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am 10. Februar 2015
Jap ernsthaft, dies ist mein Absolutes Lieblingsbuch. Allerdings sollte man es immer im Original lesen. Die Schönheit der Sprache vergeht wenn es nicht im Originaltext ist. Besonders die Deutsche Übersetzung wird nur noch zu einem Einfachen Kinderbuch. Mit Schöner Sprache meine ich besonders den Redefluß. Als ich es das erste mal Laß konnte ich nur jedes zweite Word verstehen habe es aber trotzdem durchgelesen obwohl nur Halb verstanden. Außerdem gibt es einem hohe Kenntnisse im verstehen der englischen Sprache, da man sich schneller mit unbekannten Wörtern und Formulierungen abgibt.
Ich empfehle es aber nicht vor einer Englisch Prüfung zu lesen, da man sonst zu sehr in diesem Alten Englisch ist. Auch wenn es nicht so Wild ist wie bei den Quartermain Büchern.

Zum lernen der Sprache empfehle ich ein Späteres Kinderbuch. Aber für jeden Könner der Sprache ist dies ein Must Have!.
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am 18. Dezember 2012
Habe mehrere Bücher dieser Serie als Geschenk für eine erwachsene Englisch-Lernerin gekauft. Wortschatz und Grammatik sind ideal für jemanden, der sich zwischen Anfänger- und Fortgeschrittenemlevel befindet. Selbstverständlich auch für Englisch-sprachige Kinder wunderbar geeignet! Diese schönen Bücher kommen einfach immer gut an!
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am 20. November 2016
It is a nice story. I could not put the book down. The animals are so splendid!y characterized. You have to dead it.
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Kenneth Grahame (8 March 1859 – 6 July 1932) was a Scottish writer, most famous for The Wind in the Willows (1908), one of the classics of children's literature. He also wrote The Reluctant Dragon; both books were later adapted into Disney films.
In 1908 Grahame retired from his position as secretary of the Bank of England. He moved back to Cookham, Berkshire, where he had been brought up and spent his time by the River Thames doing much as the animal characters in his book do — as one of the most famous phrases from the book says, "simply messing about in boats" — and wrote down the bedtime stories he had been telling his son Alistair.

Main characters:

Mole – A mild-mannered, home-loving animal, and the first character to be introduced. Fed up with spring cleaning in his secluded home, he ventures into the outside world. Originally overawed by the hustle and bustle of the riverbank, he eventually adapts.

Ratty – Ratty (actually a water vole) is cultured, relaxed and friendly, with literary pretentions and a life of leisure. Ratty loves the river and takes Mole under his wing. He is implied to be occasionally mischievous and can be stubborn when it comes to doing things outside of his riverside lifestyle.

Mr. Toad – The wealthy scion of Toad Hall. Good-natured, kind-hearted and not without intelligence, Toad inherited his wealth from his late father. Spoiled, conceited, and impulsive, he is prone to obsessions and crazes (such as punting, houseboats, and horse-drawn caravans), each of which in turn he becomes bored with and drops. His motoring craze eventually sees him imprisoned for theft, dangerous driving and gross impertinence to the rural police. Several chapters of the book chronicle his daring escape from prison.

Mr. Badger – Gruff and solitary, who "simply hates society", Badger embodies the "wise hermit" figure. A friend of Toad's late father, he is uncompromising with the disappointing Toad yet remains optimistic his good qualities will prevail. He lives in a vast underground set, part of which incorporates the remains of a buried Roman settlement. A brave and a skilled fighter, Badger helped clear the Wild Wooders from Toad Hall with his large cudgel.

Otter and Portly – A friend of Ratty with a stereotypical "Cockney costermonger" character, the extrovert Otter is tough and self-sufficient. Portly is his young son.

The Gaoler's Daughter – The only major human character; a "clever, wise, good girl" she helps Toad escape from prison.

The Chief Weasel – The story's antagonist. He and his band of weasels, stoats, and ferrets from the Wild Wood plot to take over Toad Hall.

Inhabitants of the Wild Wood – Weasels, stoats, ferrets, foxes and others, who are described by Ratty thus: "all right in a way... but... well, you can't really trust them".

