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Nigger: The Strange Career of a Troublesome Word (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 14. Januar 2003


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Produktinformation

Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

Nigger is Harvard law professor Randall Kennedy's ornate, lively monograph on what he calls the "paradigmatic" racial slur in the English language. A neutral noun in the 17th century, nigger had, by 1830, become an "influential" insult. Kennedy traces the word's history in literature, song, film, politics, sports, everyday speech, and the courtroom. He also discusses its plastic, contradictory, and volatile place in contemporary American society. Should it be eradicated from dictionaries and the language? Should it be, somehow, regulated? What is the significance of its emergence among some blacks as a term with "undertones of warmth and good will"? Do blacks have a historical right to its use or does that place the term under a "protectionist pall"? With courage and grave measure Kennedy has, in effect, created a forum for discussion of the word he calls a "reminder of the ironies and dilemmas, the tragedies and glories, of the American experience." --H. O'Billovitch -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine vergriffene oder nicht verfügbare Ausgabe dieses Titels.

Pressestimmen

“Provocative. . . . engaging and informative.” —The New York Times

“Should be required reading. . . . This little book deserves to be read especially if we seek better understanding of ourselves and others.” –The Dallas Morning News

“Demonstrates a key truth about the N-word. . . . it tracks our racial history and stars in a slew of court decisions that reveal large truths about bigotry and free expression.”–Philadelphia Inquirer

“A detailed, well-researched book. . . . Kennedy boils centuries of usage–in conversation, literature, legal proceedings–down to the most pertinent and instructive.” –San Francisco Chronicle

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Amazon.com: 4.1 von 5 Sternen 84 Rezensionen
19 von 21 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Exploring the Strange Life of a Complex Word 2. März 2002
Von Cheryl D. Fields - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
As someone who has spent nearly a decade writing about race relations in the U.S., I couldn't read this book fast enough.
Kennedy offers a well-timed examination of a word that appears to be experiencing a revival of public usage. I didn't agree with all of his conclusions, but the book certainly provokes critical thought. I especially appreciated the section that lays out how the word has been considered by the U.S. courts.
This book should be mandatory reading for all Americans. It is a worthy addition to any to high school or college social studies syllabus, and a good choice for book clubs that welcome heated debate.
13 von 15 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Great introduction to open minds 25. Februar 2005
Von Kevin J. Lang - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
What I expected was some sort of "Angry black man' book. What was interesting is that he let the facts speak for themselves; keeping a lot of his personal views out of it. His writing style definitely revealed a bad taste in his mouth but he kept true to why he was writing this. I read this cover to cover (repeating a chapter or 4) with in a week. Normally I read 3 books at a time but this one demanded my attention. I read that a lot of people find this book inadequate. If they want to think so - fine. However, no single 208 page book is going to be able to nail this subject down perfectly. He had made his point profoundly and left a person wanting more; which is a sign of a good author.
21 von 26 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen I wish I could read the book he didn't write ... 9. Oktober 2011
Von WR - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
If the question is scholarship and clarity, no fault can be found with Randall Kennedy's [N-word]: The Strange Career of a Troublesome Word. And if that is so, what makes Kennedy's book so ultimately unsatisfying? Perhaps it is the sense that Kennedy, who is eternally fair-minded (at times, perhaps, even to a fault), never quite seems to get his arms entirely around his topic. Indeed, if Kennedy is always rational in pronouncing his phlegmatic judgments on various famous and infamous uses of the "troublesome" word, the fact is that his reasons for considering one episode defensible and identifying another as certifiably hateful and racist are not entirely coherent. To say it another way, if the reader were to ask Kennedy to define when, by whom, and under what circumstances "[N-word]" can be deployed legitimately, it is doubtful that he could express a practical philosophy, even in the broadest of terms. Or to put the matter in still other words, Kennedy is just like many of the rest of us: appalled by the use of the word in contexts in which it is clearly intended to injure, more than occasionally troubled by its prevalence in everyday discourse, ambivalent about its modern-day dispersal as a (quite literal) shibboleth, and intellectually muddled over how to confront the word in its undeniable position as both linguistic fingerprint and American literary instrument. But if that is the case, what purpose does Kennedy's book actually serve? Those who have spent any time at all thinking about the word and its uses (and, by extension, about American-style racism) won't find, in [N-word], much they didn't already know; those who haven't considered the topic are unlikely to read such a book; and those looking for legitimation and permission (it is, after all, a black man saying that even white people sometimes have the right to say "[N-word]") will go away with their oversimplifications intact. In fairness to Kennedy and his obvious gravitas, perhaps we are meant to content ourselves with just what his subtitle--The Strange Career of a Troublesome Word--suggests: a linguistic-historical review. The major disappointment of [N-word], however, is that, having spent 200 pages laying the perfect groundwork from which to launch a potentially enlightening discussion, Kennedy closes the book. One suspects that a writer and thinker with Kennedy's clear admiration for scholarly exactitude might have provided both significant insight and indispensable reflection on the matter, but he rarely goes beneath the surface. We cannot know whether Kennedy's courage failed him or whether he simply lost interest in the subject, but [N-word] is one of those cases in which the reader has every right to regret the book that wasn't written. (P.S. As if to underscore some of the points Kennedy makes, Amazon refused to post this review with the actual title word in it - that word is on Amazon's "bad word" list and triggers an automatic rejection of the review. That is, quite frankly, exactly the kind of stupidity that Kennedy takes aim at.)
14 von 18 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A great history book. 6. März 2002
Von Anthony J. Wilson - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
I decided to buy this book after seeing it on 60 minutes and Boston Public. I must admit that I had to buy this book on Amazon because I am white and I didn't feel comfortable buying a book with such a racially charged word as the title. None the less I am glad I bought this book. I will admit that when it comes to African American history I am pretty ignorant and this book helped rid me of some of the ignorance. I am not a racist person but I really need to learn more about African American culture. I was brought up in an almost all white area and many people in my family have racist views. This book gave me a look in a society that I would not have normally seen... I really recommend this book to any one of any race in any country.
36 von 50 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Reviewed on National Public Radio 10. Januar 2002
Von Verne Robinson - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
I learned of this amazing work from an interview with the author on National Public Radio while driving home. Couldn't get to a computer fast enough and logon to ... to order it.
I had no idea why this word is so bad. Now I do. Oh, my God! The author brought back memories of the horrible things done to blacks. He made it clear why this word is said only to harm and hurt. His presentation was like cold water dumped on me - I forgot what it was like in the south when I was a kid.
People get fired from jobs for saying it, sued, and worse! I am grateful to the author for a much needed and overdue book on this topic. Those of us in media and law desperately need this!
Everyone should be made aware that the N-word is a HATE word. It is meant only to injure a human being.
Interestingly, Kennedy trapped me with pages of N-word jokes from a KKKomedy web site. He makes it easy to see how seductive it is to laugh at these jokes. That is sobering in itself. His writing is so clear, easy to follow, and illuminating - a Rhodes Scholar, indeed! Bravo Kennedy! A perfect little book about a huge problem. Well done.
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