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Ninety Percent of Everything: Inside Shipping, the Invisible Industry That Puts Clothes on Your Back, Gas in Your Car, and Food on Your Plate (Englisch) Gebundene Ausgabe – 13. August 2013

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Produktinformation

Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

"Rose George beautifully captures the surprising nuances of this little-known world: beauty and privation, pathos and greed, tragedy and hilarity. Her strong, spare, gleaming prose steams along, powered by curiosity, compassion, outrage. As a writer, a reporter, and a human being, George is--stand by for nautical term--First Rate."
--Mary Roach, author of "Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal"
"For a modern seafaring adventure, there couldn't be a better guide than Rose George. Her intelligence, curiosity, and compassion shine through on every page to reveal a fascinating world that no one knows about, though it is fundamental to our economy and way of life."
--Chris Anderson, curator, TED Conference
"The two greatest stories are supposed to be 'A man goes on a journey' and 'A stranger comes to town.' In this enthralling, literally wide-ranging book, Rose George tells both: she goes on a voyage that few other journalists have accomplished, and she unveils the unknown seafarers who bring us all the world's goods. Her sympathetic, deeply reported, and unexpectedly poignant account reveals the private, prickly, brave tribe on which much of our daily lives, and most of the world's interlinked economies, depend."
--Maryn McKenna, author of "Superbug: The Fatal Menace of MRSA
""To the classic incredible journeys--"Moby Dick," "Two Years Before the Mast"--Rose George adds another, her voyage round the world aboard a container ship, revealing what happens before the big bang of merchandise explodes from the high seas into civilization via cargo containers holding thousands of sneakers, millions of plastic bags, and trillions of other products."
--Curtis C. Ebbesmeyer, coauthor of "Flotsametrics and the Floating World
""The best books make you think about our world in a new way, and "Ninety Percent of Everything" is definitely one of those books. In this smart, lucid, and often beautiful investigation of the little-known world of f

"A fascinating account of the international ocean shipping industry and the arena it operates in, the largely ungoverned open seas."
--"The Seattle Times
""Rose George beautifully captures the surprising nuances of this little-known world: beauty and privation, pathos and greed, tragedy and hilarity. Her strong, spare, gleaming prose steams along, powered by curiosity, compassion, outrage. As a writer, a reporter, and a human being, George is--stand by for nautical term--First Rate."
--Mary Roach, author of "Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal"
"For a modern seafaring adventure, there couldn't be a better guide than Rose George. Her intelligence, curiosity, and compassion shine through on every page to reveal a fascinating world that no one knows about, though it is fundamental to our economy and way of life."
--Chris Anderson, curator, TED Conference
"The two greatest stories are supposed to be 'A man goes on a journey' and 'A stranger comes to town.' In this enthralling, literally wide-ranging book, Rose George tells both: she goes on a voyage that few other journalists have accomplished, and she unveils the unknown seafarers who bring us all the world's goods. Her sympathetic, deeply reported, and unexpectedly poignant account reveals the private, prickly, brave tribe on which much of our daily lives, and most of the world's interlinked economies, depend."
--Maryn McKenna, author of "Superbug: The Fatal Menace of MRSA
""To the classic incredible journeys--"Moby Dick," "Two Years Before the Mast"--Rose George adds another, her voyage round the world aboard a container ship, revealing what happens before the big bang of merchandise explodes from the high seas into civilization via cargo containers holding thousands of sneakers, millions of plastic bags, and trillions of other products."
--Curtis C. Ebbesmeyer, coauthor of "Flotsametrics and the Floating World
""The best books make you think about our world in a

"Fabulous."
--"Time"
"A fascinating account of the international ocean shipping industry and the arena it operates in, the largely ungoverned open seas."
--"The Seattle Times
""Rose George beautifully captures the surprising nuances of this little-known world: beauty and privation, pathos and greed, tragedy and hilarity. Her strong, spare, gleaming prose steams along, powered by curiosity, compassion, outrage. As a writer, a reporter, and a human being, George is--stand by for nautical term--First Rate."
--Mary Roach, author of "Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal"
"For a modern seafaring adventure, there couldn't be a better guide than Rose George. Her intelligence, curiosity, and compassion shine through on every page to reveal a fascinating world that no one knows about, though it is fundamental to our economy and way of life."
--Chris Anderson, curator, TED Conference
"The two greatest stories are supposed to be 'A man goes on a journey' and 'A stranger comes to town.' In this enthralling, literally wide-ranging book, Rose George tells both: she goes on a voyage that few other journalists have accomplished, and she unveils the unknown seafarers who bring us all the world's goods. Her sympathetic, deeply reported, and unexpectedly poignant account reveals the private, prickly, brave tribe on which much of our daily lives, and most of the world's interlinked economies, depend."
--Maryn McKenna, author of "Superbug: The Fatal Menace of MRSA
""To the classic incredible journeys--"Moby Dick," "Two Years Before the Mast"--Rose George adds another, her voyage round the world aboard a container ship, revealing what happens before the big bang of merchandise explodes from the high seas into civilization via cargo containers holding thousands of sneakers, millions of plastic bags, and trillions of other products."
--Curtis C. Ebbesmeyer, coauthor of "Flotsametrics and the Floating World
""The best books make

