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Modern Man: The Life of Le Corbusier, Architect of Tomorrow (Englisch) Audio-CD – Audiobook, 4. November 2014


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Audio-CD, Audiobook, 4. November 2014
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-- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: MP3 CD.
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Produktinformation

Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

"The Jacobs/Moses war was educational, a living curriculum now encapsulated in Flint’s excellent study."—The New York Review of Books

 

"[A] winning account . . . dramatically described . . . [Anthony] Flint looks at a seminal struggle of twentieth-century city planning, one that involved two giants with utterly differing views of how cities should look and develop."—The Boston Globe

 

"[This book] shows how these mythic characters shaped each other’s work and reputations. . . . If there’s such a thing as beach reading for the urban studies set, it’s Wrestling with Moses."—San Francisco Chronicle

 

"Lively and informative . . . Wrestling with Moses is about those who fought back against the power broker and in so doing helped set the stage for the city’s revitalization."—The Wall Street Journal

 

"Engaging, vivid and provocative work. Written with analytical rigor but also a crafty journalistic eye for the human-interest story that crystallizes an abstract theme, this book merits inclusion in any library."—Library Journal on This Land: The Battle over Sprawl and the Future of America

 

 

  -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: MP3 CD.

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

Anthony Flint is the author of two previous books: Wrestling with Moses and This Land. A former Boston Globe reporter, he is a fellow at the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy and contributes to The Atlantic Cities website.

-- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: MP3 CD.

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Amazon.com: 4.0 von 5 Sternen 36 Rezensionen
13 von 13 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Short and To the Point, but Without Context or Insight into Corbusier's Character. 9. November 2014
Von mirasreviews - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Vine Kundenrezension eines kostenfreien Produkts ( Was ist das? )
Modern Man: The Life of Le Corbusier, Architect of Tomorrow" is a light biography of the pioneering modernist architect Le Corbusier and his major works by Anthony Flint, who is a journalist and policy advisor on planning and development. Written in a literate but breezy style, it introduces the reader to some of the concepts that propelled modernist architecture for half a century and to its most obsessive and ideological proponent, "the original star architect", Le Corbusier. The author jumps right into 1929, as Le Corbusier returns to Europe from Argentina, where he met and bedded Josephine Baker. Flint name-drops a lot, but Le Corbusier did live in an interesting time and knew many famous people. He flashes back to Le Corbusier's Swiss origins -he was born Charles-Édouard Jeanneret-Gris- and early career by way of background, but there is never much context for Le Corbusier's life and work. The book is short and its focus narrow.

Le Corbusier designed 78 buildings that were completed in 12 countries. Flint's descriptions focus on the architect's most famous and influential works. There are enthusiastic descriptions of the circumstances under which the works were built and of the buildings themselves: Villa Jeanneret-Perret (Maison Blanche), Villa Savoye, Unité d'Habitation at Marseilles, United Nations Headquarters, Chapel of Notre Dame de Haut at Ronchamp, Chandigarh in India, the cabanon in Roquebrune-Cap-Martin, and Harvard University's Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts. Flint acknowledges the collaborative nature of the UN Headquarters design but barely mentions other architects on the project in Chandigarh, and I believe many of those buildings were designed by others. The focus of "Modern Man" is very strongly on Le Corbusier. We don't get any insight into how his atelier worked or the roles that others played in Le Corbusier designs.

"Modern Man" is intended for a lay audience. Buildings are not described in technical or historical terms but in terms everyone can understand. The author's intentions and audience are puzzling, though. The book won't appeal to students of architecture, as it lacks depth in that area. It won't appeal to fans of artist biographies, as we never know much about Le Corbusier beyond that was an imperious, arrogant, and difficult personality, driven by a utopian dream of imposing maximum order and affordable modern housing on the urban landscape. He is one-dimensional, and there is no insight into his method of working, thought processes, or personal life outside of marriage to an alcoholic with whom he had little in common. Le Corbusier interacted with a lot of influential people, but Flint's focus is narrow. I assume the book is intended to introduce laypersons to a force in architecture whose enduring influence is all around them.

But "Modern Man" gives the impression that the publisher's mandate was to make it short and easy to understand. Mission accomplished, but there is no context for Le Corbusier's modernist ideas or even an explanation of what those ideas were, why they emerged in the 20th century, and what they were trying to accomplish. We get only Le Corbusier's four requirements for a contemporary building, which he published in 1927: pilotis (stilts), flat roof, free plan, free façade. We need historical context -some idea of what came before and why and how it changed. I also felt that the reader needs some insight into the process of designing -how the atelier functioned, the roles of other designers, what, exactly, did Le Corbusier and his colleagues do. I found the book lopsided toward descriptions of buildings without any context. In the Epilogue, Flint discusses the backlash against modernism and Le Corbusier in particular, as well as his lasting influence.
9 von 9 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Starchitect 2. November 2014
Von Found Highways - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Vine Kundenrezension eines kostenfreien Produkts ( Was ist das? )
It was touch and go as to whether I was going to read past the first few pages of Modern Man: The Life of Le Corbusier, Architect of Tomorrow. Wew find Le Corbusier and Josephine Baker in a stateroom on a cruise ship returning to Europe from South America. The author tells us what Le Corbusier is thinking and how he is propping himself up on an elbow and how crisp the sheets are.

