Facebook Twitter Pinterest
  • Alle Preisangaben inkl. MwSt.
Nur noch 10 auf Lager (mehr ist unterwegs).
Verkauf und Versand durch Amazon. Geschenkverpackung verfügbar.
Menge:1
The Shallows: What the In... ist in Ihrem Einkaufwagen hinzugefügt worden
+ EUR 3,00 Versandkosten
Gebraucht: Gut | Details
Verkauft von reBuy reCommerce GmbH
Zustand: Gebraucht: Gut
Möchten Sie verkaufen?
Zur Rückseite klappen Zur Vorderseite klappen
Hörprobe Wird gespielt... Angehalten   Sie hören eine Hörprobe des Audible Hörbuch-Downloads.
Mehr erfahren
Alle 3 Bilder anzeigen

The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 27. Mai 2011

4.2 von 5 Sternen 6 Kundenrezensionen

Alle Formate und Ausgaben anzeigen Andere Formate und Ausgaben ausblenden
Preis
Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Kindle Edition
"Bitte wiederholen"
Taschenbuch
"Bitte wiederholen"
EUR 9,99
EUR 8,65 EUR 3,29
76 neu ab EUR 8,65 14 gebraucht ab EUR 3,29
click to open popover

Wird oft zusammen gekauft

  • The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains
  • +
  • Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other
  • +
  • The Glass Cage: Automation and Us
Gesamtpreis: EUR 31,97
Die ausgewählten Artikel zusammen kaufen

Es wird kein Kindle Gerät benötigt. Laden Sie eine der kostenlosen Kindle Apps herunter und beginnen Sie, Kindle-Bücher auf Ihrem Smartphone, Tablet und Computer zu lesen.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

Geben Sie Ihre Mobiltelefonnummer ein, um die kostenfreie App zu beziehen.

Jeder kann Kindle Bücher lesen — selbst ohne ein Kindle-Gerät — mit der KOSTENFREIEN Kindle App für Smartphones, Tablets und Computer.



Produktinformation

Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

The subtitle of Nicholas Carr’s The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains leads one to expect a polemic in the tradition of those published in the 1950s about how rock ’n’ roll was corrupting the nation’s youth ... But this is no such book. It is a patient and rewarding popularization of some of the research being done at the frontiers of brain science ... Mild-mannered, never polemical, with nothing of the Luddite about him, Carr makes his points with a lot of apt citations and wide-ranging erudition.--Christopher Caldwell

The Shallows isn’t McLuhan’s Understanding Media, but the curiosity rather than trepidation with which Carr reports on the effects of online culture pulls him well into line with his predecessor . . . Carr’s ability to crosscut between cognitive studies involving monkeys and eerily prescient prefigurations of the modern computer opens a line of inquiry into the relationship between human and technology.--Ellen Wernecke,

The subtitle of Nicholas Carr's The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains leads one to expect a polemic in the tradition of those published in the 1950s about how rock 'n' roll was corrupting the nation's youth ... But this is no such book. It is a patient and rewarding popularization of some of the research being done at the frontiers of brain science ... Mild-mannered, never polemical, with nothing of the Luddite about him, Carr makes his points with a lot of apt citations and wide-ranging erudition.--Christopher Caldwell

The Shallows isn't McLuhan's Understanding Media, but the curiosity rather than trepidation with which Carr reports on the effects of online culture pulls him well into line with his predecessor . . . Carr's ability to crosscut between cognitive studies involving monkeys and eerily prescient prefigurations of the modern computer opens a line of inquiry into the relationship between human and technology. --Ellen Wernecke,

The Shallows certainly isn't the first examination of this subject, but it's more lucid, concise and pertinent than similar works ... An essential, accessible dispatch about how we think now. --Laura Miller"

Persuasive ... A prolific blogger, tech pundit, and author, [Carr] cites enough academic research in The Shallows to give anyone pause about society's full embrace of the Internet as an unadulterated force for progress . . . Carr lays out, in engaging, accessible prose, the science that may explain these results. --Peter Burrows"

Another reason for book lovers not to throw in the towel quite yet is The Shallows...a quietly eloquent retort to those who claim that digital culture is harmless who claim, in fact, that we're getting smarter by the minute just because we can plug in a computer and allow ourselves to get lost in the funhouse of endless hyperlinks. --Julia Keller"

The subtitle of Nicholas Carr s The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains leads one to expect a polemic in the tradition of those published in the 1950s about how rock n roll was corrupting the nation s youth ... But this is no such book. It is a patient and rewarding popularization of some of the research being done at the frontiers of brain science ... Mild-mannered, never polemical, with nothing of the Luddite about him, Carr makes his points with a lot of apt citations and wide-ranging erudition. --Christopher Caldwell"