"Engrossing and revelatory... George not only explores a little-known world of commerce but also introduces readers to the many people who make shipping possible. That she does so with great empathy and self-effacing humor, much like Mary Roach, makes her subjects especially appealing.... George's book is packed with telling anecdotes and detailed accounts, some funny, some shocking. If there's a downside to her seafaring, it's that it comes to an end too soon."
"--San Francisco Chronicle
""A fascinating account of the international ocean shipping industry and the arena it operates in, the largely ungoverned open seas."
--"The Seattle Times
""Mind-blowing... With its wide scope, voice of intellectual curiosity, and inter-ocean adventure, the book is reminiscent of Donovan Hohn's popular "Moby Duck.""
"--The Atlantic
""Fabulous."
--"Time
""Worth comparing to John McPhee's "Looking for a Ship.".. Offers a fascinating look at an anonymous industry affecting our daily lives, and gives a personal face to those working in that industry."
"--The Daily News" (Galveston)
"Consistently illuminating in-depth analysis... An eye-opening maritime expose."
"--Kirkus Reviews
""
""Rose George beautifully captures the surprising nuances of this little-known world: beauty and privation, pathos and greed, tragedy and hilarity. Her strong, spare, gleaming prose steams along, powered by curiosity, compassion, outrage. As a writer, a reporter, and a human being, George is--stand by for nautical term--First Rate."
--Mary Roach, author of "Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal"
"For a modern seafaring adventure, there couldn't be a better guide than Rose George. Her intelligence, curiosity, and compassion shine through on every page to reveal a fascinating world that no one knows about, though it is fundamental to our economy and way of life."
--Chris Anderson, curator, TED Conference
"The two greatest stories

"Consistently absorbing... Timely as well as deft... George's spirited book cracks open a vast, treacherous and largely ignored world."
--"The New York Times
""Engrossing and revelatory... George not only explores a little-known world of commerce but also introduces readers to the many people who make shipping possible. That she does so with great empathy and self-effacing humor, much like Mary Roach, makes her subjects especially appealing.... George's book is packed with telling anecdotes and detailed accounts, some funny, some shocking. If there's a downside to her seafaring, it's that it comes to an end too soon."
"--San Francisco Chronicle
""A fascinating account of the international ocean shipping industry and the arena it operates in, the largely ungoverned open seas."
--"The Seattle Times
""Mind-blowing... With its wide scope, voice of intellectual curiosity, and inter-ocean adventure, the book is reminiscent of Donovan Hohn's popular "Moby Duck.""
"--The Atlantic
""Fabulous."
--"Time
""Heart-stopping, mind-boggling... A superb book, well-written and bravely researched at sea."
"--Energy Metro Desk"
"Worth comparing to John McPhee's "Looking for a Ship.".. Offers a fascinating look at an anonymous industry affecting our daily lives, and gives a personal face to those working in that industry."
"--The Daily News" (Galveston)
"Consistently illuminating in-depth analysis... An eye-opening maritime expose."
"--Kirkus Reviews
""
""Rose George beautifully captures the surprising nuances of this little-known world: beauty and privation, pathos and greed, tragedy and hilarity. Her strong, spare, gleaming prose steams along, powered by curiosity, compassion, outrage. As a writer, a reporter, and a human being, George is--stand by for nautical term--First Rate."
--Mary Roach, author of "Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal"
"For a modern seafaring adventure, there couldn't be a better guide than Rose George. Her intelligence, curiosity, and compassion shine through on every page to reveal a fascinating world that no one knows about, though it is fundamental to our economy and way of life."
--Chris Anderson, curator, TED Conference
"The two greatest stories are supposed to be 'A man goes on a journey' and 'A stranger comes to town.' In this enthralling, literally wide-ranging book, Rose George tells both: she goes on a voyage that few other journalists have accomplished, and she unveils the unknown seafarers who bring us all the world's goods. Her sympathetic, deeply reported, and unexpectedly poignant account reveals the private, prickly, brave tribe on which much of our daily lives, and most of the world's interlinked economies, depend."
--Maryn McKenna, author of "Superbug: The Fatal Menace of MRSA
""To the classic incredible journeys--"Moby Dick," "Two Years Before the Mast"--Rose George adds another, her voyage round the world aboard a container ship, revealing what happens before the big bang of merchandise explodes from the high seas into civilization via cargo containers holding thousands of sneakers, millions of plastic bags, and trillions of other products."
--Curtis C. Ebbesmeyer, coauthor of "Flotsametrics and the Floating World
""The best books make you think about our world in a new way, and "Ninety Percent of Everything" is definitely one of those books. In this smart, lucid, and often beautiful investigation of the little-known world of freight shipping, Rose George finds new ways to illuminate our impact on the planet and explore that restless sense of motion that so often defines who are."
--Deborah Blum, author of "The Poisoner's Handbook: Murder and the Birth of Forensic Medicine in Jazz Age New York
""Rose George, with her precise and beautiful clarity of prose, has now fired a brilliant star-shell over the wine-dark sea and the ships that pass in its night, illuminating the details of the invisible ocean industry that is, and always will be, essential to all of us."
--Simon Winchester, author of "Atlantic: Great Sea Battles, Heroic Discoveries, Titanic Storms, and a Vast Ocean of a Million Stories"

