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Rabid: A Cultural History of the World's Most Diabolical Virus (Englisch) Gebundene Ausgabe – 19. Juli 2012

3.0 von 5 Sternen 5 Kundenrezensionen

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Produktinformation

Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

“A searing narrative.”
—The New York Times
 
“In this keen and exceptionally well-written book, rife with surprises, narrative suspense and a steady flow of expansive insights, ‘the world’s most diabolical virus’ conquers the unsuspecting reader’s imaginative nervous system. . . . A smart, unsettling, and strangely stirring piece of work.”
—San Francisco Chronicle
 
“Fascinating. . . . Wasik and Murphy chronicle more than two millennia of myths and discoveries about rabies and the animals that transmit it, including dogs, bats and raccoons.”
—The Wall Street Journal
 
Rabid delivers the drama of Louis Pasteur’s courageous work developing the rabies vaccine at the same time it details the disease’s place in our cultural history, taking us from Homer to the Bronte sisters to Zora Neale Hurston to Richard Matheson. . . . All along the book’s prose and pace shine—the book is as fast as the virus is slow.”
—The Seattle Times
 
“A very readable, fascinating account of a terrifying disease….Wasik and Murphy grippingly trace the cultural history of the disease. . . . Rabid reminds us that the disease is a chilling, persistent reminder of our own animal connections, and of the simple fact that humans don’t call all of the shots.”
—The Boston Globe
 
“Compelling. . . . Murphy and Wasik give life, context and understanding to the terrifying disease. Like the virus itself, this fascinating book moves quickly, exploring both the marginalized status and deadly nature of the virus. And as the authors trace the influence of rabies through history, Rabid becomes nearly impossible to put down.”
—New Scientist
 
“An elegant exploration of the science behind one of the most horrible way to die.”
—Chris Anderson, author of The Long Tail
 
“This book is not for the squeamish. Yet those who are fascinated by how viruses attack the body, by the history of vaccination and by physicians’ efforts to save the most desperately ill patients will want to read it. There is also a happy ending: scientists are working to harness rabies as a potent drug delivery vehicle.”
—Scientific American
 
“[Wasik and Murphy] offer an in-depth look at a disease so insidious that it even turns our best friends—dogs—against us. The pair convincingly link the history of rabies…with the history of man’s fear of nature and the unknown, and our own latent capacity for beastliness.”
—The Daily Beast
 
“Thrilling, smart, and devilishly entertaining, Rabid is one of those books that changes your sense of history—and reminds us how much our human story has been shaped by the viruses that live among us.”
—Steven Johnson, author of The Ghost Map
 
“Rabies has always been as much metaphor as disease, making it an excellent subject for cultural history. . . . As Wasik and Murphy document . . . the horror of rabies has been with us since the beginning of human civilization.”
—Bookforum
 
“Funny and spry. . . . It’s a rare pleasure to read a nonfiction book by authors who research like academics but write like journalists.”
—Alice Gregory, n+1
 
 “Readable, fascinating, informative, and occasionally gruesome, this is highly recommended for anyone interested in medical history or the cultural history of disease.”
Library Journal (starred review)
 
“Take Bill Wasik, one of our most perceptive journalistic storytellers, have him join forces with Monica Murphy, scholar of public health, and you end up with this erudite, true-life creep show of a book. It turns out that the rabies virus is a good bit more fascinating and at least as frightening as any of those blood-thirsty monsters that have stalked our fairy tales, multiplexes, and dreams.”
—Donovan Hohn, author of Moby Duck
 
“Ambitious and smart.”
—Publisher’s Weekly
 
“Terrible virus, fascinating history in Rabid.”
—NPR
 
“As entertaining as they are on rabies in culture, the authors also eruditely report on medicine and public health issues through history, from ancient Assyria to Bali to Manhattan in the last five years, showing that while the disease may be contained, it may never be fully conquered. Surprisingly fun reading about a fascinating malady.”
—Kirkus Reviews
 
“The ultimate weird dad book.”
—Very Short List
 
“The rabies virus is a microscopic particle of genes and proteins. And yet it has cast a fearful shadow over all of human history. Bill Wasik and Monica Murphy have produced an eerily elegant meditation on disease and madness, dogs and vampires. It's as infectious as its subject.”
—Carl Zimmer, NPR contributor and author of Parasite Rex
 
 “A fun read, rivaling a Stephen King novel for page-turning thrills.”
—The Awl

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

Bill Wasik is a senior editor at Wired and was formerly a senior editor at Harper’s; he writes on technology, media, and crowd dynamics. Monica Murphy holds degrees in public health from Johns Hopkins University and in veterinary medicine from the University of Minnesota. They are married and live with their son and whippet in Oakland, California.

