while you browse the internet. But you can't play a game and take notes at the same time. Knowing that, it's easy for me to visualize all of my behavior as some routine being run by a part of my mind. If I feel conflicted about something maybe it's because two "apps" are trying to run at the same time. Spending money on $0.69 songs feels good in the moment but not later when I'm reviewing my checking account balance.

If this sounds interesting to you then you should read the book. Robert Kurzban is much better at explaining the reasonings behind it.
72 von 76 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A truly foundational book for anyone serious about Psychology. 24. Februar 2011
Von Amazon Customer - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
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"I" almost didn't purchase this book - what a serious mistake that would have been! Having read The Ego Tunnel: The Science of the Mind and the Myth of the Self by Philosopher Thomas Metzinger, I felt I was thoroughly acquainted with the notion that there is no self. Also, I have read: Predictably Irrational: The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions by Behavioral Economist Dan Ariely, The Happiness Hypothesis: Finding Modern Truth in Ancient Wisdom by Psychologist Jonathan Haidt, and How the Mind Works by Psychologist Steven Pinker (all three cited by Kurzban). Now, I don't mean to name drop, I simply say that to say this: Why Everyone (Else) Is a Hypocrite is better. Yes, better.

Kurzban states in the Prologue, "This book is...an attempt to explain why we act the way we act, and, perhaps partly in our defense, to show that if we are wrong a lot, well, being right isn't everything. My argument is going to be that much, or at least some, of what makes us ignorant, mind-numbingly stupid - and hypocritical - is that we evolved to play many different kinds of strategic games with others, and our brains are built to exploit the fact that being knowledgeable, right, or morally consistent is not always to our advantage. Because humans are such social creatures, while being right is still really important, it's very far from everything. In fact, being ignorant, wrong, irrational, and hypocritical can make you much better off than being knowledgeable, correct, reasonable, and consistent."

The amount of research that Dr. Kurzban utilizes in fulfilling this aim is staggering. There are many classic examples (i.e. Muller-Lyer Illusion, "Spandrels," "Framing Effects") but, also plenty that were new on me. Also, and more importantly, I loved the presentation. Kurzban's style is wry, witty, and always entertaining. I was laughing throughout. I loved the method, the material, and the message. As a long-time fan of evolutionary psychology, this certainly is a welcome addition; Dr. Kurzban is definitely one of my new favorite authors. Also, the new information dovetailed nicely with what I read in Self Comes to Mind: Constructing the Conscious Brain by Antonio Damasio, The Tell-Tale Brain: A Neuroscientist's Quest for What Makes Us Human by V.S. Ramachandran, and Your Brain Is (Almost) Perfect: How We Make Decisions by Read Montague; I just might have to re-read some of my favorites with this new modularity view in mind. In sum, this is a great book and I highly recommend it to anyone interested in morality, Philosophy of Mind, psychology, economics, social policy...well, everyone really. Here is one more great quote, "Modularity explains why everyone is a hypocrite. Moral(istic) modules constrain others' behavior. The mob's moral sticks can be used to prevent an arbitrarily wide set of acts. At the same time, other modules advance our own fitness interests, often by doing the very same acts our moral modules condemn. In this sense, the explanation for hypocrisy lies in the rather quotidian notion of competition. Organisms are designed to advance their own fitness interests, which entails harming others and helping oneself and one's allies. Hypocrisy is, in its most abstract sense, no different from other kinds of competition."
5.0 von 5 Sternen Excellent 23. Februar 2017
Von Josh Zlatkus - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
This book has answers to questions we've been asking and will continue to ask for a long time. It views human inconsistency (including hypocrisy) as the result of our evolved mind, which consists of many distinct "modules" designed to perform specific tasks. Some modules have no knowledge of each other, others are designed to accomplish opposing tasks. According to Kurzban, this is what makes human behavior seem irrational, inconsistent, and at times unpredictable.

So, if you want to move beyond the outdated view of the human being as rational, consistent, and singular, I highly recommend this book. It will immediately change how you conceptualize yourself and the people around you.
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