Consistently absorbing Timely as well as deft George's spirited book cracks open a vast, treacherous and largely ignored world. "The New York Times"

Engrossing and revelatory George not only explores a little-known world of commerce but also introduces readers to the many people who make shipping possible. That she does so with great empathy and self-effacing humor, much like Mary Roach, makes her subjects especially appealing. George's book is packed with telling anecdotes and detailed accounts, some funny, some shocking. If there's a downside to her seafaring, it's that it comes to an end too soon. "San Francisco Chronicle"

A fascinating account of the international ocean shipping industry and the arena it operates in, the largely ungoverned open seas. "The Seattle Times"

Mind-blowing With its wide scope, voice of intellectual curiosity, and inter-ocean adventure, the book is reminiscent of Donovan Hohn's popular "Moby Duck." "The Atlantic"

Fabulous. "Time"

Heart-stopping, mind-boggling... A superb book, well-written and bravely researched at sea. "Energy Metro Desk"

Worth comparing to John McPhee's "Looking for a Ship" Offers a fascinating look at an anonymous industry affecting our daily lives, and gives a personal face to those working in that industry. "The Daily News (Galveston)"

Consistently illuminating in-depth analysis An eye-opening maritime expose. "Kirkus Reviews"

Rose George beautifully captures the surprising nuances of this little-known world: beauty and privation, pathos and greed, tragedy and hilarity. Her strong, spare, gleaming prose steams along, powered by curiosity, compassion, outrage. As a writer, a reporter, and a human being, George is--stand by for nautical term--First Rate. "Mary Roach, author of Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal"

For a modern seafaring adventure, there couldn't be a better guide than Rose George. Her intelligence, curiosity, and compassion shine through on every page to reveal a fascinating world that no one knows about, though it is fundamental to our economy and way of life. "Chris Anderson, curator, TED Conference"

The two greatest stories are supposed to be A man goes on a journey' and A stranger comes to town.' In this enthralling, literally wide-ranging book, Rose George tells both: she goes on a voyage that few other journalists have accomplished, and she unveils the unknown seafarers who bring us all the world's goods. Her sympathetic, deeply reported, and unexpectedly poignant account reveals the private, prickly, brave tribe on which much of our daily lives, and most of the world's interlinked economies, depend. "Maryn McKenna, author of Superbug: The Fatal Menace of MRSA"

To the classic incredible journeys--"Moby Dick," "Two Years Before the Mast"--Rose George adds another, her voyage round the world aboard a container ship, revealing what happens before the big bang of merchandise explodes from the high seas into civilization via cargo containers holding thousands of sneakers, millions of plastic bags, and trillions of other products. "Curtis C. Ebbesmeyer, coauthor of Flotsametrics and the Floating World"

