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Kommentar: 22,9 x 15,2 x 1,1 cm, Taschenbuch University of Chicago Press, 11.04.2014. 180 Seiten Sofortversand! Gutes Exemplar, geringe Gebrauchsspuren, Cover/SU berieben/bestoßen, innen alles in Ordnung; good - fine Immediate delivery in bubble wrap envelope! Good copy, light signs of previous use, cover/dust jacket has some rubbing/wear (along the edges), interior in good condition 160905av23 ISBN: 9780226132518
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The Only Woman in the Room: A Memoir Of Japan, Human Rights, And The Arts (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 11. April 2014

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Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

"Gordon's personal story will enlighten all who question the importance of women's presence in the corridors of power."--Gloria Steinem

." . . A woman with the courage to match her convictions."--Yoko Ono

"A prime example of truth being stranger and at the same time more coherent than fiction. . . . Spellbinding."--Yehudi Menuhin

"Brimming with wisdom, sophistication and energy."--Hanae Mori

"The story of a remarkable life. . . . Fascinating."--YoYo Ma

"Gordon provides an evocative portrait, carefully and tenderly recording the evanescent world of her parents in privileged, prewar, expatriate Tokyo society on the eve of its demise as well as giving us a glimpse of the newly emerging and hopeful order of democratic, postwar Japan."--Linda Isako Angst "The Journal of Asian Studies "

"A warm, colorful, haunting, and thoroughly entertaining memoir of an enviably rich and adventure-filled life. What a story!"--Dick Cavett

"Gordon's death has unearthed her legacy promoting gender equality for all women. Let's hope it stays in the light."--Cristine Russell "The Atlantic "

"Five Stars. [Sirota-Gordon's] remarkable memoir details . . . how as a young woman she rose to meet the challenge of reshaping a country from scratch. . . . The real heart of the book is the week of Sirota Gordon's work on the Constitution. . . . This chapter forms the crux of the memoir and her life, and I reread it multiple times, fascinated by the insider's view of writing the Constitution and at the accomplishment and determination of a 22-year-old. Today, Sirota Gordon's historic effort on the Constitution is particularly poignant, as lawmakers continue to debate Article 9 and the peace clause. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe enrages pacifists with his mandate to 'seek a more active role' in collective self-defense. Other lawmakers, buoyed by Article 9's candidacy for the Nobel Peace Prize, insist on supporting Japan as a peaceful nation. Despite its timely importance, however, the memoir does not carry a political agenda. The reverberations of that one week in February 1946 when Sirota Gordon worked on the Constitution echo throughout the work, and make you wonder: If a 22-year-old young woman, cultured and pampered so much that she did not know how to make her own bed at 15 years old, can overcome political pressure and 20-hour work days in that frenzied week to create a constitution that ensured rights for women and education, then perhaps each of us, too, has the potential to push for peace."--Kris Kosaka"Japan Times" (06/14/2014)

"Honest, plain and straightforward--written not by a professional author but an extremely well-bred, cultured woman who had forged a career for herself in a time when women--even in America--were expected to marry, have babies and sink themselves in domestic bliss. Or just sink. . . . Though her tone is consistently soft and modest, her voice is clearly her own--and when it's time to stand up for the Japanese and their rights, she apparently didn't give an inch. What an ally the Japanese had in Beate. . . . Beate wasn't a saint nor interested in being one. Without meaning to, she came pretty close. Her prose is never condescending, nor does it brim with self-congratulations as in the case of many memoirs. . . . What culminates from her memoirs is her selflessness. Helping others, being fair, and maintaining a striking modesty in spite of her many accomplishments were the defining factors of Beate's life."--Kaori Shoji "Japan Subculture Research Center "

