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The Origins of the British: The New Prehistory of Britain: A Genetic Detective Story (English Edition) von [Oppenheimer, Stephen]
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The Origins of the British: The New Prehistory of Britain: A Genetic Detective Story (English Edition) Kindle Edition

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Länge: 400 Seiten Word Wise: Aktiviert Verbesserter Schriftsatz: Aktiviert
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Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

"* 'The thrill of this book lies in the vast reaches of time and space that one is deftly guided through.' Emma Crichton-Miller, Sunday Telegraph * 'I can put my finger on a map and say that is where my people came from... research by Dr Oppenheimer and others has now given us all the right to say that.' The Economist"

Kurzbeschreibung

Stephen Oppenheimer's extraordinary scientific detective story combining genetics, linguistics, archaeology and historical record shatters the myths we have come to live by. It demonstrates that the Anglo-Saxon invasions contributed just a tiny fraction (5%) to the English gene pool.

Two thirds of the English people reveal an unbroken line of genetic descent from south-western Europeans arriving long before the first farmers. The bulk of the remaining third arrived between 7,000 and 3,000 years ago as part of long-term north-west European trade and immigration, especially from Scandinavia - and may have brought with them the earliest forms of English language.

As for the Celts - the Irish, Scots and Welsh - history has traditionally placed their origins in Iron Age Central Europe. Oppenheimer's genetic synthesis shows them to have arrived via the Atlantic coastal route from Ice Age refuges including the Basque country; with the modern languages we call Celtic arriving later.

There is indeed a deep divide between the English and the rest of the British. But as this book reveals the division is many thousands of years older than previously thought.


Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 16127 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 656 Seiten
  • Verlag: Robinson; Auflage: New Ed (1. März 2012)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B007KK4LWQ
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Aktiviert
  • Verbesserter Schriftsatz: Aktiviert
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 3.0 von 5 Sternen 3 Kundenrezensionen
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: #229.439 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop (Siehe Top 100 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop)

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Kundenrezensionen

3.0 von 5 Sternen
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Top-Kundenrezensionen

Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
Um es vorweg zu sagen, das Thema ist interessant und die Herangehensweise erst recht.
Die Aufarbeitung mit vielen Schaubildern überzeugend, aber nun kommt das aber
ich habe keine Aussage über die verwendete Datenbasis gefunden, und dies gehört für mich zumindest in den Anhang eines Buches, das von Statistik lebt. Denn nur aus abstrahierten Prozentzahlen kann der Leser nicht auf die Relevanz des Ergebnisses schliessen. Hier wäre es interessant zu wissen wieviel Datensätze in welcher räumlichen Verteilung ausgewertet wurden!
Er wisst an mehreren Stellen immer auf die Vorsicht hin, die bei der Interpretation seiner gewonnenen Verteilungszahlen zu walten hat. Leider hält er sich dann selbst nicht daran. so macht er sich eine Minderheitenposition in der Linguistik zu eigen, weil sie ihm gut passt.
Wie wäre es gewesen seine Erkenntnise mit der Mehrheitsmeinung abzugleichen?
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Format: Taschenbuch
While we in North America have a distressing tendency to lump most of the inhabitants of the British Isles together, those living there are aware of their diversity. That awareness has been carried rather to extremes by some scholars and politicians. "What is a Celt?" has been a key question, as has been its follow-up "What really happened to the Celts?" Tied in with these queries is the problem of finding an origin for the Celts and just what language they spoke. Stephen Oppenheimer addresses these and related issues in a comprehensive "detective story" incorporating history, analytical genetics and linguistic studies. His conclusions, well depicted in this provocative study, will prove surprising to some, and perhaps distressing to a few.

The British Isles, he begins, have the advantage of being invaders of a "terra nullius" [uninhabited land] some fifteen thousand years ago. As the Last Glacial Maximum retreated before the rise of a revived warm period, humans were able to enter a land they'd been driven from thousands of years previously. While this situation offers nothing to the historian, archaeologists and geneticists have a clear starting point for placing and dating the migration. Not an island then, Britain was a peninsula jutting out from the European land mass. That provided an easy route from the Mediterranean shoreline, around what is now Iberia to the southern and western coasts of Britain. Since "western" here now means Eire, it's clear the first adjustment of opinion must accommodate Ireland and Britain. Clearly, there were later population movements, but where did they originate, how long did they last and what numbers of people were involved? Most significantly, what languages did they speak?
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Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
This is being sold for a high price as a genuine hardcover edition, but is, in fact, just the paperback edition (cheap paper, glued, not sewn in signatures, etc.) with cardboard replacing the paper covers.

My apologies to the author, as my rating in no sense reflects on the actual content of the book.