Pan – A god who makes a single, anomalous appearance in Chapter 7, The Piper at the Gates of Dawn.

The Wayfarer – A vagabond seafaring rat, who also makes a single appearance. Ratty briefly considers following his example, before Mole manages to persuade him otherwise.

Squirrels and rabbits, who are generally good (although rabbits are described as "a mixed lot").

The Wind in the Willows was in its thirty-first printing when then-famous playwright, A. A. Milne, who loved it, adapted a part of it for stage as Toad of Toad Hall in 1929.
It is an absolute Must Read for Young and those who want to remain it!
And - The oh so positive sense remains the same in every edition of this book.
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Kenneth Grahame (8 March 1859 – 6 July 1932) was a Scottish writer, most famous for The Wind in the Willows (1908), one of the classics of children's literature. He also wrote The Reluctant Dragon; both books were later adapted into Disney films.
In 1908 Grahame retired from his position as secretary of the Bank of England. He moved back to Cookham, Berkshire, where he had been brought up and spent his time by the River Thames doing much as the animal characters in his book do — as one of the most famous phrases from the book says, "simply messing about in boats" — and wrote down the bedtime stories he had been telling his son Alistair.

Main characters:

Mole – A mild-mannered, home-loving animal, and the first character to be introduced. Fed up with spring cleaning in his secluded home, he ventures into the outside world. Originally overawed by the hustle and bustle of the riverbank, he eventually adapts.

Ratty – Ratty (actually a water vole) is cultured, relaxed and friendly, with literary pretentions and a life of leisure. Ratty loves the river and takes Mole under his wing. He is implied to be occasionally mischievous and can be stubborn when it comes to doing things outside of his riverside lifestyle.

Mr. Toad – The wealthy scion of Toad Hall. Good-natured, kind-hearted and not without intelligence, Toad inherited his wealth from his late father. Spoiled, conceited, and impulsive, he is prone to obsessions and crazes (such as punting, houseboats, and horse-drawn caravans), each of which in turn he becomes bored with and drops. His motoring craze eventually sees him imprisoned for theft, dangerous driving and gross impertinence to the rural police. Several chapters of the book chronicle his daring escape from prison.

Mr. Badger – Gruff and solitary, who "simply hates society", Badger embodies the "wise hermit" figure. A friend of Toad's late father, he is uncompromising with the disappointing Toad yet remains optimistic his good qualities will prevail. He lives in a vast underground set, part of which incorporates the remains of a buried Roman settlement. A brave and a skilled fighter, Badger helped clear the Wild Wooders from Toad Hall with his large cudgel.

Otter and Portly – A friend of Ratty with a stereotypical "Cockney costermonger" character, the extrovert Otter is tough and self-sufficient. Portly is his young son.

The Gaoler's Daughter – The only major human character; a "clever, wise, good girl" she helps Toad escape from prison.

The Chief Weasel – The story's antagonist. He and his band of weasels, stoats, and ferrets from the Wild Wood plot to take over Toad Hall.

Inhabitants of the Wild Wood – Weasels, stoats, ferrets, foxes and others, who are described by Ratty thus: "all right in a way... but... well, you can't really trust them".

Pan – A god who makes a single, anomalous appearance in Chapter 7, The Piper at the Gates of Dawn.

The Wayfarer – A vagabond seafaring rat, who also makes a single appearance. Ratty briefly considers following his example, before Mole manages to persuade him otherwise.

Squirrels and rabbits, who are generally good (although rabbits are described as "a mixed lot").

The Wind in the Willows was in its thirty-first printing when then-famous playwright, A. A. Milne, who loved it, adapted a part of it for stage as Toad of Toad Hall in 1929.

