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How to Play the 5-String Banjo (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 1. Juni 2002

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Format: Taschenbuch
Thirty-four years ago I started buying and using banjo instruction books. Today I have only one still in my possession, Pete Seeger's "How to Play the 5-String Banjo." In addition to his many other gifts, Seeger has mastered the difficult job of teaching a musical instrument on paper. His approach is to take the student step by step with clear explanations in the text to making music as quickly as possible. Even readers with absolutely no knowledge of musical notation will be able to grasp his explanations and his illustrations. His drawings of the fingerboard are not the most sophisticated graphics in the business, but they don't have to be. The book (which isn't very long) also teaches the student about traditional and home made music as it touches on many styles of banjo playing. Seeger clearly uses banjo instruction as another means to spread his lifelong gospel of the integrity, value and sheer joy of music that comes out of living rooms rather than loudspeakers. Despite its popularity, the three-finger bluegrass banjo style of playing gets only cursory treatment in the text, but that is not a slight. There are plenty of slick and heavily tabbed (for "tablature") music books focusing on the so-called Scruggs-style. Seeger's book acknowledges bluegrass, but gives the many other styles the due they receive nowhere else. I was at first frustrated, but later pleased at his technique of giving the student the words and music for only the first verse of a traditional song, telling me that I can get the complete version elsewhere. He was saving valuable space for more songs and other styles, and forcing us to expand our horizons to the sources he cites in the text.Lesen Sie weiter... ›
Kommentar 10 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
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Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
So spielt der Meister!
Das Buch ist sehr gut, jedoch nur für Leute, die auch sattelfest in Englisch/Amerikanisch sind.
Schade, dass es dieses Buch nicht auf Deutsch gibt.
Aber Pete Seeger ist ja immer auch darauf bedacht gewesen, Dinge so einfach wie möglich zu erklären.
Daher ist das Buch auch beinahe für jedermann nutzbar.
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221 von 224 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
HASH(0x8f9e56d8) von 5 Sternen A review by one who learned to play the banjo from this book 1. September 1998
Von Bruce D. Collins - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
Thirty-four years ago I started buying and using banjo instruction books. Today I have only one still in my possession, Pete Seeger's "How to Play the 5-String Banjo." In addition to his many other gifts, Seeger has mastered the difficult job of teaching a musical instrument on paper. His approach is to take the student step by step with clear explanations in the text to making music as quickly as possible. Even readers with absolutely no knowledge of musical notation will be able to grasp his explanations and his illustrations. His drawings of the fingerboard are not the most sophisticated graphics in the business, but they don't have to be. The book (which isn't very long) also teaches the student about traditional and home made music as it touches on many styles of banjo playing. Seeger clearly uses banjo instruction as another means to spread his lifelong gospel of the integrity, value and sheer joy of music that comes out of living rooms rather than loudspeakers. Despite its popularity, the three-finger bluegrass banjo style of playing gets only cursory treatment in the text, but that is not a slight. There are plenty of slick and heavily tabbed (for "tablature") music books focusing on the so-called Scruggs-style. Seeger's book acknowledges bluegrass, but gives the many other styles the due they receive nowhere else. I was at first frustrated, but later pleased at his technique of giving the student the words and music for only the first verse of a traditional song, telling me that I can get the complete version elsewhere. He was saving valuable space for more songs and other styles, and forcing us to expand our horizons to the sources he cites in the text. Thus, does his banjo instruction book inject the reader into the world of traditional music. My enthusiasm for the book is such that I've gone through 2 copies. I easily learned the frailing style. I have a grasp of Scruggs-style (and I tried Earl Scrugg's own book, too). But, I never got the hang of the drop-thumb. I don't blame Pete or his book for that lapse. Along the way I was introduced to songs, and the musical and social histories from which they sprang. Seeger's book was the best musical investment I ever made after I bought my first 5-string. Its purchase price is a pittance compared to the decades of enjoyment it has allowed me to experience.
Bruce Collins Greensboro, MD
95 von 100 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
HASH(0x8f9e572c) von 5 Sternen Great read. Tough for beginners. 30. Dezember 2003
Von Ein Kunde - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
So, there I was. A thirty-something workaholic looking for a new hobby to unwind a bit, but with very little in the way of musical experience. Nonetheless, inspired by a local Allison Kraus concert, I found a hot deal on a great used banjo on E-bay and I was off and running! What fun! I'm hooked on the 5-string twang!! About 3 months or so at 30-minutes a day (give or take) and I can play well enough to entertain myself - and my wife and the cat can at least stay in the same room!

