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Strauss, R.: Salome

Strauss, R.: Salome

1. Januar 1999
5.0 von 5 Sternen 1 Kundenrezension

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Strauss, R.: Salome
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Produktinformation

  • Ursprüngliches Erscheinungsdatum : 1. Januar 1999
  • Erscheinungstermin: 1. Januar 1999
  • Anzahl der Disks: 2
  • Label: Chandos
  • Copyright: ℗© 1999 Chandos
  • Gesamtlänge: 1:38:47
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001RU9U62
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 5.0 von 5 Sternen 1 Kundenrezension
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 850.025 in Alben (Siehe Top 100 in Alben)

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Eine rundum gelungene Studioaufnahme. Der Gesang ist wundervoll. Jemand hatte diese Aufnahme in einer Rezension zu einer anderen CD lobend erwähnt, daraufhin habe ich sie bestellt: Glücksgriff!
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Amazon.com: 4.2 von 5 Sternen 12 Rezensionen
7 von 8 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Eerily Fascinating! 25. Januar 2007
Von The Cultural Observer - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verifizierter Kauf
Salome is one of my favorite operas. While it may not have a noble heroine like Brünnhilde, Norma, or Isolde, it has some of the most exotic music and the most well-characterized roles in the entire operatic repertoire. Unfortunately, many of the recordings of Salome in the discography showcase sopranos who may have the ability to handle all the notes, but lack the personality to give the dark, lusty, semi-erotic, and innocent side of this very complex character. Birgit Nilsson may have all the notes of Salome with the thrust and power making for very thrilling above the staff music, but she doesn't have the kitten-ish side which made great Salomes like Ljuba Welitsch famous.

This recording fortunately showcases the talents of Inga Nielsen, a Danish dramatic soprano sadly underrecorded despite her great talents. I have never heard a more exacting performance of Salome with all the nuances of the erotic, sexually charged princess. While she may not have the insights of Catherine Malfitano in the role, she has the requisite tone and the power needed plus a good sense of dynamic marking to deliver in this very difficult role. Her final scene is simply chilling due to the paradox of her innocent voice and her sexual obsession with Jochanaan. A Salome who in every way matches and in some ways exceeds Ljuba Welitsch, I believe Inga Nielsen should be, along with Catherine Malfitano, recommended as reference Salomes.

The supporting cast is magnificent. Robert Hale, Inga Nielsen's real-life husband, sings a very authoritative, epic Jochanaan. He has the vocal size and the power needed to make Jochanaan sound like a noble prophet, and I really like how he controls his large voice to perfect effect in the recording. The rest of the cast is excellent too. Anja Silja sings her signature Herodias, an interpretation with all the thought-out nuances over the years that makes this artist such a miracle. Partnering her is the Herod of Reiner Goldberg, once a wonderful heldentenor voice who gives us a no-nonesense heroic interpretation of Salome's father.

Schønwandt conducts this recording with all the Straussian understanding needed for the score. I would still stick to the Dohnanyi recording for Malfitano, Terfel and Dohnanyi himself, but this is a jewel, and given the magnificent sound, perhaps is an excellent second recording.
2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen a recording that ranks with the greatest-singers, orchestra conductor and sound 19. Oktober 2008
Von herman joseph - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verifizierter Kauf
Go no further for a Salome that is perfect in capturing the smoldering intensity of the Strauss score. The singers are into the nuance, power and electricity that gives an intense lyrical passionate effect which this work demands. Nielsen stands with the great Salome's but also projects the innocence and erotic depravity of the 15 year old biblical princess which others may not be able to find given their their temperaments or voices. All the performers in this cast including Robert Hale give powerful remarkable performances and add to the seething dramatic atmosphere which the conductor conjures with rare color, architecture and insight.
2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Extraordinary! 13. April 2015
Von pekinman - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This recording of Salome from Copenhagen with Inga Nielsen puts me into my old collegiate mode of wanting to write a gigantic and windy thesis on performance practice, on recording, of this amazing opera. But I can't do this. This is Amazon, not a faculty jury. So I will do my best to keep it brief (er). Salome was the first great love of my operatic life, following Wagner, specifically Siegfried (Solti's, my very first opera recording ever), and Verdi's Rigoletto (the one with Sutherland and Pavarotti). I was young and my ears were wide open, and perhaps a little too easily impressed by first impressions, but I was lucky to have some fine recordings at hand when starting out on the long and harrowing road of opera love.

