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Master Harold . . . And The Boys (Plays, Penguin) (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 6. November 1984

3.7 von 5 Sternen 3 Kundenrezensionen

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Taschenbuch, 6. November 1984
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-- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: Audio CD.
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Synopsis

An argument between Master Harold, a seventeen-year-old South African, and Sam, the Black man employed at Harold's mother's restaurant, makes them reevaluate their friendship.

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Format: Taschenbuch
Words and the imagination of the reader are quintessentials of modern drama. Never since Shakespeare do you find such fine and eloquent use of words and language as in Athol Fugard's "Master Harold and the boys." Speech is powerful and has never more been so than in this play
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Von Ein Kunde am 30. Oktober 1998
Format: Taschenbuch
This story is the best way to find out how 60 pages can well up a flood of emotion.
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Format: Taschenbuch
This book was originaly played with actor Danny Glover in it it. Like that is like realy cool. Like is it not
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Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.3 von 5 Sternen 46 Rezensionen
21 von 22 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Life: "None of us knows the steps, and no music's playing" 16. Dezember 2004
Von Mary Whipple - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
Set in Port Elizabeth, South Africa, in 1950, this powerful three-character play considers the interwoven relationships of young Harold (Hally), the seventeen-year-old son of the white proprietor of a tea room, and two of the African men who have worked there for years. Hally, unable to depend on his alcoholic father, now living in an institution, has always depended on Sam, the waiter, for guidance and knowledge about the real world. They share a long history in which Sam has been very much a father substitute for Hally, who has always shown him respect.

Willie, the custodian, who also looks to Sam for guidance, plans to participate, along with Sam, in a ballroom dancing competition in two weeks. For them, dancing "is beautiful because that is what we want life [in South Africa] to be like." In real life, however, "none of us knows the steps...we're bumping into each other all the time." As the play progresses, the three men reminisce, talk about their ideas of what constitutes a great hero, and show their easy relationship with each other.

A phone call announcing that Hally's father is being released from the hospital upsets the equilibrium, however. Hally, morose and worried about the future, fears that his father will once again destroy his world. Taking out his anger on Sam and Willie, he tears at their dreams regarding the dancing contest, mocking their goals and becoming cynical about what the contest means to them. As his frustration grows, Hally hurts them as he has been hurt by his father, demanding ultimately that both men call him "Master Harold."

Based on an incident in the life of the playwright, who was strongly opposed to the policies of apartheid which began in South Africa around 1948, this powerful and poignant drama casts Sam, a black man, as a person of vision and nobility. Hally, a young white man, chooses to exert power, instead of being human, and shows that he is a lesser man than either Sam or Willie. Less a political drama than a human one, the play rises above its immediate setting to consider universal feelings and human relationships. Mary Whipple
11 von 12 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen South African litterate beauty 26. Juni 1997
Von Ein Kunde - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
Words and the imagination of the reader are quintessentials of modern drama. Never since Shakespeare do you find such fine and eloquent use of words and language as in Athol Fugard's "Master Harold and the boys." Speech is powerful and has never more been so than in this play
3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A Masterful Play 16. August 2009
Von Valerie J. Saturen - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
Set in 1950s South Africa, this short one-act play packs a lot of power. The play starts fairly slowly, building the scene and allowing the reader to get to know its three characters: the teenage Hally, who's white, and Sam and Willie, the two black men who work in Hally's mother's restaurant. Willie is a less developed character than the other two; he is a simple man who is thick-headed and abusive toward his girlfriend. More central to the play is the complex relationship between Hally and Sam, who are in a sense opposites--Hally is well-educated but arrogant, while Sam lacks formal education but is humble and wise. Sam has been a lifelong fixture in Hally's life, essentially raising Hally while his father spent his days drinking. Beneath their dynamic relationship is an undercurrent of racial tension, which builds to a powerful climax at the play's end.

Much of the play's effectiveness owes to its portrayal of the subtleties of racism. It is clear that Hally views himself as an enlightened person; he espouses lofty ideals, tutors Sam in geography, and prides himself on the taboo friendship he had with the two black men as a child. When Sam finally gets him to take an interest in his passion of ballroom dancing, Hally seems to congratulate himself for finding some value in what he calls "the release of primitive emotions through movement" in a "primitive black society." Yet in his smugness, Hally is oblivious to what's really going on. For all his talk of the need for "progress," he is unwilling to take personal responsibility for it, resigning himself instead to waiting for the next great social reformer to come along. He is condescending toward Sam and fails to realize he has anything to learn from the older man. However, the young man's ignorance comes through most poignantly when the two recall an incident during Hally's childhood where Sam took him to fly a homemade kite. We learn later that because of Hally's obliviousness toward Sam--and toward the sting of racism--his recollection of the event is missing a painful, essential truth that changes the story completely.

MASTER HAROLD does leave the reader with a glimmer of hope, embodied by the dignity and compassion Sam maintains even when abandoning these virtues would be more than understandable. But the play also shows how formidable are the psychological obstacles standing in the way of change, and the degree to which racism causes suffering on both sides. Once the truly ugly side of Hally's view of Sam comes out, he becomes committed to it. Further, it's not just between Sam and Hally--Hally is burdened by the failings of the previous generation, and beneath his arrogance is a deep shame about his crippled, pitiful alcoholic father. In the end, one cannot help but feel for Hally, because of the damage his racism has done to the most important relationship he has.

The dialogue in MASTER HAROLD is very real, yet it's also fraught with layers of meaning. That this play imbues a single sixty-page scene with so much significance, complexity, and wrenching emotion is a real testament to Fugard's masterful writing.
3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Ballroom Dancing and Life 1. September 2012
Von Book Dork - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
I really enjoyed this short play- there's so much packed into so little. Keep in mind this was a text taught to my students, so I'm definitely reviewing it from the perspective of an English teacher:

Positives:
- Themes aplenty- race, father figures, intellect, age, art...
- And the symbolism- kites, ballroom dancing, comic books...
- Characters- so well-developed for a play that spans the course of just one afternoon
- The dialogue is so rich and powerful- the climax of the play is incredibly moving and insanely well-written
- Much can be done with historical and social context

Definitely a good read- would be a great airplane read- short, but deep (unless you're sitting next to a noisy child or a loud snorer).
2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen The best play I've read 24. September 2005
Von hi - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
I just finished reading this play for school and really enjoyed it. I was usually used to reading Shakespeare plays which really didn't interest me whatsoever. Then, there are those new plays that also seem to always fall short of fun reads. Well, this short play with only 3 characters actually really interested me. It was sad, tragic, funny, and very interesting. It takes place in the 50s in South Africa where racism is everly strong. In this play, there are 2 black, middle aged men, and one teenage white boy. The black men work for the boy's parents in their company and right now the boy is there alone with them as his father is in the hospital and his mother is there caring for him. At first, the 3 men seem to get along but quickly enough, racism explodes onto the pages. You see this little white boy screaming at middle aged men, treating them like dogs, taking out his aggression on them...why?...because he can. Becauseracism is everywhere and you can do whatever you want to do them.

The play shows this white boy, for no apparent reason, turning from gentle and calm to angry and frustrated.

Note how the crippled father shows how his point of view is crippled, showing how racist he is.

Athol Fugard is a very talented writer and makes this short 1hour by yourself or 2hour oral reading in class a remarquable one.

All plays should be as provoative as this one but sadly they aren't, and I strongly recommend buying this little gem, as light as a feather, that you'll be rereading a lot.
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