It is an absolute Must Read for Young and those who want to remain it!
This is the Gratis - Freebie - Version.
Who wants the Illustrated Version has to pay a little bit more...
The sense remains the same in every edition of this book.
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am 8. Oktober 2011
Dem Inhaltsverzeichnis nach fehlen bei dieser Ausgabe drei Kapitel, u.a. The Piper at the Gates of Dawn, in dem Ratte und Maulwurf dem Halbgott Pan begegnen. Dieses Kapitel wurde in so mancher Ausgabe entfernt, wohl wegen seiner heidnischen, naturreligiösen Botschaft. Es ist aber wesentlich für das Buch und erklärt auch den Titel: Wind in the willows. Für den Handlungsstrang um den Kröterich spielt es keine Rolle. Generell würde ich von vereinfachten und gekürzten Versionen wie dieser abraten. Der Zauber des Buches geht dabei verloren, es bleibt nur das Handlungsgerüst.
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am 3. Mai 1998
I was forced by my Mother-who loves these kind of animals stories to read it. I thought it would be easy. I mean come on little rats and moles talking is definately a childrens story. But this was so hard to read! In more than one of the chapters I had no idea what was going on. However it was a well written story it just didn't fit my tastes. My Mom read it and loved it. There were a few good parts. But in the jail the human was as big as the toad. It was very confusing..
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am 6. Januar 2000
Only Kipling's Jungle book, rivals this as the classic talking animal book for children. With his beautiful prose, Grahame evokes laughter, suspense, pleasure and even awe. Water Rat, Mole, Badger, Otter, and the insufferable Toad quickly gain our interest and sympathy. If you buy it to read to children, beware! You may not be able to resist reading ahead a few chapters after you put them to bed. This is a book not to be missed. The scene in which Pan appears as the animals' protector inspired a song by Van Morrison, and a mention in Jane Goodall's book, A Reason for Hope. From it a child of any age will get fun, wonder, and a demonstration of the beautiful possibilities of the English language.
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am 18. März 2014
Die Geschichte handelt vom Maulwurf, der keine Lust auf den Frühjahrsputz hatte und in die Welt auszog und dabei neue Freunde traf. Zusammen mit der Wasserratte beginnt er sich am Fluss heimisch einzurichten und lernt nach und nach die Tiere der Nachbarschaft kennen: Da gibt es den selbstverliebten Kröterich, der keiner technischen Neuerung wiederstehen kann und von einem ins nächste Abenteuer stürzt oder den alten, weisen Dachs, der Maulwurf und Wasserratte das Leben rettet. Gemeinsam erleben die vier die verschiedensten Abenteuer, werden aber immer wieder von Kröterichs törichten Handlungen eingeholt, bis Herr Kröterich den Bogen überspannt.

Grahames Kinderbuchklassiker stammt aus dem Jahre 1908 und erzählt einen Teil seiner eigenen Geschichte. Aufgewachsen bei seiner Großmutter in einem Haus an einem Fluss, begann er als Erwachsener Geschichten über die Tiere, die er bei seinen Bootsauflügen traf, für seinen Sohn aufzuschreiben. Wunderbar geschrieben, vermittelt Grahame Werte, wie Freundschaft, der Glaube an das Gute in einer Person oder Hilfsbereitschaft, und drückt dabei sein humanistisches Weltbild aus. Dass er dabei nicht viel von dem technischen Fortschritt hielt, kommt immer wieder in der Geschichte durch. Wunderbare Naturbeschreibungen schmücken das Buch zusätzlich, machen es aber im Englischen manchmal etwas langatmig. Die ausgefeilten, unterschiedlichen Charaktere gleichen das aber wieder aus.

Fazit: Zu Recht ein Klassiker, den man seinen Kindern vorlesen sollte.
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am 30. November 1999
I was introduced to the denizens of the river when I was very small - maybe age three or four. My edition was illustrated by Arthur Rackham, still the best version to this day, IMO (much as I love Ernest Shepherd's work...)
I still remember being entranced by the juxtaposition of lyrical descriptions and occasionally wild and crazy action, expecially when Mr. Toad was involved - prefect balance for a child, and a terrific introduction to the wonders of the language in the hands of a true master. And one phrase - "Be my eyes, Ratty!" - has stayed with me ever since - that was when I really GOT the idea of helping and selflessness.
I still have my beat-up old book and make sure that all the children of my acquaintance have a good hardback Rackham copy. This classic - forget Disney - is right up there with the original Poohs, and I'm sure it will remain a favorite for generations to come. Do yourself and the children in your life a favor and read it - preferably out loud - and prepare to laugh, smile, shed a tear, and never forget.
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