My first Salome was also Solti's with the immortal personification of the title role in the throat of Birgit Nilsson. Perhaps this was unfortunate but the only alternatives at the time were Inge Borkh (Keilberth), Christel Goltz (hitherto unknown by me) and Ljuba Welitsch who I also hadn't heard of so dismissed, then. 45 years on I have become familiar with all the commercial recordings (and many pirates) available of this ground-breaking opera by Richard Strauss. There are quite a few very fine sets to be bought. I have most of them. There are even a handful of Great recordings; the Solti, Karajan (Behrens), Keilberth and Borkh, Dohnanyi and Malfitano, Böhm and Rysanek, and Leinsdorf and Caballé. I would also include ANY pirate recording available with perhaps the greatest Salome of them all, Anja Silja. There is a particularly fine one with her from Vienna in 1965 conducted by Zdenek Kosler on the Myto label.

This set, recorded in superb sound by Chandos in Copenhagen following performances there, is in many ways the ideal number one recommendation for this opera. What makes a great opera is its versatility. There is no One Way to perform the leading roles, in other words. No question, Birgit Nilsson and Solti are volcanic, orgasmic in their powerful partnership of this lurid and still shocking tale. And John Culshaw's technicolor over-the-top production will never be equalled. However, Solti's is one of the most unnatural recordings ever issued in terms of what you can expect to encounter in real life in a real opera house with a mere mortal singing the title role. If you suffer from Birgit-itis, as I did, and have not taken the cure, you will probably not take to Michael Schønwandt's and Inga Nielsen's performance. But if, like me, you have discovered other, less stentorian sopranos in this role, you may find yourself head over heels blown away by Inga Nielsen's Salome. I was.

I recently reviewed Dohnanyi's Salome on Decca with Catherine Malfitano, finding it to be 'fantastic' and 'one of the greats'. I haven't changed my mind there, but having heard Nielsen and Schønwandt again the Dohnanyi/Malfitano must take a definite back seat. Even Karajan/Behrens, the recording on EMI that rescued me from Nilsson-itis decades ago, pales slightly in the face of this Chandos release. The dramatic magnetism of Inga Nielsen and her vocal colleagues under the unerring and imaginative and Subtle direction of Michael Schønwandt eclipses memories of even the most stentorian and overwhelming moments of Nilsson/Solti.

Nielsen's voice is more closely akin to Ljuba Welitch's (which I have heard since my student daze) and Fritz Reiner from the Met in 1952, but sonically it is quite inferior to anything recorded since, though Welitsch is indeed remarkable. A 16 year old Isolde was Strauss's ideal Salome. Welitsch came close, so do Behrens for Karajan and Malfitano for Dohnanyi, but Inga Nielsen NAILS IT!

Nielsen have the power and vocal heft to ride over the orchestral tumult, she also has beauty of tone and, most impressively, a dramatic instinct that equals if not surpasses Anja Silja. And THAT is saying something; Anja Silja, btw, is the terrifying, and not without comic aspect, harridan of a Herodias on this set.

The countless detailed nuances of Inga Nielsen's Salome are too numerous to list and would be boring to read. Suffice it to say that in my long years of listening (and seeing) one of my favorite operas Nielsen's is the most satisfying, fascinating and riveting portrayal I have yet encountered. And by the looks of the current Straussian soprano scene will probably not encounter again in my lifetime.

The supporting cast is, as mentioned, spectacularly graced by Anja Silja's Herodias, and Reiner Goldberg's wonderfully vivid and beautifully sung Herod. For once (!) this role is sung by an experienced Wagnerian tenor in the prime of his vocal life, which lasted much longer than the 'experts' who predicted his demise after Solti booted him out of the infamous Bayreuth Ring (mostly a flop except for Hildegard Behrens' Brünnhilde debut). Goldberg overcame bad and unfair musical press and had a fine career on record and in the greatest opera houses of Europe, also recording a fine Siegfried for Levine. So much for 'experts'!

Schønwandt's smaller, though important, roles are uniformly well-cast. Notably the Narraboth of the late lamented Deon van der Walt who sounded, at that time in 1999, to be well on the road to eventual Lohengrins, Stolzings and Parsifals. And Marianne Rørholm's Page begins her part with Schønwandt's perceptively leisurely and sultry opening temple, singing with beautifully 'in-love' caresses, obviously in love with Narraboth, then with growing alarm (and jealousy) because he looks at Salome too much, finally to outright hysteria as Salome entices Narraboth to show her Jokanaan. The rest is history. The Page was right. Narraboth shouldn't have attempted jumping the fence. It cost him his life.

What sets this set apart from most others is the total dramatic commitment of all of the cast to the core of their characters' natures. These individuals are alive and real in what is usually an opera peopled by caricatures and clichés. Nielsen, especially, does not shy away from a wheedling tone, the spoiled princess, in lieu of pure beauty of sound, which she mostly delivers throughout.

Robert Hale, Nielsen's real life husband at the time, was slightly past his vocal prime as Jokanaan. His vibrato has loosened a bit, though nothing like a wobble, but his powerful, masculine voice has lost nothing in its impact, and he was always a fine vocal actor. His Wotan for Sawallisch (EMI live from Munich in 1999) is one of the very great recordings of that role. He doesn't sound like a young John the Baptist but neither is he one of those Rock of Ages, like Hotter. Nothing wrong with that but it is more Biblical than I care to listen to in this opera.

