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Pride and Platypus: Mr. Darcy's Dreadful Secret (English Edition) von [Austen, Jane, Nazarian, Vera]
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Pride and Platypus: Mr. Darcy's Dreadful Secret (English Edition) Kindle Edition


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Länge: 500 Seiten Word Wise: Aktiviert Sprache: Englisch

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Produktbeschreibungen

Kurzbeschreibung

From the critically acclaimed author of Mansfield Park and Mummies and Northanger Abbey and Angels and Dragons...

Pride and Platypus: Mr. Darcy’s Dreadful Secret

When the moon is full over Regency England, all the gentlemen are subject to its curse.


Mr. Darcy, however, harbors a Dreadful Secret...


Shape-shifting demons mingle with Australian wildlife, polite society, and high satire, in this elegant, hilarious, witty, insane, and unexpectedly romantic supernatural parody of Jane Austen's classic novel.

The powerful, mysterious, handsome, and odious Mr. Darcy announces that Miss Elizabeth Bennet is not good enough to tempt him. The young lady determines to find out his one secret weakness -- all the while surviving unwanted proposals, Regency balls, foolish sisters, seductive wolves, matchmaking mothers, malodorous skunks, general lunacy, and the demonic onslaught of the entire wild animal kingdom!

What awaits her is something unexpected. And only moon, matrimony, and true love can overcome pride and prejudice!

Gentle Reader -- this Delightful Illustrated Edition includes Scholarly Footnotes and Appendices.

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

One of England s most beloved authors, Jane Austen wrote such classic novels as Pride and Prejudice, Sense and Sensibility, Emma, and Northanger Abbey. Published anonymously during her life, Austen s work was renowned for its realism, humour, and commentary on English social rites and society at the time. Austen s writing was supported by her family, particularly by her brother, Henry, and sister, Cassandra, who is believed to have destroyed, at Austen s request, her personal correspondence after Austen s death in 1817. Austen s authorship was revealed by her nephew in A Memoir of Jane Austen, published in 1869, and the literary value of her work has since been recognized by scholars around the world.

Nazarian left the former Soviet Union at the height of the Cold War, a refugee at the age of eight, and arrived in the U.S. a month before her 10th birthday. She is an active member of Science Fiction Writers of America.

Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 1147 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 500 Seiten
  • Gleichzeitige Verwendung von Geräten: Keine Einschränkung
  • Verlag: Curiosities (Imprint of Norilana Books) (20. Juni 2012)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B008D303J4
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Aktiviert
  • Verbesserter Schriftsatz: Nicht aktiviert
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: Schreiben Sie die erste Bewertung
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: #429.415 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop (Siehe Top 100 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop)

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Amazon.com: HASH(0x8fae86b4) von 5 Sternen 20 Rezensionen
12 von 13 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
HASH(0x8fb230a8) von 5 Sternen Whimsey and Worry 14. August 2012
Von tontine - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verifizierter Kauf
I was expecting Pride and Platypus to be whimsical and a very fast read, and it did not disappoint. Dearest loveliest Elizabeth needs a short course in logic, and Mr. Darcy . . . well, he is of course above his critics. The number of unexpected loops and turns kept me reading way past bedtime. In many ways the novel was predictable but there were plenty of laughs to make one keep reading. The format was not suitable for Kindle, as the end notes were frequent and annoying. I read them all at the end of the novel, and found them, um, unusual.
8 von 8 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
HASH(0x8fd5d3cc) von 5 Sternen Wonderful sense of the absurd 11. August 2012
Von Amazon Customer - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verifizierter Kauf
I had read Northanger Abbey & Angels & Dragons by the same author and had found it appealing in its humour and sense of the absurd, Pride & Platypus is much the same taking the essentials of the original narrative and adding a witty and satisfying twist. Possibly not for Jane Austen purists, but those of us who love the originals and the variations should all get a good few hours enjoyment.
6 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
HASH(0x8fb2ead4) von 5 Sternen Wonderfully fun, very enjoyable for fans of satire, cross-genre mashups and Jane Austen fans! 14. Januar 2013
Von K. Sozaeva - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verifizierter Kauf
This review is best viewed on my blog, where illustrations and formatting can break it up for you a bit. Please visit my blog (a link is in my profile) and see the full gloriousness of this review!

A plain-text version of my review follows.

