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Self-Made Man: One Woman's Year Disguised as a Man von [Vincent, Norah]
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Self-Made Man: One Woman's Year Disguised as a Man Kindle Edition

3.8 von 5 Sternen 9 Kundenrezensionen

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EUR 9,52

Länge: 312 Seiten Word Wise: Aktiviert Verbesserter Schriftsatz: Aktiviert
PageFlip: Aktiviert Sprache: Englisch

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Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

"Mass-market paperback outing for the most talked about book of 2006: 'an addictive, enthralling read' (Viv Groskop, Observer) * 'Intelligent, articulate and perceptive... one of the most sympathetic renderings of masculinity you're likely to read.' Lionel Shriver, The Guardian * 'Funny, compelling and human' The Times * 'This captivating account will forever change the way you see men - and perhaps yourself' Marie Claire * 'Thoughtful, entertaining...fascinating' New York Times Book Review 'Beautifully written... a brave and fascinating book.' Christopher Hart, Sunday Times"

Kurzbeschreibung

A journalist’s provocative and spellbinding account of her eighteen months spent disguised as a man

Norah Vincent became an instant media sensation with the publication of Self-Made Man, her take on just how hard it is to be a man, even in a man’s world. Following in the tradition of John Howard Griffin (Black Like Me), Norah spent a year and a half disguised as her male alter ego, Ned, exploring what men are like when women aren’t around. As Ned, she joins a bowling team, takes a high-octane sales job, goes on dates with women (and men), visits strip clubs, and even manages to infiltrate a monastery and a men’s therapy group. At once thought- provoking and pure fun to read, Self-Made Man is a sympathetic and thrilling tour de force of immersion journalism.


Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 651 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 312 Seiten
  • Verlag: Penguin Books; Auflage: Reprint (19. Januar 2006)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B000OT8GTE
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Aktiviert
  • Verbesserter Schriftsatz: Aktiviert
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 3.8 von 5 Sternen 9 Kundenrezensionen
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: #188.361 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop (Siehe Top 100 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop)

  •  Ist der Verkauf dieses Produkts für Sie nicht akzeptabel?

Kundenrezensionen

3.8 von 5 Sternen

Top-Kundenrezensionen

Format: Taschenbuch
One of the most impressive books I have ever read is Black Like Me by John Howard Griffin. Following Mr. Griffin as he moved across his day's color line to see how his skin color changed the reactions he experienced created a searing memory for me. It was my respect for that book that brought me to Self-Made Man.

Norah Vincent's transformation from tall gay woman into a somewhat effeminate appearing man provides a very powerful reading experience as well. You have both gender and sexual orientation differences here to deal with. I admire her thoroughness and courage. The disguise preparations were extensive (down to a simulated beard and false frontal appendage), training in how to walk and talk, and research into male culture.

Many people would have been satisfied with taking on easy challenges: Ms. Vincent clearly pushed herself. She went into environments where many men wouldn't feel fully comfortable: a bowling team of friends while having little skill; working class stripper bars; dating women who have been hurt and haven't recovered; staying at a monastery; working in door-to-door sales; and a men's retreat. As a result, you see many dimensions of social class and religious differences as well.

Her observations obviously reflect who she is. She longed to build real connections to the people she fooled, but suffered from a great fear of a hostile reaction. Instead, people accepted her for who she appeared to be and were gracious when she revealed the end of her masquerade.

In her writing, I only noticed a few false notes. Some of what she's trying to experience probably depends in part on hormonal reactions so I'm not sure she fully grasped the stripper scene (but how could she?).
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Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
Startet sehr interessant, tolle Idee, hat man so noch nicht so oft gelesen.
Beginnt spannend, viele Beschreibungen bringen einen sehr zum Nachdenken.
Leider verliert sich die Autorin gegen Mitte des Buches in ewig langen Beschreibungen (zB im Kloster), Freundschaftsbeziehungen etc. und verliert so das Gesamtkonzept Mann-Frau-Gender aus den Augen. Sehr zäh und etwas öde.
Schade.
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
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Format: Taschenbuch
One of the most impressive books I have ever read is Black Like Me by John Howard Griffin. Following Mr. Griffin as he moved across his day's color line to see how his skin color changed the reactions he experienced created a searing memory for me. It was my respect for that book that brought me to Self-Made Man.

Norah Vincent's transformation from tall gay woman into a somewhat effeminate appearing man provides a very powerful reading experience as well. You have both gender and sexual orientation differences here to deal with. I admire her thoroughness and courage. The disguise preparations were extensive (down to a simulated beard and false frontal appendage), training in how to walk and talk, and research into male culture.

Many people would have been satisfied with taking on easy challenges: Ms. Vincent clearly pushed herself. She went into environments where many men wouldn't feel fully comfortable: a bowling team of friends while having little skill; working class stripper bars; dating women who have been hurt and haven't recovered; staying at a monastery; working in door-to-door sales; and a men's retreat. As a result, you see many dimensions of social class and religious differences as well.

Her observations obviously reflect who she is. She longed to build real connections to the people she fooled, but suffered from a great fear of a hostile reaction. Instead, people accepted her for who she appeared to be and were gracious when she revealed the end of her masquerade.

In her writing, I only noticed a few false notes. Some of what she's trying to experience probably depends in part on hormonal reactions so I'm not sure she fully grasped the stripper scene (but how could she?).
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
Kommentar 2 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
Missbrauch melden
Format: Taschenbuch
One of the most impressive books I have ever read is Black Like Me by John Howard Griffin. Following Mr. Griffin as he moved across his day's color line to see how his skin color changed the reactions he experienced created a searing memory for me. It was my respect for that book that brought me to Self-Made Man.

Norah Vincent's transformation from tall gay woman into a somewhat effeminate appearing man provides a very powerful reading experience as well. You have both gender and sexual orientation differences here to deal with. I admire her thoroughness and courage. The disguise preparations were extensive (down to a simulated beard and false frontal appendage), training in how to walk and talk, and research into male culture.

Many people would have been satisfied with taking on easy challenges: Ms. Vincent clearly pushed herself. She went into environments where many men wouldn't feel fully comfortable: a bowling team of friends while having little skill; working class stripper bars; dating women who have been hurt and haven't recovered; staying at a monastery; working in door-to-door sales; and a men's retreat. As a result, you see many dimensions of social class and religious differences as well.

Her observations obviously reflect who she is. She longed to build real connections to the people she fooled, but suffered from a great fear of a hostile reaction. Instead, people accepted her for who she appeared to be and were gracious when she revealed the end of her masquerade.

In her writing, I only noticed a few false notes. Some of what she's trying to experience probably depends in part on hormonal reactions so I'm not sure she fully grasped the stripper scene (but how could she?).
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
Kommentar Eine Person fand diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
Missbrauch melden
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