The best books make you think about our world in a new way, and "Ninety Percent of Everything" is definitely one of those books. In this smart, lucid, and often beautiful investigation of the little-known world of freight shipping, Rose George finds new ways to illuminate our impact on the planet and explore that restless sense of motion that so often defines who are. "Deborah Blum, author of The Poisoner's Handbook: Murder and the Birth of Forensic Medicine in Jazz Age New York"

Rose George, with her precise and beautiful clarity of prose, has now fired a brilliant star-shell over the wine-dark sea and the ships that pass in its night, illuminating the details of the invisible ocean industry that is, and always will be, essential to all of us. "Simon Winchester, author of Atlantic: Great Sea Battles, Heroic Discoveries, Titanic Storms, and a Vast Ocean of a Million Stories""

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

Rose George is the author of "Ninety Percent of Everything: Inside Shipping, the Invisible Industry That Puts Clothes on Your Back, Gas in Your Car, and Food on Your Plate," "The Big Necessity: The Unmentionable World of Human Waste and Why It Matters" and "A Life Removed: Hunting for Refuge in the Modern World." A freelance journalist, she has written for "The New York Times," "Slate," "Harpers," and the "Financial Times." She lives in London.


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Wissen besteht aus geordneten Informationen. Informationen kommen aus dem Internet (wenn ich sie finde), für die Ordnung bin ich selbst zuständig oder ich lasse mich von Büchern, Zeitungen etc unterstützen. Rose George ist eine große Sortiererin vor dem Herrn und lässt sich gut lesen (englisch). Dass die Waren dieser Welt hauptsächlich in Containern transportiert werden ist bekannt. Dass die größte Containerreederei im 3-Millionen Staat Dänemark residiert und nach Umsatz und Gewinn Microsoft nahe kommt, wohl weniger. Dass außerhalb der 12-Meilenzone das Recht des Landes gilt, unter dem das Schiff ausgeflaggt ist -- allso Liberias -- Panamas oder -- staunen Sie -- das Recht der Mongolei. Will nun einSeemann gegen seine Reederei klagen -- wie kommt er in die Mongolei? Nicht nur bei den Produktionsbedingungen unserer Waren liegt viel im Argen, auch ihr Transport findet z.T. unter menschenunwürdigen Bedingungen statt. Die Autorin behandelt viele Themen wie Piraterie, Umweltverschmutzung und viele mehr. Sie fängt furios an und lässt dann etwas nach. Auch der schwächere Teil ist soweit über dem Durchschnitt, dass man gerne 5 1/2 Sterne vergeben würde, wenn dies denn ginge
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Von Peer Sylvester TOP 1000 REZENSENT am 4. Dezember 2015
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
90% aller Waren wurden durch Schiffe transportiert. 90%! Ohne Schiffe gäbe es keine Globalisierung. Dasselbe lässt sich übrigens auch über Container sagen, denn ohne Container könnten Waren nicht verschifft werden und wir hätten deutlich weniger Produkte und müssten deutlich mehr zahlen Um so erstaunlicher, dass die Schifffahrtsindustrie weitestgehend unbekannt agiert. Kaum einer weiß Seeleute zu schätzen, kaum einer weiß, wie sehr unsere Wirtschaft von Schiffen abhängt. Rose George ändert das mit diesem tollen Buch! Sie geht an Deck eines Transporters und fährt mit diesem von England nach Singapur.Unterwegs berichtet sie vom Schiffahrtsleben, aber wie Bryson oder Roach baut sie zahlreiche Anekdoten ein und erzählt auch viel drumrum: Über die großen Firmen, über die Billigländer, aber auch über Piraten und deren Taten, über die Pirateneinsätze, über Wale und wie die steigende Schiffahrtsindustrie diese beeinflusst, über die Rolle der Priester in den Seefahrtsmissionen, darüber wie Seeleute ausgebeutet wurden. Über Havarien und über die Rolle von Seeleuten im Krieg.
Mit anderen Worten: Man merkt der Autorin an, dass sie großes Interesse am, Thema hat und selbst sehr neugierig ist - Das sind meine Lieblingsbücher! Ich kann dieses Buch wirklich jedem ans Herz legen und man wird überrascht sein, wie wichtig dieses Buch eigentlich ist, aber auch wie interessant!
Noch eine Anmerkung: "Deep Sea and Ocean going" und "Ninety percent of Everything" sind bis auf Titel und Coverbild identisch.
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the book gives a very holistic insight into the shipping industry -ranging from work conditions over environmental aspects up to piracy... one does look at shipping & transport with different eyes after reading it!