Five Stars. [Sirota-Gordon s] remarkable memoir details . . . how as a young woman she rose to meet the challenge of reshaping a country from scratch. . . . The real heart of the book is the week of Sirota Gordon s work on the Constitution. . . . This chapter forms the crux of the memoir and her life, and I reread it multiple times, fascinated by the insider s view of writing the Constitution and at the accomplishment and determination of a 22-year-old. Today, Sirota Gordon s historic effort on the Constitution is particularly poignant, as lawmakers continue to debate Article 9 and the peace clause. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe enrages pacifists with his mandate to seek a more active role in collective self-defense. Other lawmakers, buoyed by Article 9 s candidacy for the Nobel Peace Prize, insist on supporting Japan as a peaceful nation. Despite its timely importance, however, the memoir does not carry a political agenda. The reverberations of that one week in February 1946 when Sirota Gordon worked on the Constitution echo throughout the work, and make you wonder: If a 22-year-old young woman, cultured and pampered so much that she did not know how to make her own bed at 15 years old, can overcome political pressure and 20-hour work days in that frenzied week to create a constitution that ensured rights for women and education, then perhaps each of us, too, has the potential to push for peace. --Kris Kosaka"Japan Times" (06/14/2014)"

Honest, plain and straightforward written not by a professional author but an extremely well-bred, cultured woman who had forged a career for herself in a time when women even in America were expected to marry, have babies and sink themselves in domestic bliss. Or just sink. . . . Though her tone is consistently soft and modest, her voice is clearly her own and when it s time to stand up for the Japanese and their rights, she apparently didn t give an inch. What an ally the Japanese had in Beate. . . . Beate wasn t a saint nor interested in being one. Without meaning to, she came pretty close. Her prose is never condescending, nor does it brim with self-congratulations as in the case of many memoirs. . . . What culminates from her memoirs is her selflessness. Helping others, being fair, and maintaining a striking modesty in spite of her many accomplishments were the defining factors of Beate s life. --Kaori Shoji "Japan Subculture Research Center ""

Gordon s personal story will enlighten all who question the importance of women s presence in the corridors of power. --Gloria Steinem"

Gordon s death has unearthed her legacy promoting gender equality for all women. Let s hope it stays in the light. --Cristine Russell "The Atlantic ""

A warm, colorful, haunting, and thoroughly entertaining memoir of an enviably rich and adventure-filled life. What a story! --Dick Cavett"

. . . A woman with the courage to match her convictions. --Yoko Ono"

A prime example of truth being stranger and at the same time more coherent than fiction. . . . Spellbinding. --Yehudi Menuhin"

Brimming with wisdom, sophistication and energy. --Hanae Mori"

The story of a remarkable life. . . . Fascinating. --YoYo Ma"

Gordon provides an evocative portrait, carefully and tenderly recording the evanescent world of her parents in privileged, prewar, expatriate Tokyo society on the eve of its demise as well as giving us a glimpse of the newly emerging and hopeful order of democratic, postwar Japan. --Linda Isako Angst "The Journal of Asian Studies ""

Synopsis

This is the memoir of a life that encompasses pre-war Japan, drafting the women's rights section of Japan's constitution, and decades spent between Japan and the world. -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine vergriffene oder nicht verfügbare Ausgabe dieses Titels.

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Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Ms. Gordon, born in Vienna and educated in Japan and the United States, found herself by an accident of history in Japan at age 22 with the American Occupation Forces immediately after World War II. General MacArthur directed her and others to draft a new constitution for Japan. Drawing on European constitutions that she found in the remaining libraries in war-torn Tokyo, she wrote for Japanese women an advanced equal rights clause that Japanese women have treasured ever since. The story of how the Japanese constitution was written is extremely interesting and well-written. Readers interested in Vienna and in European social activity of the early 20th Century will also find interesting descriptions of same. Mrs. Gordon's father was a famous Russian pianist who associated with many other famous pianists of his era, such as Artur Rubinstein.
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Format: Taschenbuch
This is the autobiography of Beate Sirota Gordon, the daughter of the famous pianist Leo Sirota. Having been brought up mainly in Austria and Japan, Beate was studying in America during the war and thanks to her excellent language skills was hired to monitor foreign radio broadcasts. At the end of the war she returned to Japan in search for her parents and worked for the US army where she also drafted part of the Japanese constitution.