You really should read Nicholas Carr's The Shallows . . . Far from offering a series of rants on the dangers of new media, Carr spends chapters walking us through a variety of historical experiments and laymen's explanations on the workings of the brain . . . He makes the research stand on end, punctuating it with pithy conclusions and clever phrasing. --Fritz Nelson"

The Shallows isn t McLuhan s Understanding Media, but the curiosity rather than trepidation with which Carr reports on the effects of online culture pulls him well into line with his predecessor . . . Carr s ability to crosscut between cognitive studies involving monkeys and eerily prescient prefigurations of the modern computer opens a line of inquiry into the relationship between human and technology. --Ellen Wernecke,"

Absorbing [and] disturbing. We all joke about how the Internet is turning us, and especially our kids, into fast-twitch airheads incapable of profound cogitation. It's no joke, Mr. Carr insists, and he has me persuaded. --John Horgan"

Nicholas Carr carefully examines the most important topic in contemporary culture the mental and social transformation created by our new electronic environment. Without ever losing sight of the larger questions at stake, he calmly demolishes the cliches that have dominated discussions about the Internet. Witty, ambitious, and immensely readable, The Shallows actually manages to describe the weird, new, artificial world in which we now live. --Dana Gioia, poet and former Chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts"

Neither a tub-thumpingly alarmist jeremiad nor a breathlessly Panglossian ode to the digital self, Nicholas Carr s The Shallows is a deeply thoughtful, surprising exploration of our frenzied psyches in the age of the Internet. Whether you do it in pixels or pages, read this book. --Tom Vanderbilt, author, Traffic: Why We Drive the Way We Do (and What It Says About Us)"

Ultimately, The Shallows is a book about the preservation of the human capacity for contemplation and wisdom, in an epoch where both appear increasingly threatened. Nick Carr provides a thought-provoking and intellectually courageous account of how the medium of the Internet is changing the way we think now and how future generations will or will not think. Few works could be more important. --Maryanne Wolf, author of Proust and the Squid: The Story and Science of the Reading Brain"

A thought provoking exploration of the Internet s physical and cultural consequences, rendering highly technical material intelligible to the general reader.--The 2011 Pulitzer Prize Committee"

A must-read for any desk jockey concerned about the Web s deleterious effects on the mind."

Starred Review. Carr provides a deep, enlightening examination of how the Internet influences the brain and its neural pathways. Carr s analysis incorporates a wealth of neuroscience and other research, as well as philosophy, science, history and cultural developments ... His fantastic investigation of the effect of the Internet on our neurological selves concludes with a very humanistic petition for balancing our human and computer interactions ... Highly recommended."

This is a measured manifesto. Even as Carr bemoans his vanishing attention span, he s careful to note the usefulness of the Internet, which provides us with access to a near infinitude of information. We might be consigned to the intellectual shallows, but these shallows are as wide as a vast ocean.--Jonah Lehrer"

This is a lovely story well told an ode to a quieter, less frenetic time when reading was more than skimming and thought was more than mere recitation."

Nicholas Carr has written an important and timely book. See if you can stay off the web long enough to read it!--Elizabeth Kolbert, author of Field Notes from a Catastrophe: Man, Nature, and Climate Change

The core of education is this: developing the capacity to concentrate. The fruits of this capacity we call civilization. But all that is finished, perhaps. Welcome to the shallows, where the un-educating of homo sapiens begins. Nicholas Carr does a wonderful job synthesizing the recent cognitive research. In doing so, he gently refutes the ideologists of progress, and shows what is really at stake in the daily habits of our wired lives: the re-constitution of our minds. What emerges for the reader, inexorably, is the suspicion that we have well and truly screwed ourselves.--Matthew B. Crawford, author of Shop Class As Soulcraft

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

Nicholas Carr is the author of The Shallows, a Pulitzer Prize finalist, as well as The Big Switch and Does IT Matter? His articles and essays have appeared in The Atlantic, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Wired, and the New Republic, and he writes the widely read blog Rough Type. He has been writer-in-residence at the University of California, Berkeley, and an executive editor of the Harvard Business Review.


