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am 12. Dezember 2015
zur Zeit der Erstveröffentlichung war das Buch sicherlich eine kleine Sensation, räumte es doch gründlich mit so vielen Vorurteilen der Erwachsenenwelt gegenüber unseren kleinen Kindern auf, und vermittelte uns eine Empfindung, wieviel wir von unseren kleinen Kindern lernen könnten, und mit welcher Ernsthaftigkeit wir ihnen zu begegnen haben.
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am 7. November 1999
I bought this book because, having recently become a father, I wanted to get a better idea of what my baby thinks about and feels from people who make a living studying just that. I also wanted to know how scientists organize and practice the study of infant development; how do you observe an infant's actions and draw information about them based on what they do? (or don't do.) While The Scientist In The Crib is full of a lot of interesting anecdotes, and I certainly wouldn't question the authors' credibility, it is disappointingly organized around very general concepts as opposed to chronology, so that the thread of actual development is difficult to follow from one section to the next. This book really seems more like a series of articles, some more and some less interesting. The chapters examine what children learn about people [chapter 2], things [chapter 3], and then language [chapter 4], and then what scientists have learned about children's minds [chapter 5] and then what scientists have learned about children's brains [chapter 6](the distinction between minds and brains is probably much more meaningful if you're working in the field). There are two different sections entitled 'what newborns know.' I found myself skipping around looking for information relevant to my son and the age that he is now. I suppose if I was not so personally invested in these questions I could examine things in the lofty and generalized manner of this book, but, really, parenting is more a practical than a philosophical pursuit, and a chronological approach would have made the information (and there is a lot) much more accessible and interesting for parents.
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am 18. Februar 2000
The scientist in the crib helps us understand in a new way, not only young babies, but ourselves, who are still trying to understand how the world operates. It helps me enjoy my grandchildren's daily explorations with greater appreciation of their "seriousness." Very well written and humorous as well.
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am 6. März 2000
I found this book to be interesting to read during my son's first year of life. I kept reading things and saying, "Hey, he does that same thing!" The authors' cutsie attempts at humor grew tiresome after the first quarter of the book and by the end I felt it was just saying the same thing over and over.
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am 11. April 2000
I read this book for a book group and began without much interest. I was caught. This is a beautifully crafted piece of writing. Some of the reviewers seem to be treating it as though it were a manual or reference book for young parents. Rather it is an examination of the status of research into the development of the mind -- research at the trickiest and most preconception-filled level, at the level of the youngest brains -- written for anyone interested in how we learn to perceive and make sense of the world around us. The presentation is enlivened by the authors' own observations. Is there a more accessible analysis and ultimate rejection of the whole nature vs. nurture controversy? A wise and wonderful book I have recommended to friends, and I've been thanked for recommending it. Incidentally, I've recommended it to friends who do not have young children, the hardest to interest in books about young children! The science is formidable when you pause to think about it, yet this remains a humane and accessible book.
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This is a fascinating report of research studies that compare the mind of a baby to a computer. The brain is programmed to receive and sort out information from all the senses and to use input from adults and kids to change the program as learning provides new experiences. The authors have done their own research and reviewed other studies about babies and toddlers to back up their analyses of infant learning. Parents and grandparents will be fascinated as they compare the development of young children in their families to the explanations of the infants' "scientific" explorations, classifications, and language learning. You'll find out why everyone talks "motherese" to babies. You'll realize that the kid in the crib is not just lying there waiting for the next diaper or bottle, but is very busy indeed figuring out the world and how it works. A truly fascinating book!
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am 24. Oktober 1999
I'm a mother of six children and thought that I didn't need any more baby books. Then a friend showed me this book and I couldn't put it down. It was the best one I ever read! As a parent, I could see my own children in the book's descriptions. And I laughed at the amusing stories and writing. It's really a terrific way of learning about what your child understands about people, about things, how they learn language, and how experience, including how we parents treat them, affects their brain growth. What a great read, written by these parent-scientists.
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I gave this book to my sister-in-law (a first-time mom to a 6-mth old, in Minneapolis) for her birthday, and it seems to be a hit. She wrote me: "The book is awesome! I'm reading it while 'pumping' at work (20 minutes twice per workday) and it's just been fascinating -- thank you SO much!" I was a little worried that it might be too academic for her taste. But the authors seem to have hit the mark. Not to be missed!
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am 3. März 2000
It seems as though the authors are more interested in name dropping and patting themselves on the back than making the book readable. I found all the outside references distracting and probably unnecessary. Once I was able to get beyond the pandering fluff I found the data interesting and in many cases helpful but it just seemed as though the writers were paying homage to too many outsiders and not enough attention to those of us who bought the book.
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am 4. Januar 2000
Hugely disappointing book that provides little that is fresh, insightful or frankly interesting. I bought this with such high expectations, but there is nothing here an observant parent wouldn't already know.
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