In the end Nielsen's Salome is deeply moving as she is a young girl who has been badly raised and couldn't help it. And as this opera is partly about Christianity, Nielsen's portrayal readily evokes Compassion (one of the supposed Christian principals).

The Himalaya of tests for conductor and orchestra in this opera is the notorious Dance of the Seven Veils. This piece really is not a very good concert work programmed outside of the context of a complete opera performance, it usually receives a muted response from concert audiences expecting something more lurid, given the opera is comes from. I have performed the Dance of the Seven Veils, no, not as Salome, I wish, but as principal flute in a semi-pro orchestra long ago. It is a viciously difficult piece of composition, not simply because of it's minimalistic nature but the typically Straussian technological challenge of it. And the balance of this beast is composed, largely, in the key of C-sharp, that's seven, count 'em SEVEN sharps. Reading the notes on the page becomes an exercise in potential disaster as every note you see sounds half a tone higher than you expect. Add to this a shower of double-sharp accidentals and the terror is complete! The seven sharps then morph into six flats, (or possibly only 5, can't recall exactly) thereby musically embodying the schizophrenic mood swings of the eponymous heroine. The only way to play this work is by instinct which only comes with years of training. The Dance of the Seven Veils ain't just kitsch. Strauss understood the psychologic impact of tonal centers as well as the best of them. The Dance of the Seven Veils is THE most difficult piece of music I encountered in my years as a pro. If you ever encounter this opera and can see the pit watch the orchestra, their focus and tension level doubles. To bring it off in concert is difficult enough but to carry it off in a full operatic context is a very daunting proposition. Usually the conductor is so exhausted by this point that he, or she, is content simply to Get Through With It and hope that the soprano who is 'dancing' has enough voice left for the volcanic conclusion. Truly, Salome is a monstrous opera.

Schønwandt is similar to Dohnanyi in this bit. He approaches it as a series of Webern-esque gestures. There is no flowing line that runs through it. The dance is prismatic, tenuous and slippery, only gaining velocity and power toward the very end which Schønwandt ends abruptly, violently and dramatically without pause leading into Herod's 'Wunderbar...WUNDERBAR!
In this way the conductor effectively launches the last quarter of the opera on a trajectory of a crazed hallucinogenic vortex of energy that only ends when Salome is crushed by the soldier's shields after her heart-rending and horrifying final scene.

The Danish National Radio Orchestra are on the same par as the Vienna and Berlin Philharmonics, just not as famous, or by-words for excellence in this repertory.