Kundenrezensionen

4.2 von 5 Sternen
Sagen Sie Ihre Meinung zu diesem Artikel

Top-Kundenrezensionen

Format: Kindle Edition Verifizierter Kauf
Einige Rezensenten schreiben hier, der Leser könne selbst entscheiden, was die von Carr zitierten Befunde bedeuten sollen. Das sehe ich anders. Schon der Titel spricht ganz eindeutig von den Verflachungen (Shallows), die das Internet unserem Gehirn antue. Sicher, er lobt die Nützlichkeit des Netzes, und hält es für unsere Gesellschaft als unverzichtbar, aber, je mehr wir es nutzen, desto mehr verblöden wir nach Carr. Diese Kernthese wird durch die intensive Nutzung des "power browsing", des Multitaskings, der Unterbrechungen durch Hyperlinksprünge etc. begründet, der wir offensichtlich zwanghaft (durch ein Belohnungssystem beim Schnipseln im Netz, wo immer wieder Neues zu finden ist) unterliegen. Mit dieser Hochaktivität sei wesentlich das Vorderhirn (Hypocampus) beschäftigt, das für Entscheiden zuständig sei, das dadurch gewissermassen überlastet sei. Diese Überlastung verhindert aber den Verstehensprozess, der nach Kandel und anderen beschworenen Neurowissenschaftlern ein intensiven Austausch zwischen Hypocampus und dem cerbral cortex (für das Langzeitgedächtnis zuständig) erfordere.
Die Neurowissenschaft hat sicher viele spannenden Einzelheiten entdeckt, aber über die Lokalisierung des Gehirnflackerns mit bildgebende Verfahren und bio-chemische Analysen hinaus ist diese Wissenschaft noch meilenweit davon entfernt, zu verstehen, wie das Gehirn denkt, was überhaupt "Verstehen" bedeutet, etc. Die Einsicht, dass ich kaum etwas lernen kann, wenn gleichzeitig Musik läuft, ein Freund anruft, und im Fenster eine spannende Szene zu beobachten ist, scheint mir trivial, dazu brauche ich keine Wissenschaft.
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
1 Kommentar 14 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
Missbrauch melden
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
dass Nicholas Carr recht hat: Die Nutzung des Internets verändert das Gehirn.
Nicholas Carr argumentiert mit der Plastizität des Gehirnes. Er beschreibt, welche physiologischen Änderungen sich im Gehirn durch bestimmte Verhaltensweisen, wie das Lesen eines Buches oder das "Lesen" einer Webseite ergeben. Er stellt dar, dass die Änderungen jeweils verschieden sind.
Dadurch ergeben sich natürlich auch für den jeweiligen "Gehinbesitzer" andere Fertigkeiten und Schwächen.
Ob diese Veränderung eine positive ist oder nicht, muss letztlich jeder Leser für sich selbst entscheiden, dass sie vorhanden ist, erläutert Nicholas Carr sehr verständlich.
Das Buch ist so geschrieben, dass jeder Abiturient es auch auf Englisch lesen können sollte.
Insgesamt ein wichtiges Buch für die Diskussion über die Nutzung von neuen Medien
3 Kommentare 24 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
Missbrauch melden
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
Puh, das war aber doch irgendwie anstrengend, Herrn Carr über fast 300 Seiten zu folgen. Wenn die Nachforschungen von Nicolas Carr stimmen, hat das (auch) damit zu tun, dass ich - wie die meisten Menschen heutzutage - viel Zeit "im" Internet "verbringe".
Im Mittelpunkt von Carrs Buch steht die These, dass das Internet vom Menschen neue Denk- und vor allem neue Lesegewohnheiten fordert. Wobei "fordert" wohl nicht das richtige Wort ist. "Beibringt" würde es wohl eher treffen; wehren kann man sich dagegen nämlich nicht.. Laut Carr verbessern Internetnutzer ihre Fähigkeit, Texte zügig zu überfliegen und gezielt Informationen aus Texten (die via Bildschirm präsentiert werden) herauszufiltern. Einen längeren Text zu lesen - sprich auch ein Buch - wird aber für den modernen Menschen immer schwieriger. Lange Rede kurzer Sinn: Die Konzentrationsspanne verkürzt sich, logischerweise nimmt die Tiefe mit der man sich mit etwas (Carr wagt hier sogar den Schritt weg von reiner Informationsverarbeitung hin zum Privaten) auseinandersetzt ab. Man befindet sich nur noch im "seichten Wasser", also "in the shallows", so auch der Untertitel der englisch Originalversion. Oder um Carr zu zitieren: "Wir kratzen nur noch an der Oberfläche".
Ich habe das Buch auf Englisch gelesen und finde, dass englisch Sachbücher oft lockerer rüberkommen als die deutschen Übersetzungen. Wissenschaft scheint im englischsprachigen Raum wohl insgesamt weniger staubig als in Deutschland zu sein. Das Buch ist mit Schulenglisch "machbar", anstrengen muss man sich aber schon. Carrs Buch hat Längen, manchmal weicht der Autor ein wenig zu weit vom roten Faden ab und verirrt sich ein wenig auf seinen - durchaus spannenden - Exkursen. Aber halt...
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
Kommentar 13 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
Missbrauch melden