Book Info: Genre: Classical literature satire
Reading Level: Adult
Recommended for: Fans of Jane Austen, satire, cross-genre mashups
Trigger Warnings: Demons beasts! Giant, murderous DUCKS!! And a truly horrible creature called a platypus.

Disclosure: I picked up a copy of this book from Amazon during a free promotion because I so enjoyed the book Northanger Abbey and Angels and Demons. No review has been requested. All opinions are my own.

Synopsis: "When the moon is full over Regency England, all the gentlemen are subject to its curse.

Mr. Darcy, however, harbors a Dreadful Secret..."

Shape-shifting demons mingle with Australian wildlife, polite society, and high satire, in this elegant, hilarious, witty, insane, and unexpectedly romantic supernatural parody of Jane Austen's classic novel.

The powerful, mysterious, handsome, and odious Mr. Darcy announces that Miss Elizabeth Bennet is not good enough to tempt him. The young lady determines to find out his one secret weakness--all the while surviving unwanted proposals, Regency balls, foolish sisters, seductive wolves, matchmaking mothers, malodorous skunks, general lunacy, and the demonic onslaught of the entire wild animal kingdom!

What awaits her is something unexpected. And only moon, matrimony, and true love can overcome pride and prejudice!

"Gentle Reader--this Delightful Illustrated Edition includes Scholarly Footnotes and Appendices."

My Thoughts: Like Northanger Abbey and Angels and Demons (my review here where formatting allowed), this is a delightful mock-up of the original, or at least I assume so, because also like that one, I have not actually read the original version of Pride and Prejudice, or if I have, I have successfully managed to suppress all memory of it. After reading this excellent satire, I feel I have done myself a grave injustice and am more determined than ever to seek out and read as much Jane Austen as I can, as the story, even buried under satire, was really quite charming and left me with a smile on my face. A more voluble expression of love I have never heard than, "Dearest Elizabeth... There is something different about the world; can you suddenly feel it?"

Early on in the book it is noted that the Affliction to which the men of Regency England were subjected caused them to:

"...take on various unnatural shapes--neither quite demon, nor proper beast--and in those shapes to roam the land; to hunt, murder, dismember, gorge on blood, consume haggis and kidney pie, gamble away their familial fortune, marry below their station (and below their stature, when the lady is an Amazon), vote Whig, perform sudden and voluntary manual labor, cultivate orchids, collect butterflies and Limoges snuff boxes, and perpetrate other such odious evil--unless properly contained."

That is, indeed, a great deal of odious evil. Especially the haggis and kidney pie! (Locations 207-213 and 213-217 in Kindle edition)

This gives you a bit of an idea about the hilariousness of this book! The idea of men going through a monthly Affliction, and the way they use it as another bragging point, building and/or buying cages and crates and chains... and typical overcompensation as to their various sizes. I love the way the author has taken the notion and just run with it to extreme (and extremely funny) lengths. The same with the absurd Mr. Collins and his ridiculous ideas about crossbreeding native Australian fauna with British, such as the kangaroo with goats. It was almost beaten to death, but it was hilarious. Also some of the ideas people had about the origins of such animals was very funny, such as the description of a platypus as "the natural offspring of a duck, otter, beaver, snake, crocodile, gazelle, porcupine, and, I am told, a watercress-fed water buffalo--"

There is a bit of a problem with typos littering the book. I saw "tired" for "tried," "game" for "gave, "wrecked" `for "wreaked", and "bread" for "bred" among others. Most of them I skipped right over, but the "bread/bred" one was particularly ironic, since it was talking about how the Brighton Duck was "bread" for ferocity and monstrousness or some-such. That one made me laugh quite a lot, as I thought to myself, "I daresay she means `bred', for whilst a duck might eat `bread', they are nonetheless `bred' from one generation to the next." Then I laughed some more at how I'd unconsciously picked up the wording style of the book. I laughed again later in remembrance when Mr. Collins began his ridiculous rants about crossbreeding Australian fauna with British.

The dueling-editors thing was something that wasn't quite pulled off to full effect, in this reader's humble opinion. There were some moments of true hilarity, it is true, but some of them felt forced. I think the ones where the editors are basically just talking to each other could have been excised and that would have felt better to me. I certainly wouldn't recommend skipping them, because some of them are pure comedy gold, such as footnote 62 regarding the nature of a preservative, but if it annoys you to flip back and forth, even using an e-reader, then maybe save some of them for the end? Another instance in which I feel the ball was dropped was the spoken language of the various characters. Overall it was very good, but there was the profligate use of "got" and "get" within the speech patterns that I cannot help but believe was not at all common among the people of the time.