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Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.1 von 5 Sternen 184 Rezensionen
75 von 80 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Fascinating view behind the scenes. 16. August 2013
Von Chris - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
I have lived in Savannah, Georgia for about eight years now. Savannah is one of the busiest ports in the US (around 4th place). When you get near the river, you can see the massive container ships come right up the Savannah River. As a student I always wondered what sort of people work on boats like that and what their lives are like. Despite the volume of cargo moving in and out, most people here are only dimly aware about what goes on in the port and what's being shipped. The port is in an industrial part of town and the security is tight, so you can't just have a stroll around the docks.
I thoroughly enjoyed this book, because it answered some of my many questions. Savannahians in particular (including myself) and people in general don't understand how much our modern world with all its international foods and products rests on maritime transportation. In an early chapter, the author, Rose George, does a non-scientific, man-on-the-street survey of people, so see if they know what percentage of goods comes by sea. The highest guess she got was thirty percent. As the title implies, it's three times that. Most people assume our goods come via plane because they're some much quicker. Container ships may move at a relatively glacial pace, but they cannot be beat for cost-effictiveness. In one of the most shocking lines of the book, the reader finds that it is cheaper to have fish caught in Scotland, frozen and shipped to China to be filleted, and then frozen and shipped back to be sold in Scottish grocery stores, RATHER than pay to Scottish workers to process the fish. The obsession with the bottom-line boggles my mind in this case, but it gives the reader an idea that shipping by boat only adds a penny or two to the cost of most goods.
Ms. George manages to book a passage on a Danish cargo ship that is captained by an experienced British mariner. There were many bits of this book I found surprising. To begin with, sailors that work for this particular copy are unable to drink alcohol, even when while in port. With the speed at which container ships are off and re-loaded, the crew would only hae a few hours to drink anyway. To paraphrase the captain," I used to wonder if I could catch dinner, now I wonder if I can pick up a newspaper."
Most of the ships are now crewed by a mixture of nationalities with a heavy concentration of Filipinos (because they'll work for low wages and many speak English). It's appalling to find how often sailors are screwed out of their wages and treated shabbily in general by officers, the shipping companies, or the employment agencies. Companies are able to get away with abuses in part because of the flag of convenience rule, which allows ships to register with nations like Liberia or Panama, countries that have relatively lax regulations.
There are eleven chapters, all of them dealing with different aspects of shipping and life at sea and two chapters devoted to piracy. I was most interested in the chapters on shipwrecks and rescue at sea. I was dismayed to learn that it is becoming more common for cargo ships to ignore distress signals so they can stick to their schedules.
I thoroughly enjoyed this book. The chapter on maritime shipping's effect only whales was only part of the book I found a bit dull. I hope that the book gains a wide readership and the public becomes more aware of the difficult conditions sailors live under so we can have cheap goods.
30 von 32 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Interesting but loses its way 16. Oktober 2013
Von R. C Sheehy - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
I was really interested in Rose George's book but I do think it lost its way. What started as a great book which explores the vital role shipping plays in our global economy. However it seems to wander off course. It has a big section on piracy which of course is required but it seems like this changes the tenor of the book. What was a shipping book is now focused on piracy. This seems to take the wind out of the sails of the work. Now we lose focus on the shipping industry and all it entails. Some interesting side topics like the bizarre hiring practices and the cloistered nature of the business. The issue on safety is compelling but under utilized as is the nature of crew interaction or lack of.