Not many banjo instructors in New England, so I thought I'd go in for a few good teach-yourself manuals. I bought four. In order of usefulness they were - Revised Banjo Primer by Geoff Hohwald - First Lessons Banjo by Jack Hatfied - How to Play the 5-string Banjo by Pete Seeger - How to Play Banjo by Tim Jumper.
The Banjo Primer was the best of the lot. I was able to make good progress with about 30 minutes practice each day. The instructions were clear and the tunes were fun to play (Cripple Creek, Boil 'em Cabbage Down, Worried Man Blues). It was VERY helpful that the book came with a CD. Some lessons I just couldn't get until I heard them played, then they came easily. Each lesson is played at three speeds, but I've pretty much given up EVER matching the insanely fast top speed.
First Lessons was next best. It also came with a useful CD with multiple speeds and I think I've at least got a shot at the top speed. It also includes tracks with only the backup musicians so you can jam on your own (I haven't reached that point yet). The choice of music wasn't as good - the intro claims that well-known songs are easier to learn, but I found them to be cliche and boring (Tom Dooley, Old Time Religion, Good Night Ladies). It was much more fun to learn a song I didn't know and finding myself actually playing something that sounds like bluegrass after the long struggle!
Both books cover roughly the same techniques and both focus exclusively on Scruggs Style picking (all plucking, almost no chord strumming). It's turning into my favorite style. But my goal is to play well enough to sit in on a local bluegrass jam, so I've also started to learn other styles (e.g. frailing) that will let me strum on chords in the background to build confidence. For that I need other books, but so far I haven't found a good one.
By all accounts, Pete Seeger's book seems to be the classic in the field. It started as a set of hand copied notes and it really is lots of fun to read. I hope that once I improve a bit more I'll be able to get more out of it. My guess is that its the book you'd want if you already had a community of pickers around to lend advice and guidance. As a teach-yourself manual though, I'm finding it tough going.
How to Play Banjo is the worst of the lot. To my untrained eye it seems more like a guitar book than a bluegrass banjo book. The focus is on chords and strumming (which is good for my next step I suppose), but it's just boring. The instruction is minimal and the music uninteresting, at least to me. I tried several times to get into it but found myself quickly going back to the other manuals when I realized I was no longer looking forward to my practice times. I finally threw in the towel on this one when I used it to try to learn "frailing". I like to think I'm a smart guy, but I just didn't get it. And I don't think it was me. Maybe if it came with a CD that I could listen to I could work it out. I'm now in the market for an alternative, but in the meantime I'll keep pickin' with the Scruggs Style.
One last bit of advice. I highly recommend getting at least two books. I found myself much more motivated jumping back and forth between the Primer and First Lessons - when one got too hard or too boring, I'd work on the other for a few days. A great trick to keep from getting stuck. I'm in the market for some "intermediate" books next and I'll probably take the same approach.
Happy Picking!!
54 von 56 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
HASH(0x8f9e5900) von 5 Sternen Everybody's first banjo book 2. April 2001
Von Michael J. Edelman - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
What can you say about a little book that started out as a handful of mimeographed sheets, and has been in print for over 40 years? Like thousands of other player, my banjo playing began with a borrowed Harmony 5 string banjo and the this little book.
And what a marvelous little book it was! In a few pages Pete introduced me to scores of styles, tunings and songs. I didn't even know there was more than one way to play a banjo, but by the time I worked my way through this book I could frail, I could play a bit of clawhammer, and I could even work my way through a slow and tortured version of Earl Scruggs' great "Foggy Mountain Breakdown". All the songs and techniques are presented in a simplfied tablature, and Pete's explainations and the illustrations are goods enough that I managed to develop a pretty good clawhammer stroke even though I'd never actually heard one played before.
It's amazing how much Pete squeezed into this tiny book. Besides instruction in playing, there are bits on the history of the banjo, choosing a banjo, installing a fifth-string capo, lengthening a banjo neck- in short, everything the total novice needs to get started and then some. I eventually progressed to other books- notably Art Rosenbaul's "Old Time Mountain Banjo" and "Art of the Mountain Banjo", and of course Ken Perlman's many fine books on clawhammer style, but I always kept a copy of this little manual around, as much as a reminder of those early days as anything. What more can I say? It's a gem. I love this little book.
13 von 13 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
HASH(0x8f9e5f30) von 5 Sternen For the Compleat Banjoist 6. Juli 2005
Von Peter J. Curry - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
Pete Seeger's "How to Play the 5-string Banjo" is easily one of the most informative and readable books about the 5-string banjo ever written. For years, it was the only such book available, and countless of today's best-known banjo players got their start studying its pages and listening to the accompanying LP (available on CD from Smithsonian/Folkways; a new DVD version is also available from Homespun Tapes).