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3.0 von 5 Sternen
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Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Many a virus has left its fatal mark on us throughout history, but none is as deeply steeped in legend as the most fatal of them all, the rabies virus. In Rabid Bill Wasik and Monica Murphy present an all-encompassing survey on the topic - from the early days to mythology, from literature to the latest in medicine.
At first glance you might get the impression that the focus in the book is heavily on the medical aspect, yet the authors offer a multifaceted depiction, delving into various areas on which rabies has left an impact throughout history. Filled with lots of facts it is mostly the intriguing background knowledge which made this book such an enjoyable read for me. Needless to say, my favorite part was the one dealing with how the disease found its way into literature, where aspects, or rather symptoms and beliefs about it, helped form creatures such as vampires, werewolves and even zombies.
Admittedly this has been the only book I ever read on this subject, so I'm not sure whether those who are familiar with it would find it lacking in some regard. However, to me, it proved to be just the right amount of information about the virus which is, after so many centuries, still at large. ... as are the creatures it has inspired in many a horror movie.
In short: Everything you ever wanted to know about rabies packed into an entertaining and absorbing read!

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the NetGalley book review program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.
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Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
"Rabid" is certainly an interesting attempt to summarize mankind's sometimes all too intimate relationship with the (medically) fascinating rabies virus.

It does cover all the important points and the parts of this book actually directly related to rabies (e.g. Pasteur's development of a vaccine, the Bali outbreak, the experimental "Milwaukee" treatment) are without question a good read. Unfortunately those story lines wouldn't have been enough for a (generally understandable) book of this length and the information contained in those parts does not exceed what you could find out yourself with a few Google searches.

So, regrettably, the book was filled with a plethora of circumstantial information, most importantly a quite detailed history of how dogs became mankind's most abiding partners or an extensive coverage of other zoonoses.

In the end, it's not really a horrible book, but I don't really see the target audience for this unshaped heap of unrelated information. If you are truly interested in rabies, save your money and conduct a web research.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verifizierter Kauf
Well-researched and heavily historic book. It was eye-opening to understand where all the fantasy hypersexual-and-biting-vampire stories truly originate from: a much darker, crueler, microbiologic horror story. I found Chapter 7: The Survivors and Conclusion: The Devil, Leashed, particularly a joy to read.
One thing that really stung me though about the survivor's story of a 15y-old girl, was that the question of fault was never even brought up, neither at the time being nor retrospectively by the authors! I strongly assume that, with todays availability of vaccines being heavily recommended by ANY people of sane minds, the victim's parents flat-out refused to vaccinate her as a baby and young child. How else could she have fallen sick from rabies? Their religiousness and her father's blind and, statistically speaking, totally nonsensical belief in her survival strongly back my assumption. Consciously not vaccinating your child and deliberately risking her croak from rabies, or, as it turned out, narrowly surviving and needing years of rehabilitation to gain back basic skills like swallowing, moving, walking, talking ... in my opinion that's malicious wounding, and the parents should not be granted to play the role of the tearful, caring, desperately loving parent, but should be called and persecuted upon that by their incredible foolishness and hubris they very narrowly killed their daughter. This very uncritical - and maybe very American - attitude toward parents really stings me! I feel sorry for any child having to suffer terribly from parents lost in their own hubris and stupidity.
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Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
Um ehrlich zu sein hat mich das Buch enttäuscht. Richtig interessant sind erst die letzten Kapitel. Vieles, was die Autoren zum Thema "Kulturgeschichte der Tollwut" schreiben fand ich an den Haaren herbeigezogen oder sehr frei interpretiert.
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Habe nach einem Vorfall in Thailand und der Impfkampagne danach begonnen, mich in der Thema Tollwut einzulesen und bin auf eine reißerische Spiegel-Rezension über dieses Buch gestolpert. Also, die Rezension wird dem Buch nicht gerecht, es ist eher ein Rückblick auf die Kulturgeschichte der Tollwut, und das muss einen halt interessieren. Null Sterne für das Gebrabbel im Spiegel, drei fürs Buch, das doch irgendwie zur Allgemeinbildung beiträgt. Und irgendwie in der zweiten Hälfte auch spannend ist.
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