This is a good book which does a good job of trying but really loses track and misses out on some great opportunities.
29 von 33 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen Superficial 28. Oktober 2013
Von JLGEEE - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verifizierter Kauf
I found this book enlightening in some ways but feel Ms. George missed many opportunities to produce a comprehensive and revealing account of this vital link in world trade. As someone who spent a good part of a career arranging finance for ships like the Maersk Kendal I purchased the book hoping it would provide the ordinary reader some insights into both the daily routine of the seamen and the ways in which the container liner industry has revolutionized world trade. It does, but not nearly enough.

I found the description of the day to day activity of the crew and the threat of pirates interesting as far as they went. However, Ms. George appears to have been somewhat stymied by an uncommunicative Captain and crew and by the lack of contact with anything approaching a real pirate. She therefore drifts off into discussions of whales and shipwrecks, seemingly in an attempt to fill out the rest of the book. I am afraid she completely missed the opportunity to talk about, among other things, the impact this technology has, together with the internet, in enabling Tom Friedman's flat world. Any book about the container industry that fails to even mention Walmart seems shallow and sadly lacking.
30 von 35 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen One hand for you, and one for the ship. 28. August 2013
Von SInohey - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
This has to be one of the more enjoyable books of the summer. Rose George has once more written a book about a subject that most people don't spend much time wondering about; and has plunged wholeheartedly into the matter. Her last offering, The Big Necessity was elucidating the journey of human waste from production to terminal disposal, and for that, she went wading into the muck of sewers to get a first hand experience of the excursion.
This time Rose joined the merchant marine, not "to see the world" as the saying goes, but to experience the life of seafarers, mostly ignored by the rest of society. She began her journey of "thirty-nine days at sea, six ports, two oceans, five seas, and the most compellingly foreign environment she is ever likely to encounter" when she boarded the Danish container ship, Maersk Kendal "from the southern English port of Felixstowe to Singapore for five weeks and 9,288 nautical miles through the pillars of Hercules, pirate waters and weather."
Along the way she experiences the excitement of discovery and the boredom of unrelenting monotony. She witnesses the hardships and injustice meted to the seamen on board, the long working hours (illegal in most countries), poor pay, cramped quarters, unhygienic environment and crimes from petty theft to rapes and even murder; all adjudicated by the unquestioned authority of the ship's captain.
"we were told that the captain is our god; he can marry you, baptize you, and even bury you without anybody's permission. We were told that the sea is no-man's-land and that what happens at sea stays at sea."

Ms. George takes on the ship owners, mostly unknown, (hiding behind layers of corporations and flags of convenience) the crooked and the scrupulous ones answer to almost no authority, and how the International Transport Workers'Federation that represents four million "continue to allow astonishing abuses of human rights of those working in the sector. . . . Seafarers and fishers are routinely made to work in conditions that would not be acceptable in civilized society."

The author also underlines the plight of the abused hundreds of seamen held captive by Somali pirates and bemoans the lack of international outrage, serious rescue efforts, and state cowardice. Her disgust is manifested at the Harvard Business School's choice of Somali pirates as the best business model for 2010. Pirates are violent criminals who killed 67 hostages between 1997 and 2010 and held 544 hostages to date.

Ms. George describes the evolution of maritime shipping from before the 1970s, when transport by sea was not financially attractive because costs of shipping ate up most of the profits, until Malcolm Maclean developed the stacked container concept in the late 1960s; "and it was called 'multi-modal,' meaning it could be transported from ship to a truck to a train. His idea was that this would create extreme efficiency, and he was right."
Presently over one hundred thousand ships transport 99% of all cargo across the globe. The vessels are exponentially increasing in size and capacity. An average sized vessel is about 3 football fields long (300 meters long and 40 m. wide) and carries thousands of tons of goods. Its is capable of unloading and reloading its full capacity in one day, thanks to the highly advanced, mechanized technologies of modern ports.
However, only 5% of the 17 million containers are physically inspected in US ports each year. The lax security probably allows unlawful immigration, human trafficking, illegal drugs and merchandise to enter the country unhindered.
The ships also create material (sewage & oil) contamination of the oceans, as well as acoustic pollution (by the engines and propellers), which interferes with sound communication of many sea creatures.

Ms. George relates her experience through fair weather and foul, battling seasickness, chasing and evading pirates, whale watching and observing the damage by fishing trawlers to whales, (for which she dedicates a chapter). She expounds on all subjects maritime, from the difficulty of sea rescues, being adrift at sea, shipwrecks and cost to human lives and cargo, and books about ships in general, and a plea to recognize WWll merchant mariners for their service and gallantry. Facts & figures are knitted into captivating tales and anecdotes (such as Winston Churchills funeral). She keeps the reader interested, entertained and well informed about a subject arcane to most people.

This is a smartly written book, the syntax is crisp and the prose flows lucidly. Readers interested in global economics, or those who enjoy seafaring adventures, would certainly appreciate this fascinating book.

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33 von 40 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Not the Box 5. September 2013
Von john howe - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
The ship board experience of a reporter /writer on board a container freighter reveals elements of exploitation of sailors and safety and environmental regulations which are revealing. Yet the "Outlaw Sea" gives a better account of this element of shipping and the "Box" a better account on shipping revolution in containerization . Since the author was a passenger, she did not capture the experience of ship board work.

The chapter on Piracy was probably the most interesting and informative chapter and the tension produced on board ship in the Indian Ocean was easy to imagine.

The book is an easy and enjoyable read. It does inform and does demonstrate how the merchant marine makes globalization possible.
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