Buy the paperback for half the price!
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Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x94d04648) von 5 Sternen 40 Rezensionen
55 von 55 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
HASH(0x94b89918) von 5 Sternen Don't listen to the poor reviews 1. Juli 2009
Von Aziliz - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
I read this book after reading another 'DNA' book, "Saxons, Vikings and Celts" by Brian Sykes and Oppenheimer wins hands down.

Sykes seemed to have very little to say and had to pad out his DNA information with some rather poorly presented information from history and archaeology and a lot of the story of his project of collecting DNA in the field. Stephen Oppenheimer, on the other hand, was so comprehensive in his coverage of the study of the origins and migrations of peoples as traced through DNA that he left Sykes eating his dust back at the starting line.

The book has everything from a really good explanation of the different types of DNA and how they are tested through to comprehensive information on all the DNA types that migrated into the British Isles, where they came from, what their migration path was on the way and when they entered the British Isles with a level of detail that left me stunned they could actually tell so much from DNA. There are many very clear maps and charts to help with visualisation of the information. The book also weaves in the archaeological, linguistic and historical evidence but as an adjunct to the DNA evidence and not a replacement like in Sykes book and a very accurate and detailed adjunct too.

This is a big book but I sat enthralled and read it cover to cover very quickly, something that I could never do if it had been too hard, dry and academic or if it had been poorly written. It is academic, it is detailed, it does repeat itself at times (which I found useful), it brings together all the available research at the time of writing discussing the work of a wide range of researchers in the field, it is incredibly comprehensive and it does not deserve to have the three damning reviews given the top votes by you the viewers.
99 von 107 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
HASH(0x93f2075c) von 5 Sternen fascinating topic but terribly written 17. Dezember 2006
Von m-starr - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
I'm fascinated by studies of the human diaspora based on DNA evidence, especially when they interweave the genetics with history, linguistics and archaeology. Being partly of English ancestory myself, this book looked right up my alley, and indeed I read it cover to cover. It advances two interesting arguments: (a) that the Celtic peoples of the British Isles come not from a Central European homeland, but rather moved up the Atlantic coast from an Ice Age refuge in Basque country, and (b) that the Germanic roots of the English population are much older than the Anglo-Saxon invasion and instead reflect earlier waves of inflows from Scandinavia and Frisia. But the book is DREADFULLY written. It is terribly organized, so that issues come up again and again as though the author forgot he mentioned it before. There are all kinds of digressions that seem unrelated to the main thesis, but that for some reason the author wanted to mention. Small topics receive pages and pages of coverage, while some main ones go fast. In the end, it's hard to judge whether the book's novel arguments hold water, because there is too much speculation woven in with the facts. My interest sustained me, but if I found this topic anything less than fascinating, there's no way I would have plodded through this book.
54 von 57 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
HASH(0x93df0714) von 5 Sternen Interesting But Very Technical 11. Dezember 2006
Von John D. Cofield - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
I'm very interested in the use of DNA analysis in genealogy and uncovering the "deep ancestry" of humanity, so I was most intrigued when I saw this book had been published and ordered it quickly. It has some useful information, but its written in a very dry, technical style which does little or nothing to interest or inspire a general readership.

Being of British ancestry myself, and having had my DNA analyzed already, I was hopeful that this book could help me determine more about my distant ancestry. There are numerous maps and charts which do so to an extent, but they don't go far enough to really illuminate things. This is not entirely the book's fault: DNA research is such a new field that a standard method of referencing the material has not completely evolved, causing difficulties if you cross-check several different sources.

Oppenheimer has been able to demonstrate that much of the mythology surrounding early settlement of Britain is just that: myth and legend. The true story of British ancestral origins is much more complex and sometimes confusing than the old story line of Celts-Romans-Angles-Vikings would have us believe. This work will be a valuable reference, especially after writers with a more general audience in mind take over the job of introducing the subject so that more people can get a basic grounding. Then Oppenheimer's work can be more fully appreciated by more people.
71 von 79 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
HASH(0x9bee5d50) von 5 Sternen Fascinating topic, but not well written. 12. November 2006
Von John Clavin - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
I wanted to like this book, I really did, but despite being about a topic that should have kept me enthralled for hours (it's a fairly hefty book at 420 pages + 100 or so pages of appendices), I found the authors overly academic style of writing and constant references to other learned works (many of them his own) very severly got in the way of telling the detective story that he'd spent so much time unravelling.

I felt like I was back in college wading through a course related text book rather than reading for pleasure.

The premise of the book is to look at certain genetic markers in the current population of the British Isles and use that information to track back to other population groupings in Mainland Europe and adjacent areas to identify the various locations that human migrations to the British Isles during the last fifteen thousand years originated.

