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Nobody's Home: Speech, Self, and Place in American Fiction from Hawthorne to DeLillo: Speech, Self and Place in American Fiction from Hawthorne to DeLillo von [Weinstein, Arnold]
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Nobody's Home: Speech, Self, and Place in American Fiction from Hawthorne to DeLillo: Speech, Self and Place in American Fiction from Hawthorne to DeLillo Kindle Edition

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Länge: 366 Seiten Word Wise: Aktiviert Sprache: Englisch

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Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

"New life is breathed into novels and stories which in most cases have been elaborately examined by a succession of earlier critics....Weinstein not only has a masterful command of the texts he deals with, but also of the criticism which has accumulated about them....Nobody's Home is a stimulating, ambitious book which fulfills virtually all one's expectations about how a comparatist should go about assessing a century and a half of American fiction."--Novel"I deeply admire the care and craft inherent in Weinstein's close-grained analyses'; the author's almost unfashionable optimism is refreshing and, in most cases, tenable and cogent."--Z. Bart Thornton, The Kincaid School"Weinstein reveals something I don't see much in scholarly criticism anymore--his own willingness to be impressed by what he reads. He then studies that impression with all the tools provided by contemporary theory, but the text at hand remains paramount. His readings have that esoteric freedom from dogma that is unfortunately rare these days. I'd recommend him to anyone--graduate or undergraduate."--Nelson Hathcock, Saint Xavier University"A refreshingly clear, insightful, and useful reevaluation of literary works often taught."--Choice"This book is, in one word, splendid. From Hawthorne's Wakefield' to Don DeLillo's novels this book illuminates everything it touches. Weinstein is simply superb on Hawthorne, Melville, Mark Twain, Anderson, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, and Hemingway."--James Cox, Dartmouth College

Kurzbeschreibung

Nobody's Home is a bold view of the American novel from its beginnings to the contemporary scene. Focusing on some of the deepest instincts of American life and culture--individual liberty, freedom of speech, constructing a life--Arnold Weinstein brilliantly sketches the remarkable career of the American self in some of the major works of the past one hundred fifty years. Weinstein contends that American writers are haunted by the twin specters of the self as a mirage, as Nobody, and by the brutal forces of culture and ideology that deny selfhood to people on the basis of money, sex, and color of skin. His central thesis is that language makes possible freedoms and accomplishments that are achievable in no other realm, and that American fiction is a fascinating record of the human fight against coercion, of the kinds of maneuvering room that we may find in life and in art. This study is unique in several respects: it offers some of the keenest readings of major American texts that have ever been written, including some of the most significant works of the past decades, and it fashions a rich and supple view of the American novel as a writerly form of freedom, in sharp contrast to today's critical emphasis on blindness and co-option.

Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 4119 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 368 Seiten
  • Verlag: Oxford University Press; Auflage: 1 (11. März 1993)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B003AIKUFY
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Aktiviert
  • Verbesserter Schriftsatz: Nicht aktiviert
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 5.0 von 5 Sternen 3 Kundenrezensionen
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: #1.246.785 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop (Siehe Top 100 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop)

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Von Ein Kunde am 6. März 1998
Format: Taschenbuch
America's intellectual father is the Modern Enlightenement. From Descarte's turn inward to Kant's radical autonomy, the Enlightenement gave birth to our understanding of freedom. Here, the Western intellectual tradtion separated the self from Nature and God, from any determining context. Essentially, it was the isolated self which gave meaning to, instead of finding meaning in the world. There are some that claim, however, that a self requires and is a causal function of Larger contexts like Culture, Family, Tradition and Religion (to name a few). Thus, it is dangerous and misleading to separate a self from the very material it requires to live. On this reading, the expressions of self are necesserily embedded in a context which presupposes a social world and shared set of meanings - a set of meanings that cannot be created by an isolated, radically free ego. To the contrary, an ego is a function of this world and requires it as a context for expression. Without these objective situations which enframe self, freedom and speech, the self is emptied of necessary content and confronts [our modern illness of] loneliness and despair. At this juncture, one could, vis a vis existentialism, search out the subjective depths of human angst, or one could assume a number of ironic postures in hopes of illustrating the human struggle with, and possibilities for freedom and meaning in a meaninglessness age. NOBODY'S HOME, somehow, shows a unique strain of literature that does both. Read this book if you want to understand how to use your failed Enlightenment inheritence.
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Format: Taschenbuch
Arnold Weinstein is one of our most gifted literary comparativists working in the academy today, and Nobody's Home is Weinstein at his absolute best. Here he weaves together a wide range of American literature (Hawthorne, Melville, Fitzgerald, Morrison, Delillo) by demonstrating that it is the uniquely American theme of self-determinism and self-making (and its sobering corollary of determinism and disillusionment), that inform all of these works. His ability to link these seemingly disparate texts in such convincing fashion is quite extraordinary (the web never falters), and allows Weinstein an entry way into readings that make these texts utterly relevant to our lives today, and that reawaken texts that have been relegated to dusty bookshelves, or that were thought to have been plumbed. Weinstein is not just for those intersted in American literary criticism. He uses the rich record of literature to explore an American theme that is as metaphysical, psychological, and identity-probing as it is literary.
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
Missbrauch melden
Format: Taschenbuch
Arnold Weinstein is one of our most gifted literary comparativists working in the academy today, and Nobody's Home is Weinstein at his absolute best. Here he weaves together a wide range of American literature (Hawthorne, Melville, Fitzgerald, Morrison, Delillo) by demonstrating that it is the uniquely American theme of self-determinism and self-making (and its sobering corollary of determinism and disillusionment), that inform all of these works. His ability to link these seemingly disparate texts in such convincing fashion is quite extraordinary (the web never falters), and allows Weinstein an entry way into readings that make these texts utterly relevant to our lives today, and that reawaken texts that have been relegated to dusty bookshelves, or that were thought to have been plumbed. Weinstein is not just for those intersted in American literary criticism. He uses the rich record of literature to explore human themes that are as metaphysical, psychological, and identity-probing as they are literary.
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
Missbrauch melden
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