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Romantic Piano Concerto Vol.53


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Audio-CD, 1. April 2011
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Produktinformation

  • Orchester: Rundfunk-Sinfonieorchester Berlin
  • Dirigent: Ilan Volkov
  • Komponist: Max Reger, Richard Strauss
  • Audio CD (1. April 2011)
  • Anzahl Disks/Tonträger: 1
  • Label: Hyperion Records (Note 1 Musikvertrieb)
  • ASIN: B004NWHV58
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  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 174.323 in Musik (Siehe Top 100 in Musik)
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Produktbeschreibungen

Produktbeschreibungen

Reger : Concerto pour piano, op.114 - Strauss : Burleske / Marc-André Hamelin, piano - Rundfunk-Sinfonieorchester Berlin - Ilan Volkov, direction

Rezension

Fire and beauty:imposing concertos revived by just the right personnel. --Gramophone,May'11

A debt to Brahms is acknowledged in both these pieces, brilliantly played by Marc-André Hamelin, who battles manfully through the emotional thicket of Max Reger's sprawling, dramatic piano concerto, which received such a hammering from the critics in 1910 that Reger took to drink. A century on it certainly seems unwieldy and melodramatic but hardly the horror it was thought to be at the time. Richard Strauss's mercurial Burleske makes a pleasant antidote to Reger's high seriousness, with the Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra in cracking form. --The Observer,10/04/11

The Reger, as one might anticipate, is a heavy-duty work, far outdoing Brahms in its weighty sonorities. Reger described his piano concerto as a pendant to Brahms's First in D minor, and it is easy to detect the points of contact. But detrimentally, Reger seemed to regard density of notes as ends in themselves. There are welcome passages where he lets up and, in the slow movement, where he meditates quietly. In the finale he becomes playful in a solid sort of way, but the effort that must go into executing the piece is scarcely matched by anything that fixes the concerto with any permanence in the memory. Strauss's Burleske, an early work that makes obeisance to Brahms's Second Concerto in B flat, is much more fun, pointing to elements of Strauss's mature style and displaying a bravura of orchestral writing that was soon to become a hallmark of Don Juan . Both works are brilliantly performed by both pianist and orchestra, the Strauss adding a refreshing sorbet after the hefty meal of the Reger. *** Classical CD of the week --Daily Telegraph,01/04/11

Hamelin gives one of the most stylish and elegent account of it I've heard,pointing up the warm lyricism of the waltz-episode and setting the sparkling wit of Strauss in scintilating contrast to the earthy humour of his fellow-Bavarian,Reger. Performance **** Recording ***** --BBC Music Magazine,May'11

Next to Hamelin's capricious reading,Byron Janis's classic account seems dogged and even Richter's seems slightly unkempt. Strongly recommended. --IRR,Apr'11

Hamelin gives one of the most stylish and elegent account of it I've heard,pointing up the warm lyricism of the waltz-episode and setting the sparkling wit of Strauss in scintilating contrast to the earthy humour of his fellow-Bavarian,Reger. Performance **** Recording ***** --BBC Music Magazine,May'11

Next to Hamelin's capricious reading,Byron Janis's classic account seems dogged and even Richter's seems slightly unkempt. Strongly recommended. --IRR,Apr'11

Volume 53 of Hyperion's Romantic Piano Concerto series contains two post-Romantic works linked by demands for exceptional virtuosity, but poles apart in mood. Reger's Concerto in F Minor (1910) is a gaunt, tragic statement that shoulders the immeasurable weight of tradition in its recollections of Brahms, Liszt, Wagner and, above all, Bach, Reger's great hero. The Burleske (1886), in contrast, is Strauss's first comedy a flippant, parodic piece that peers forward to the postmodern ironies of Till Eulenspiegel and beyond. Hearing them together produces a few surprises. Reger is usually castigated for prolixity, though the Concerto doesn't seem to contain a wasted note, and it's the Burleske that comes over as diffuse and occasionally repetitive. Reger's fierce chromatic counterpoint, ratcheting up the anguish, now strikes us as far more disquieting than Strauss's spiky harmonies, which were deemed ultra-modern in his day. Both performances are formidable. Marc-André Hamelin does powerhouse things with the Reger, and is notably harrowing in the great central largo. The skittish charm with which he plays the Burleske, meanwhile, belies its often atrocious difficulty. Ilan Volkov and the Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra are first rate. ***** --The Guardian,05/05/11

Next to Hamelin's capricious reading,Byron Janis's classic account seems dogged and even Richter's seems slightly unkempt. Strongly recommended. --IRR,Apr'11

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