At the risk of making an already-long review ever longer, I wanted to comment in general about how the world has changed in 200 years! Consider in Regency England a tan was considered "coarse," yet today we are considered "sickly looking" if we are too pale. Not to mention how the use of the language has changed (deteriorated in my own opinion) from the gracious gentility of the time. Again in my opinion, reverting somewhat to a more lovely use of the language, rather than the hurried and ugly version we use today, would do nothing but improve the world overall.

Overall, I really enjoyed this book a lot. Any flaws were minor and easily overlooked for the most part. Again there were a few drawings scattered through the book, showcasing this author's many talents. I believe Nazarian did the spirit of Jane Austen justice in this satire, with love and laughter, so fans of Jane Austen's work ought to enjoy this. Fan of cross-genre mock-ups and satires will also want to be certain to read this wonderful story. Highly recommended!
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HASH(0x8fbe32d0) von 5 Sternen Pride & Prejudice Meets the Paranormal 14. Mai 2013
Von Sophia Rose - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
Okay, I need to stop laughing and 'ahhing'. This was such a funny and cute take on Jane Austen's Pride & Prejudice. It mooshes 'tongue firmly in cheek' paranormal with the original Pride & Prejudice writing. I'm not going to bother summarizing the story because it pretty much follows the P&P storyline faithfully with just the insertion of the male Affliction. More about that in a moment. I'm just going to highlight the paranormal element which was cute and creative in its way.

This P&P story retelling assumes that all the men are cursed with an Affliction where at puberty they start changing into a demon animal during the nights of the full moon or when under extreme duress. The male's animal is usually determined by heredity and the type of animal influences class status to a certain extent. There is a whole cultural thing with it where ladies admire a gentleman's cage and locks for his cage and his animal as much as they do his human trappings of birth, status and income. There is a stigma attached to not turning into a noble beast as opposed to a lesser creature. Oh, and the male's personality is influenced by his beast particularly when it is near the full moon time.

With all that in mind, it was fun to learn what each male character's beast was. Mr. Bennet was an indolent lion, Bingley was a pacing tiger, Wickham was a wolf, Mr. Collins- well lets just say it was hilarious when it was revealed. Darcy's beast is revealed fairly early on too, but it is his biggest secret. I'm going to leave that little surprise for you too.

Oh and I should add that in addition to the story line there are hilarious and sometimes annoying footnote comments and also cute sketches sprinkled through the story that are the author's personal efforts. The recommendations on the back cover are a hoot too.

While I did get a bit tired of the references to cages, I thoroughly enjoyed this rendition of P&P. This was the third written in a series that takes each Jane Austen tale and adds a paranormal element to it. It is my first read in the series and I definitely plan to go back and read the others. Those who enjoy gentle, humor-filled monster tales and can tolerate it blended with fine classic literature should give this one a try.
4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
HASH(0x8faf4bb8) von 5 Sternen Surprised 7. September 2012
Von Mausuu - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verifizierter Kauf
I bought this expecting it to be utterly ridiculous. I figured I would get some MST3k/rifftrax style amusement out of it. I was pleasantly surprised to find out that it was not at all what I expected.

It was actually quite an enjoyable read, so much so that I had trouble stopping so that I could get some sleep. There were plenty of parts where I was laughing so loudly that I woke my husband up.

Vera Nazarian seamlessly weaves her ideas into the narrative, making them fit with little trouble. Little details like regimental cages and affliction steak make it work.

My only real complaint is the sexist inherent in the way the affliction is treated as a plot device, particularly the reasoning behind why men have it, and women don't. It's a small enough issue though, given that it is based off of a story that was set and written in a time when sexism was a way of life.

Oh. There was one area in which I was not disappointed with a lack of terribleness. The footnotes were utterly ridiculous, but in an entirely amusing way. I found, contrary to another reviewer's opinion, that they were not really in the way all that much. You can tap the number to read a note, then tap the number again to return to where you were in the story, so it's not like you have to search to find your place again.

All in all, I would definitely recommend giving this book a try, provided you heed my warning, and beware of the duck.
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