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The Polish Deportees of World War II: Recollections of Removal to the Soviet Union and Dispersal Throughout the World von [Tadeusz Piotrowski]
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The Polish Deportees of World War II: Recollections of Removal to the Soviet Union and Dispersal Throughout the World 1 , Kindle Edition


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Produktbeschreibungen

Kurzbeschreibung

Among the great tragedies that befell Poland during World War II was the forced deportation of its citizens by the Soviet Union during the first Soviet occupation of that country between 1939 and 1941.
This is the story of that brutal Soviet ethnic cleansing campaign told in the words of some of the survivors. It is an unforgettable human drama of excruciating martyrdom in the Gulag. For example, one witness reports: “A young woman who had given birth on the train threw herself and her newborn under the wheels of an approaching train.” Survivors also tell the story of events after the “amnesty.” “Our suffering is simply indescribable. We have spent weeks now sleeping in lice-infested dirty rags in train stations,” wrote the Milewski family. Details are also given on the non-European countries that extended a helping hand to the exiles in their hour of need.

Synopsis

Among the great tragedies that befell Poland during World War II was the forced deportation of its citizens by the Soviet Union during the first Soviet occupation of that country between 1939 and 1941. This is the story of that brutal Soviet ethnic cleansing campaign told in the words of some of the survivors. It is an unforgettable human drama of excruciating martyrdom in the Gulag. For example, one witness reports: "A young woman who had given birth on the train threw herself and her newborn under the wheels of an approaching train." Survivors also tell the story of events after the "amnesty." "Our suffering is simply indescribable." wrote the Milewski family. Details are also given on the countries that extended a helping hand to the exiles in their hour of need.

Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 2837 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 256 Seiten
  • Verlag: McFarland; Auflage: 1 (14. September 2007)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B002UD5HR6
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Aktiviert
  • Verbesserter Schriftsatz: Nicht aktiviert
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: Schreiben Sie die erste Bewertung

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Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta) (Kann Kundenrezensionen aus dem "Early Reviewer Rewards"-Programm beinhalten)

Amazon.com: 4.8 von 5 Sternen 5 Rezensionen
5.0 von 5 Sternen Very Sad History 20. Juni 2017
Von Ph500 - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verifizierter Kauf
I couldn't put this book down. I found out my great uncle and his family were deportees. It made me sick to know such a thing happened. Well worth knowing this part of Polish history.
5 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Interesting 1. Dezember 2012
Von Jen R. - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verifizierter Kauf
I really enjoyed this book. It is absolutely heartbreaking, but it shed light on a part of WWII history I was not familiar with. I loved reading these new insights (new to me at least) about life for these refugees. The story is overall a sad, but hopeful one of suffering combined with a beautiful resilience.
2 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Easy to read but based on many stories 28. April 2013
Von krysiap - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verifizierter Kauf
The book is easily written and is based on recollections of deportees, I would recommend this for descendants of the Poles who were deported, and any one who would like to understand life during the WWII deportations.
9 von 9 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen More must be said 8. Oktober 2012
Von proz - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
My Grandfather and his family were also "guests" of Stalin and sent to Siberia in 1939. What people forget is that the Poles, Russians, and Germans were enemies well before the Second World War. In fact, the the animosity goes as far back as the late 18th Century.

Another fact that is lost is that the Poles continued to fight for their country well after their initial defeat in 1939. They fielded the 4th largest Army against the Nazis during WWII and helped liberate France and Italy. My grandfather ended up with the Polish Second Corps after Poles were released from Siberia to fill the depleted ranks against Germany. However,

Glad to come across this book.
62 von 63 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Virtually Forgotten Soviet Genocide Against Poles 17. November 2005
Von Jan Peczkis - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Piotrowski, the author, dedicates this book: "To the victims of Soviet crimes against humanity". Everyone has heard of what the Nazis did to the Jews, but who ever heard of the 2-3 million Polish gentiles also murdered by the Germans? Even fewer have so much as an inkling of the millions of victims of Communism. The Soviet genocide directed against Poles, reliant as it was on shootings and especially mass overwork and starvation, does not capture the imagination as much as the assembly-style gassing and cremation performed by the Germans. But it was no less real, and no less effective.

All the while, Britain and America were silent and indifferent to Poland's fate. They were in the throes of a Stalin-appeasing mentality, and increasingly saw Poland as a nuisance that undermined Soviet-western relations. As Piotrowski makes it clear, "Appeasement only emboldens the aggressor". Judging by subsequent events of the Cold War, did it ever!

The deportations were the Soviet Union's attempt to gradually destroy the Polish population of the eastern half of Poland that had been conquered in 1939 (Nazi Germany conquered the western half). Piotrowski estimates that 1.7 million Poles were deported to Siberia and other inhospitable regions of the USSR. About half the deported Poles died a slow death there. Only the unexpected German attack on its erstwhile Soviet ally in July 1941 limited the scope of this genocide by putting a halt to further deportations and eventually prompting the release of the emaciated but still-living captive Poles.

Piotrowski describes the harrowing experiences of the Poles in Soviet captivity through the eyes of several eyewitnesses, including "Eva", my aunt. The Communists proved themselves to be masters in psychological torture as well as physical torture. Thus "Eva" was falsely told that her relatives had been put to death. To mock her Christian beliefs, she was dutifully told that her relatives were now "among the angels in heaven". She was thrown in a dungeon in which there was a decomposing human corpse. Miraculously, she was finally released, along with the rest of the family. The surviving Poles lost everything but their lives. After the Soviet "amnesty" (in which only a part of the still-living captive Poles were released, not all as promised), the Poles gathered in five geographic regions, including Iran and India. Most of the survivors never returned to Poland. Poland had already been given away by the west as a Soviet satellite with a Communist puppet government.
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