Since this is a biography of Le Corbusier, and not a novel about his life, I was surprised to find what appears to be speculation and outright imagination. It is certainly possible to write history that is both accurate and lively without resorting to making things up. I enjoy Candice Millard's and Matthew Algeo's histories for example. Lynne Olson and Dominic Sandbrook also come to mind as historians who can back up every statement and tell a great story at the same time.

But I'm glad I kept on with Modern Man, because the imagined thoughts were not frequent, and I really wanted to know a little about the first "starchitect." This was quite a good book for someone like me who has no background in architecture, but would like to learn a little, but is more interested in the man and the times.

Le Corbusier, who early on decided to go by the single name, a made up one at that, may well have been a brilliant architect, but that seems to be debatable. What is certain is that he was a master self-promoter and odd character. It's amazing what you can get away with if people think you are a genius. He joined the Vichy government as soon as it was in place and then when the Americans were on the way, he switched to their side without missing a beat. Everyone, including DeGaulle, knew Le Corbusier was lying when he claimed to have been in the Resistance, but they overlooked it.

A decent introduction to the man and the pioneer star architect.
10 von 11 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Novelized biography 12. Oktober 2014
Von Margaret P. - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Vine Kundenrezension eines kostenfreien Produkts ( Was ist das? )
"Modern Man" is a novelized version of the life of Le Corbusier, the most influential architect of the twentieth century. It opens with a description of Le Corbusier lying in bed in a cabin on the ship from Rio to Le Havre, watching Josephine Baker's chest rise and fall, pointedly noting the white sheets and black sea. It does not shy from sensationalizing anything with a whiff of scandal, whether documented or presumed.

The author is a journalist and sources are provided, but this book could not be categorized as an academic text. It is more akin to the lurid unauthorized biographies of living celebrities, and the back cover states unabashedly and unequivocally that the author has constructed "a vivid story." It is a broad biography and is not intended to be an examination of any particular aspect of Le Corbusier's work. It delves into details at times, but at under 250 pages of text, cannot be considered to be exhaustive or even complete, and is unlikely to be used as an academic reference.

I was left wondering about who the book was written for and who will actually read it. No special knowledge of architecture or related arts is assumed, although the intended reader would have to be interested in Le Corbusier to be bothered to read it. Architects and similar professionals who do read it are likely to be disappointed that it is not written by one of their own, as that is frequently and sometimes awkwardly evident.
2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Wouter Jansen's Review of Anthony Flint's "Modern Man: The Life of Le Corbusier" 26. Dezember 2015
Von Arthur M. Diamond, Jr. - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verifizierter Kauf
Wouter Jansen's review was made as part of a critical review assignment for the Fall 2015 Economics of Entrepreneurship seminar at the University of Nebraska Omaha, taught by Art Diamond. (The course syllabus stated that part of the critical review assignment consisted of the making of a video recording of the review, and the posting of the review to Amazon.)
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Starchitect 16. Mai 2015
Von takingadayoff - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
It was touch and go as to whether I was going to read past the first few pages of Modern Man: The Life of Le Corbusier, Architect of Tomorrow. The book begins with Le Corbusier and Josephine Baker in a stateroom on a cruise ship returning to Europe from South America. The author tells us what Le Corbusier is thinking and how he is propping himself up on an elbow and how crisp the sheets are.

Since this is a biography of Le Corbusier, and not a novel about his life, I was surprised to find what appears to be speculation and outright imagination. It is certainly possible to write history that is both accurate and lively without resorting to making things up. I enjoy Candice Millard's and Matthew Algeo's histories for example. Lynne Olson and Dominic Sandbrook also come to mind as historians who can back up every statement and tell a great story at the same time.

But I'm glad I kept on with Modern Man, because the imagined thoughts were not frequent, and I really wanted to know a little about the first "starchitect." This was quite a good book for someone like me who has no background in architecture, but would like to learn a little, but is more interested in the man and the times.

Le Corbusier, who early on decided to go by the single name, a made up one at that, may well have been a brilliant architect, but that seems to be debatable. What is certain is that he was a master self-promoter and odd character. It's amazing what you can get away with if people think you are a genius. He joined the Vichy government as soon as it was in place and then when the Americans were on the way, he switched to their side without missing a beat. Everyone, including DeGaulle, knew Le Corbusier was lying when he claimed to have been in the Resistance, but they overlooked it.

A decent introduction to the man and the pioneer star architect.
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