You can't have just one recording of Salome, nor two or three or four. This is definitely in my top five must-haves along with Solti (Birgit Nilsson), Karajan (Hildegard Behrens), Dohnanyi (Catherine Malfitano) and Keilberth (Inga Borkh). The Silja/Kosler live recording on Myto is also essential. Oh, and yes, Leonie Ryanek is also a must-have and she made a gonzo live recording in 1972 at the Vienna State opera conducted by Karl Böhm, available on RCA.
5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen An unexpected treasure of a Salome to rank with finest! 7. Juni 2012
Von D. S. CROWE - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
In my never ending quest for great recordings of Salome, this 1999 release is one I have ignored studiously-until now. I am utterly staggered by its quality and frustrated that I have waited so long to experience its joys.
Although a Chandos release, the recording is by Danish Radio, and features the superb Danish State Radio Orchestra, familiar to us over so many years and so many great recordings, stretching back to the pioneering Sibelius recordings of Erik Tuxen and Thomas Jensen. There is no lack of weight, bloom or richness, but there is a caveat to be entered-the recording is made in a very resonant acoustic, just short of being cavernous, and while this gives an added glow to orchestral tones and aids voices, it also makes the lush orchestration rather diffuse at times, giving an amorphous rather than a forensic sound. The details ARE there, but are somewhat subsumed into a lush tonal wash, but this has it benefits as well. The horns are occasionally recessed as when Jochanaan emerges from the cistern, and later when Herod's ring is taken, but the strings are lush and when Herod is asking Salome what she wants on her silver salver, the ripples on celesta resonate to give a really ethereal effect. It works for me as a different approach.
The conductor, Michael Schoenwandt is very experienced, performing in the great opera houses of Bayreuth, Munich, Vienna and further afield and delivers a truly inspired performance. He knows when to tone down the palette and support the voices, and when to "let rip." Not even Karajan gives us a more beautifully judged performance.
I am full of overwhelming-and unexpected -admiration for the cast.
I am not in general a fan of Robert Hale's gruff Bass Baritone, but here gives the performance of his recording career-powerful, noble, generally steady and very well acted. He is not as mellifluous as van Dam or Milnes, but is in every other respect excellent. Deon van der Walt, more familiar in Mozart, gives us a fine Narraboth in the Ochman mould, supported by a superb Page.
There is a regrettable trend these last years to cast Herodias not with a superb mezzo "at the top of her game", so to speak, such as Resnik or Hoffmann, but rather with a former Heroic Soprano of a certain age. This reached ludicrous extremes this year (2012) when Vienna cast a 76 year old Gwyneth Jones in the role, who, in the performance I attended, staggered through the role both physically and vocally (she did not really sing). Here we have the redoubtable Anja Silja, who gives us a very powerful and dramatic performance but punctuated by some ugly noises as she occasionally tries to sustain a legato that is beyond her-but ugly noises are in a way fitting, and overall her dramatic flair compensates for her reduced vocal abilities, and I like her performance.
The motley of Guards, Jews and Nazarenes is very fine, and includes some names that have gone on to greater things such as Stephen Milling.
Reiner Goldberg's Herod is a triumph-his best performance since Guntram, and arguably the best Herod on disc-as good as that! I loved it. It falls midway between Lewis for Leinsdorf and Stolze for Solti, with steady tone-and SUNG throughout. That leaves Salome. I have no hesitation in pronouncing Inga Nielsen's Salome as the finest of all. Her slightly accented German is very appealing, her crystal voice sounds so young and pure initially, so sexy when she is trying to arouse Jochanaan, the scene where she skittishly teases Herod as to what she wants as her reward for dancing is just so beautifully articulated, so well acted and she produces such limpid clear tone punctuated by bursts of rich steady heights that I am left breathless. Her final scene is so well played out, that while conveying the degenerate corruption, she also conveys a warped innocence so that one feels pity for her in her final moments. The hushed tones with she sings the phrase about "The secret of love is greater than the secret of death" brings a lump to the throat. For me, she surpasses even Behrens and Caballe-I am not an admirer of Nilsson in this role.
Any recommendation has to take into account Titan Recordings by Karajan, Leinsdorf and Solti, and a further excellent selection including Sinopoli and Bohm, but I have no hesitation in placing this firmly in the first trio, now a quartet. A "must hear" for lovers of this work, and first time buyers need not hesitate. I love all the above recordings, and many more, but this is something special and I will return to it as First Choice. Unlimited Stars. Stewart Crowe.
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen An unexpected success from Denmark 2. Februar 2013
Von Ralph Moore - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
For those of us constantly looking for the perfect recording of this macabre masterpiece, there is already a number of very successful and complementary versions, not least those by Karajan, Solti, Leinsdorf and Sinopoli - yet this one still stands out for Inga Nielsen's totally convincing and ultimately chilling assumption of the eponymous role. Despite being over fifty at the time of recording, she has a shimmering, youthful tone which always suggests a precocious teenager and her inflections of the text are constantly nuanced in such a way as to bring it newly alive. Her high notes are like shafts of silver light cutting through the dense orchestration - and she can draw upon a passable lower register when digging in over her demands for the head of the Baptist. Her final scene cradling the head is rivetingly acted and sung.

The other great strength here is the conducting of Michael Schønwandt and the playing he elicits from the Danish National Radio Symphony Orchestra. They are hardly a world-renowned band but they clearly have the measure of the music and play exquisitely. It might be that the resonant acoustic lends an artificial lusciousness to their sound but the results are stunning. That acoustic by no means obscures detail and balances between voices and instruments is ideal.

I am less happy about the Jokanaan. Robert Hale has a large, bluff, rocky bass-baritone which makes him sound more like Salome's elderly uncle than the remote, handsome young man she so erotically depicts. Still, he is a powerful presence with all the notes for all that he cannot suggest the youth and virility conjured up by van Dam, Terfel or Milnes. His cursing of Salome and the subsequent extended orchestral passage is a mighty moment, greatly helped by the intensity of the orchestra's confident playing. I have never warmed to the late Deon van der Walt's white, pinched tenor but he certainly suggests the neurotic obsessive who kills himself over the princess and in whose blood Herod slips in one of them many startling moments in an opera which still has the power to shock and disturb when it is performed with this kind of authority.

Reiner Goldberg and veteran Anja Silja make a superb Mr and Mrs Herod even if she too blares and wobbles on top notes: his grainy tenor is ideal for voicing Herod's ranting, her powerful mezzo replete with scorn and derision for her disturbed husband. The interplay between him and the orchestra when he is attempting to persuade Salome to dance for him is really absorbing; Salome's coolly indifferent spurning of his advances perfectly contrasted with his increasing fervour and desperation. Marianne Rørholm is fine as the Page.

Despite some vocal imperfections this is one of the most dramatically riveting versions I know.
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