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am 4. Mai 2014
Die Druckqualität ist einfach schlecht!
Das Buch sieht so aus, wenn man eine schlecht gescannte Kopie ausgedruckt hätte. Es gibt viele Formeln, die nicht klar zu sehen sind, viele kleine Symbole ist es schwer zu sehen. Probleme, die mit einer kleinen Schrift geschrieben sind, sind sehr schwer zu lesen. Von einer professionellen Druckerei wurde ich so eine Qualität nicht erwarten! Dieser Preis kostet das Buch sicher nicht!
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am 31. Juli 1998
This marvellous book of Landau, Lifshitz is the best adult presentation of "classical" classical mechanics, that is, leaving aside problems of stability, chaos, etc. With this proviso, the book is perfect. It is very short, not by omitting things, but by choosing (and rigidly adhering to it) a very sound philosophy: exploring the connection between symmetries and conservation laws. This explains why the dynamics is based on the action principle, which, as shown by Wigner, is the optimum language for expliciting the discoveries of Emmy Noether. The whole book follows this line, making the exposition very original and, at points, quite surprising (as when the mass is proved to be positive). In my opinion the climax of the book is the theory of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation, along the ideas of Jacobi. I know of no place where this is so admirably done. Simple and beautiful. After learning it, and the applications contained in the book, you can learn the miracles ! Landau and Lifshitz perform with this equation in all areas of physics, particularly in General Relativity.
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am 18. Mai 2011
One of the most significant moments in my Physics education came during my sophomore year in college. I decided to pick up a copy of "Mechanics" by Landau and Lifshitz that was on reserve in the library for the mechanics class that I was taking. This is the first volume in the internationally renowned series of textbooks on theoretical Physics, the series that has a reputation for its sparse and difficult writing style, as well as the undoubted difficulty and brilliance of the material presented. This is probably the reason why until that point I didn't even bother looking at these books, but for whatever reason that fateful night I decided to take a look at this particular volume. To my surprise, the book was actually pretty readable and the first few chapters revealed an entirely new way of looking at Physics. Until that point I was used to thinking about Physics as a set of laws and equations, relatively succinct but otherwise somewhat arbitrary and ad-hoc. Landau and Lifshitz's book started from a very different point; it gave some deep underlying principles as a starting point behind the development of physical laws and equations. Based on that I had a new and deeper appreciation of my chosen field of study, and I gained a whole new way of looking at the physical reality.

Granted, the book is really not a walk in the park. Many later chapters can be rather technically demanding, and a prior course on theoretical mechanics at college level is probably the minimal level of preparation that can get a reader through the whole text. There aren't all that many examples that are thoroughly worked out, but all of the problems are given (rather concise) solutions - you still need to fill in some of the more important steps on your own. Mechanics is not an area of active modern research, so this is not necessarily a book that will help one with their scientific careers. However, it provides a solid grounding in some of the most basic physical concepts, and the skills and techniques acquired here can be very important in other areas of Physics. All said, this is a classic textbook that anyone who is serious about a career in Physics would be well advised to go through.
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am 30. März 2000
As soon as you read the first page of this book, you'll soon understand that this book is not for using Physics.(or not for studying for your exams.) This book is a kind of "Stoicheia"(that was written by Euclid). So you might waste your time, especially if you don't want to know why "mass>=0" is mathematically true. But, if you are a mathematician or a logician or so on, (and want to learn Physics systematically,) this book must become your favorite. Remember, this book is not too mathematical. If you are good at mathematics, just read and learn the mathematical way of thinking for Phisics.
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am 11. Dezember 1999
Classical Mechanics by H. Goldstein was the assigned text for a senior year course on CM. In all fairness, Goldstein does introduce tools and concepts useful to more advanced study in the subject, so I would turn to G. for a second reading on these topics. He also discusses the connections between classical to quantum mechanics. Nevertheless, Landau's presentation of the core of CM is clearer and more direct. For learning about the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalisms, rigid body rotation, small oscillations and canonical transformation, I found Landau to be the better book.
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This is the Volume 1 of the famous Course of Theoretical Physics by L. D. Landau and E. M. Lifshitz. All serious students of theoretical physics must possess the ten volumes of this excellent Course, which cover in detail and rigour practically all the branches of theoretical physics. The Volume 1 treats the subject of classical mechanics in an elegant and logically correct way. The autors avoid tautological definitions of the basic mechanical quantities, taking as the starting point the Hamilton's principle of least action and Galileo's relativity principle. This book is indicated to all those who have some aqquaintance with mechanics and have the desire of solidify the knowledge of this important branch of theoretical physics. A classic!
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am 16. November 1999
be appreciated by reading this rather small book. Any born theorist will be awe-struck by this book. Any born theorist will want to be like-Lev after reading this book, I guarantee it.
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am 26. Oktober 1999
Landau & Lifshz "Course of Theoretical Physics"is a famous and respected set of books in Physics. Unfortunately, Butterworth-Heinemann, who currently prints those books in English, prints them with very poor quality. The books seems to be "printed" in old copy machines (old Xerox or Nashua machines) and the paper used is also a cheap one. In many pages, it is really hard to read the text, due to such poor printing.
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am 22. Februar 2000
Yes, yes, yes...this is a great physics book. BUT, for top dollar, for a paper back you should expect top quality. This version falls short. My copy was freshly delivered with some machine created folds pressed in pages through out the book. Also the book seems to be bound using paper with the grain going in the wrong direction resulting in a very "rumpled" looking new book. The book looks as though it were created on a copying machine. The content is great - the book is poor. Try the hard copy edition - don't waste your money on this poor quality paper back edition.
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am 21. Dezember 2003
Some professors prefer book this to Goldstein's because it stresses problem-solving over formalism. Like Goldstein, however, the problems are all of the integrable type and there is no training provided for analyzing nonintegrable (especially chaotic) dynamical systems. Worse, one does not learn what 'integability' is from this book because it is implicitly assumed that every problem is integrable. This error follows from failing to distinguish local from global integrability. If one may be excused for criticizing the Pope, the authors make wrong and completely misleading statements about integrability (see my review of Goldstein, and also ch. 16 of my book Classical Mechanics, Cambridge, 1997). The problems and examples are indeed more challenging than those in Goldstein, and are instructive, but the text makes no contact whatsoever with the ideas and methods of modern nonlinear dynamics, in spite of the fact that (as Poincare, Arnol'd and others have shown), most of classical mechanics IS nonlinear dynamics. In other words, a student learns little from this text that is useful for research in theoretical mechanics these days. In my newer text I develope Poincare's method of qualitative analysis, and then assign as homework problems many numerical problems where in addition the students are required to check the accuracy of forward integrations in time by integrating backward to try to recover the initial conditions to within at least one digit accuracy. My text was tested for several years teaching both physics and mechanical engineering students at the graduate level, and with success. Try my text, you may find that you like it, especially since it's readability compares more with that of Goldstein than with Arnol'd.
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