From an historical standpoint, this book contains the first usage of the terms "pulling-off" and "hammering-on," which Pete coined to describe these now commonplace left-hand playing techniques. Pete is also responsible for reviving the use of tablature, a simplified way of diagraming music that had not been used for centuries.

It is important to note that this book was written before bluegrass became the most popular style of banjo playing. So while "Scruggs style" is ably discussed within its pages (with the help of Mike Seeger), many other playing styles are explained and demonstrated. These "other styles" were the ones used by Bob Gibson, Erik Darling, Peggy Seeger, Hedy West and all the banjo greats of the so-called "Folk Era" (including, of course, Pete himself). So if you're a fan of banjo music from that period, this book is a must.

For me, the key thing about Pete Seeger's banjo playing (and teaching) is his belief that the 5-string banjo is not a narrowly defined "bluegrass" or "folk" or "old-timey" instrument--but rather, that it is a musical instrument whose usefulness is limited only by the player's imagination. Thus in this book we find TABs of mountain tunes like "Darling Corey" and "East Virginia" side by side with "Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring" and Seeger's beautiful accompaniment for the "Burgundian Carol."

The current edition is identical to the classic "Third Edition, Revised" from 1962, with some notes from Pete added to the inside covers. Regarding these notes, one reviewer said: "He indicates that if he had time for a major revision, he would start with G tuning and three-finger picking, where are more in vogue nowadays." The part about Pete wanting to start with G tuning (rather than C tuning) is accurate. But the picking style Pete says he'd now prefer to start with is not three-finger picking; it is a type of two-finger picking (index finger and thumb) he learned from Bascom Lamar Lunsford. And my guess is that he now would like to start with G tuning not because it is "more in vogue these days" but simply because it is easier to learn to play in the key of G using G tuning than it is in the key of C using C tuning. (For one thing, a G chord in G tuning requires no left-hand fretting at all.) Likewise, while the "Lunsford Lick" has the same "bump-dit-ty" rhythm as the "basic strum" and frailing, it is easier for the beginner to master. And Seeger's aim has always been to get people playing (and singing) as quickly as possible.

Is this the best book to start with? Probably not, especially if your interest in the 5-string banjo is restricted strictly to bluegrass. But if you're open to exploring many different banjo-playing styles and applying them to many different kinds of music, there is no better place to begin.
22 von 24 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
HASH(0x8f9e5f54) von 5 Sternen How to Play the 5-String Banjo by Pete Seeger 2. August 2001
Von Yakaphil - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
I bought this book over 35 years ago. I still use it today. Learned Seeger and Frailing (claw-hammer) style from this book. Probably the best book for the beginner, who wants to learn the original bluegrass style.
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