While this is not literary outstanding material, it is nice reading if you are interested in Leo Sirota or in Japan, especially the early 20th century.
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Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.5 von 5 Sternen 27 Rezensionen
5.0 von 5 Sternen Fascinating Family History 17. Januar 2016
Von David M - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verifizierter Kauf
What an amazing life Beate Sirota Gordon lived. This book caught my attention because it dealt with her part in helping write a new constitution for post-war Japan. It also gives a good account of conditions in Japan before, during, and just after the war. Over half the book deals with Beate's life in various countries with a large amount of her growing years spent in Japan. This helps understand where her passion came from in fighting to include articles in the new constitution about protections for women and children. Her deep understanding of Japanese culture was key to why she knew these would be essential for the future of Japan. Fascinating family history and a great read for anyone and especially those interested in WWII history.
4.0 von 5 Sternen Am Always Learning 24. August 2014
Von John Manjiro - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verifizierter Kauf
Didn't know about her and her background until I read this book. We came so close to meeting each other yet we never did. Too bad, I wished I had met her. Enjoyed reading this book very much. Although, I enjoyed reading her activities after her return from Japan, wished she wrote more of Japan during those turbulent years. With both of us being raised by a musician father and my father winning medal in Vienna as the first Japanese in music competition around the same period, am sure we would have had lots to talk about. It seems like both of our parents knew Kosaku Yamada very well. Life is indeed very interesting.
12 von 12 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Now it can be told! 12. Oktober 2002
Von Mindme - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
A concise, elegant autobiography by Beate Sirota Gordon, an Austrian who grew up in pre-war Japan as a child and later returned to what she very much considered her home to find her parents (music teachers who refused to abandon their Japanese students as pre war tensions mounted and were held prisoner). It chronicles not only her battle with the entrenched Japanese male authority but battles with the entrenched American male authority, who weren't necessarily any less sexist than the Japanese. She took a job with the American army as a translator and ended up helping draft Japan's post war constitution. And she did all this at the age of 22!
Gordon escaped the war by going to an all girls school in California. There she encountered the feminist movement and learned a lot about women's rights issues. Upon returning to Japan, she was asked by the American government to help with the constitution. The Americans wanted the constitution written and adopted quickly, fearing the Soviets last minute entry into the war would give them influence. She went to town, drafting about a dozen articles for the Japanese constitution guaranteeing women rights in the work place, politics, health care, child custody, etc. Many were stripped out but two key articles she drafted remained. What's more amazing is Gordon takes so little credit for her accomplishments and instead agonizes more about what was left on the cutting room floor.
For several decades after, the creation of the Japanese constitution was not well publicized. The Americans feared the haste with which it was written and the fact that the job was basically given to a group of found amateurs would cause the Japanese people to reject it. It's only now that her story has been able to come out.
All in all a fascinating account and hard to put down. If there's a downside it's that Gordon doesn't pump up her autobiography with more fascinating and telling anecdotes.
2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Fascinating Book on Many Levels 18. Februar 2010
Von Builder Lady - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
Beate Sirota Gordon (BSG), the author of this easy to read autobiography, had a fascinating life. Not only do you learn about her interesting talented family, but you experience WWII and the Japanese aspect of it from an unusual perspective. Of Austrian parents who moved to Japan prior to the World War, BSG was in college in the US when the war broke out. She was separated from her parents at this young age and had no idea what had happened to them for years. Because of her ingenuity and talents, especially with languages, she became part of MacArthur's team, and eventually became the person responsible for writing the women's section of the new Japanese Constitution. BSG's ideas regarding women's rights even surpassed those of the US Constitution in those times and to some extent even today. A very worthwhile book to read for any one interested in history, human endeavors and women's issues, written by The Only Woman in the Room.
5.0 von 5 Sternen The Essential Herstory of a Woman who Made History 28. Juli 2015
Von Sheila Ryan Hara - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verifizierter Kauf
It was with great pleasure that I finished this autobiography, a book that had been on my must-read list for some time. As an American women living in Japan for twenty years, her life story resonated with me. Her courage in ensuring that women and girls in Japan would have a brighter future amazes me! She's a hero!
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