Facebook Twitter Pinterest <Einbetten>
  • Alle Preisangaben inkl. USt
Nur noch 1 auf Lager
Verkauf und Versand durch London Lane Deutschland. Für weitere Informationen, Impressum, AGB und Widerrufsrecht klicken Sie bitte auf den Verkäufernamen.
EUR 44,56 + EUR 3,00 für Lieferungen nach Deutschland

Lieferort:
Um Adressen zu sehen, bitte
Oder
Bitte tragen Sie eine deutsche PLZ ein.
Oder
+ EUR 0,00 Versandkosten
Gebraucht: Sehr gut | Details
Verkauft von Second City Books USA
Zustand: Gebraucht: Sehr gut
Kommentar: Ships from the USA.Please allow 2 to 3 weeks for delivery. A copy that has been read, but remains in excellent condition. Pages are intact and are not marred by notes or highlighting. The spine remains undamaged. Biggest little used bookstore in the world. Second City Books - the first place to look for second hand books.
Möchten Sie verkaufen?
Zur Rückseite klappen Zur Vorderseite klappen
Hörprobe Wird gespielt... Angehalten   Sie hören eine Hörprobe des Audible Hörbuch-Downloads.
Mehr erfahren
Dieses Bild anzeigen

Nonzero: The Logic of Human Destiny (Englisch) Gebundene Ausgabe – 4. Januar 2000

3.8 von 5 Sternen 30 Kundenrezensionen

Alle 8 Formate und Ausgaben anzeigen Andere Formate und Ausgaben ausblenden
Preis
Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Kindle Edition
Gebundene Ausgabe
EUR 44,56
EUR 44,56 EUR 7,02
2 neu ab EUR 44,56 15 gebraucht ab EUR 7,02
click to open popover

Es wird kein Kindle Gerät benötigt. Laden Sie eine der kostenlosen Kindle Apps herunter und beginnen Sie, Kindle-Bücher auf Ihrem Smartphone, Tablet und Computer zu lesen.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

Geben Sie Ihre Mobiltelefonnummer ein, um die kostenfreie App zu beziehen.

Jeder kann Kindle Bücher lesen — selbst ohne ein Kindle-Gerät — mit der KOSTENFREIEN Kindle App für Smartphones, Tablets und Computer.


Produktinformation

Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

Nonzero, from New Republic writer Robert Wright, is a difficult and important book--well worth reading--addressing the controversial question of purpose in evolution. Using language suggesting that natural selection is a designer's tool, Wright inevitably draws the conclusion that evolution is goal-oriented (or at least moves toward inevitable ends independently of environmental or contingent variables).

The underlying reason that non-zero-sum games wind up being played well is the same in biological evolution as in cultural evolution. Whether you are a bunch of genes or a bunch of memes, if you're all in the same boat you'll tend to perish unless you are conducive to productive coordination.... Genetic evolution thus tends to create smoothly integrated organisms, and cultural evolution tends to create smoothly integrated groups of organisms.

Admittedly, it's as hard to think clearly about natural selection as it is to think about God, but that makes it just as important to acknowledge our biases and try to exclude them from our conclusions. It is this that makes Nonzero potentially unsatisfying to the scientifically literate. Time after time we've seen thinkers try to find in biological evolution a "drive toward complexity" that might explain all sorts of other phenomena from economics to spirituality. Some authors, like Teilhard de Chardin, have much to offer the careful reader who takes pains to read metaphorically. Others--legions of cranks--provide nothing but opaque diatribes culminating in often-bizarre assertions proven to nobody but the author. Wright is much closer to de Chardin along this axis; his anthropological scholarship is particularly noteworthy, and his grasp of world history is excellent. Unfortunately, he has the advocate's willingness to blind himself to disagreeable facts and to muddle over concepts whose clarity would be poisonous to his positions: try to pin him down on what he means by complexity, for example. Still, his thesis that human cultures are historically striving for cooperative, nonzero-sum situations is heartening and compelling; even though it's not supported by biology, it's not knocked down, either. If the reader can work around the undefined assumptions, Wright's charm and obvious interest in planetary survival make Nonzero a worthy read. If the first chapter's title--"The Ladder of Cultural Evolution"--makes you cringe, the last one--"You Call This a God?"--will make you smile. --Rob Lightner

Pressestimmen

Advance Praise for Nonzero

"I recommend Nonzero to any and all readers as a marvelous summary and interpretation of what is now known and surmised about biological and human history on our planet. For an author so well informed scientifically, perhaps the book's most unusual feature is the fact that Wright does not flinch from closing with a chatty, informal yet incisive argument about cosmic meaning and purpose behind the story he unfolds. . . . I greatly admire the book. [Wright] knows so much and has thought so clearly; and allows his imagination to range so freely!"
-- William H. McNeill, professor emeritus of history, University of Chicago, and author of The Rise of the West

"This is the book to read to start off the millennium. Leaping from mountaintop to mountaintop, this integrative and inspiring volume is brimming with hope for a positive human future. Religions are made of such stuff."
-- Martin Seligman, professor of psychology, University of Pennsylvania, and author of Learned Optimism

"Wright's chapters on the evolution of biological complexity and intelligence -- in addition to being beautifully written and scientifically sound -- are a welcome corrective to current trendy views that understate natural selection's creative power. There is, indeed, as Darwin said, a grandeur in this view of life."  
-- James Gould, professor of biology, Princeton University, and author of Biological Science


Praise for The Moral Animal

"A fiercely intelligent, beautifully written, and engrossingly original book. Wright writes with a consistent, irreverent wit that does not hide a heartfelt seriousness of purpose."
-- New York Times Book Review

"This clever and stimulating book is destined to become a classic. . . . Like Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species and Richard Dawkins's The Selfish Gene, it could well change the way people think and feel about their lives -- perhaps even how they behave. . . . An intellectual entertainment argued with wit and style."
-- The Economist

Alle Produktbeschreibungen

Kundenrezensionen

Top-Kundenrezensionen

am 2. Februar 2005
Format: Taschenbuch
0Kommentar| 6 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 1. Juni 2000
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
0Kommentar| 11 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden

Möchten Sie weitere Rezensionen zu diesem Artikel anzeigen?

Die neuesten Kundenrezensionen

Möchten Sie weitere Produkte entdecken? Weitere Informationen finden Sie auf dieser Seite: Skateboarding

Wo ist meine Bestellung?

Versand & Rücknahme

Brauchen Sie Hilfe?