Who was there First?

Who were the Celts and where did they come from?

Did Celtic populations dominate southern Britain before the Romans or was it some other population group?

Which of the historical tribes has the most profound [genetic] influence on the current pupulation of Europes Northwestern Isles - Angles? Saxons? Jutes? Frisians? Picts? Vikings? Celts? Normans?

These and other questions are all dealt with through the books rather ponderous examination of the genetic clues to "The Origins of the British".

The attentions of a decent editor and the use of a friendlier writing style would have made this a much more entertaining read rather than being a trial that only just kept me occupied on a trans oceanic flight.

Rating this one is a bit tricky - I'd give it a four for interest level of the topic, and unfortunately just one for the readibility.
24 von 24 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
HASH(0x942a6390) von 5 Sternen Celtic confusions 10. April 2008
Von Stephen A. Haines - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
While we in North America have a distressing tendency to lump most of the inhabitants of the British Isles together, those living there are aware of their diversity. That awareness has been carried rather to extremes by some scholars and politicians. "What is a Celt?" has been a key question, as has been its follow-up "What really happened to the Celts?" Tied in with these queries is the problem of finding an origin for the Celts and just what language they spoke. Stephen Oppenheimer addresses these and related issues in a comprehensive "detective story" incorporating history, analytical genetics and linguistic studies. His conclusions, well depicted in this provocative study, will prove surprising to some, and perhaps distressing to a few.

The British Isles, he begins, have the advantage of being invaders of a "terra nullius" [uninhabited land] some fifteen thousand years ago. As the Last Glacial Maximum retreated before the rise of a revived warm period, humans were able to enter a land they'd been driven from thousands of years previously. While this situation offers nothing to the historian, archaeologists and geneticists have a clear starting point for placing and dating the migration. Not an island then, Britain was a peninsula jutting out from the European land mass. That provided an easy route from the Mediterranean shoreline, around what is now Iberia to the southern and western coasts of Britain. Since "western" here now means Eire, it's clear the first adjustment of opinion must accommodate Ireland and Britain. Clearly, there were later population movements, but where did they originate, how long did they last and what numbers of people were involved? Most significantly, what languages did they speak?

From his introductory survey, Oppenheimer proceeds to tease out the answers to these questions. The origins are traced back in time using genetic markers. Mitochondrial DNA, carried down the generations only through female inheritance factors provides one scenario. The Y chromosome, the genetic marker for men is analysed separately, then compared. In most, although not all cases, the matches are mutually supportive. Archaeological finds are used as further indicators which have the advantage of solid dating techniques to support them, unlike the DNA tests which rest on a calculation based on presumed mutation rates. The language question remains contentious. Oppenheimer links it with the spread of farming entering Europe from Anatolia introducing early forms of Celtic into Western Europe. The author's genetic analysis also overturns the idea that farmers "displaced" earlier hunter-gatherer societies in Europe and Britain. Instead, farming was adapted by the resident population and farmers' larger families added some population pressure, but hardly "displacement". The same holds true for the Roman occupation, which was more interested in social stability and tax collecting than genocide.

The post-Roman era has also led to the establishment of displacement myths and their more recent overturning. History, partly thanks to reliance on "Saint" Gildas, has stoked the fires of national sentiments by depicting the Angles and Saxons as a barbarian horde bent on ethnic cleansing of the indigenous "Celtic" peoples. Oppenheimer rejects this tradition, arguing instead that a "warrior elite" may have entered Britain, but this was a small population and a continuation of British-Continental ties in any case. Just who those "barbarians" were is problematic in any case, since the author sees ongoing contact with the Frisian and near shore of Europe rather than a conquering horde emerging from northern Germany. It is now generally accepted that the Norman "Conquest" was only slightly more intrusive than the Roman one, with an elite doing the ruling and the long-lasting indigenous population doing everything else like farming, herding and trading.

A major issue here is language. Linguists, Oppenheimer argues have been keen to avoid dating of language branching, mostly because early attempts came to grief. He goes so far as to separate "Celtic" populations from "celtic" languages. Part of the reason for this is the lack of a written base of celtic to use as a foundation. The Classical Period commentators in Greece and Rome wrote of "Celts" in a vague sort of way, and even a man on the ground, Julius Caesar was unable to make definitive comments about either the people or their languages. More precise cultural details were omitted entirely. Oppenheimer's path through the language issues is inevitably a tortured one, but he makes a serious effort at simplification. Whatever his success is due to a paucity of real data. For him, the genes speak louder than words. [stephen a. haines - Ottawa, Canada]
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