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The Marriage Plot von [Eugenides, Jeffrey]
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Praise for "The Marriage Plot"

"Eugenides's first novel since 2002's Pulitzer Prize-winning "Middlesex" so impressively, ambitiously breaks the mold of its predecessor that it calls for the founding of a new prize to recognize its success both as a novel--and as a Jeffrey Eugenides novel. Importantly but unobtrusively set in the early 1980s, this is the tale of Madeleine Hanna, recent Brown University English grad, and her admirer Mitchell Grammaticus, who opts out of Divinity School to walk the earth as an ersatz pilgrim. Madeleine is equally caught up, both with the postmodern vogue (Derrida, Barthes)--conflicting with her love of James, Austen, and Salinger--and with the brilliant Leonard Bankhead, whom she met in semiotics class and whose fits of manic depression jeopardize his suitability as a marriage prospect. Meanwhile, Mitchell winds up in Calcutta working with Mother Theresa's volunteers, still dreaming of Madeleine. In capturing the heady spirit of youthful intellect o

Praise for "The Marriage Plot"

"Wry, engaging and beautifully constructed." --William Deresiewicz, "The New York Times Book Review"

"["The Marriage Plot"] is sly, fun entertainment, a confection for English majors and book lovers . . .""Mr. Eugenides brings the period into bright detail--the brands of beer, the music, the affectations--and his send-ups of the pretensions of chic undergraduate subcultures are hilarious and charmingly rendered . . . [His] most mature and accomplished book so far" --Sam Sacks, "Wall Street Journal"

"No one's more adept at channeling teenage angst than Jeffrey Eugenides. Not even J. D. Salinger . . . It's in mapping Mitchell's search for some sort of belief that might fill the spiritual hole in his heart and Madeleine's search for a way to turn her passion for literature into a vocation that this novel is at its most affecting, reminding us with uncommon understanding what it is to be young and idealistic, in pursuit of true love and in love with books and ideas." --Michiko Kakutani, "The New York Times"

"This is a story about being young and bright and lost, a story Americans have been telling since Hemingway's "The Sun Also Rises." Our exceptionally well-read but largely untested graduates still wonder: How should I live my life? What can I really believe in? Whom should I love? Literature has provided a wide range of answers to those questions--Lose Lady Brett! Give up on Daisy! Go with Team Edward!--but in the end, novels aren't really very good guidebooks. Instead, they're a chance to exercise our moral imagination, and this one provides an exceptionally witty and poignant workout." --Ron Charles, "The Washington Post"

"If there is a writer to whom Eugenides appears connected, it is not Wallace but Jonathan Franzen. They are less than a year apart in age, and while Franzen got a head start, the two, who are both with the same publisher, are on similar publishing schedules. Last year, Franzen's "Freedom" was a bestseller; like "The Marriage Plot," it's a robust, rich story of adults in a love triangle. Eugenides benefits by the comparison: This book is sweeter, kinder, with a more generous heart. What's more, it is layered with exactly the kinds of things that people who love novels will love." --Carolyn Kellogg, "Los Angeles Times"

"Eugenides steers effortlessly through the intertwining tales of his three protagonists, shifting seamlessly among their three viewpoints and overlapping their stories in a way that's easy to follow and never labored. His prose is smooth but never flashy, and his eye for the telling detail or gesture is keen. Slowly but confidently he fleshes out his characters, and as they slowly accrue weight and realism, readers will feel increasingly opinionated about the choices they make . . . It's heavy stuff, but Eugenides distinguishes himself from too many novelists who seem to think a somber tone equates to a serious purpose. "The Marriage Plot" is fun to read and ultimately affirming." --Patrick Condon, "San Francisco Chronicle"

"Eugenides, a master storyteller, has a remarkable way of twisting his narrative in a way that seems effortless; taking us backward and forward in time to fill in details . . . For these characters, who don't live in Jane Austen's world, no simple resolution will do for them in the world. And yet you close this book with immense satisfaction--falling in love just a bit yourself, with a new kind of marriage plot." --Moira Macdonald, "Seattle Times"

"Jeffrey Eugenides, in his glorious new novel, mines our thrall and eternal unease around sex, love and marriage . . . At its core, "The Marriage Plot" is besotted with books, flush with literary references. It seems coyly designed to become the volume all former English majors take to their breasts." --Karen Long, "The Plain Dealer"

"There has been a storybook quality to much American fiction recently--larger-than-life, hyper-exuberant, gaudy like the superhero comics and fairy tales that have inspired it. By sticking to ordinary human truth, Eugenides has bucked this trend and written his most powerful book yet." --Zachary Lazar, "Newsday"

"Befitting [Eugenides's] status as that rare author who bridges both highbrow book clubs and best-seller lists, his third novel is a grand romance in the Austen tradition--one that also deconstructs the very idea of why we'd still find pleasure in such a timeworn narrative style. It's a book that asks why we love to read, yet is so relentlessly charming, smart and funny that it answers its own question." --David Daley, "USA TODAY"

"There are serious pleasures here for people who love to read." --Leah Greenblatt, "Entertainment Weekly"

"Eugenides's first novel since 2002's Pulitzer Prize-winning "Middlesex" so impressively, ambitiously breaks the mold of its predecessor that it calls for the founding of a new prize to recognize its success both as a novel--and as a Jeffrey Eugenides novel. Importantly but unobtrusively set in the early 1980s, this is the tale of Madeleine Hanna, recent Brown University English grad, and her admirer Mitchell Grammaticus, who opts out of Divinity School to walk the earth as an ersatz pilgrim. Madeleine is equally caught up, both with the postmodern vogue (Derrida, Barthes)--conflicting with her love of James, Austen, and Salinger--and with the brilliant Leonard Bankhead, whom she met in semiotics class and whose fits of manic depression jeopardize his suitability as a marriage prospect. Meanwhile, Mitchell winds up in Calcutta working with Mother Theresa's volunteers, still dreaming of Madeleine. In capturing the heady spirit of youthful intellect on the verge, Eugenides revives the coming-of-age novel for a new generation The book's fidelity to its young heroes and to a superb supporting cast of enigmatic professors, feminist theorists, neo-Victorians, and concerned mothers, and all of their evolving investment in ideas and ideals is such that the central argument of the book is also its solution: the old stories may be best after all, but there are always new ways to complicate them." --"Publisher's Weekly" (starred review)

""

""

"In Eugenides' first novel since the Pulitzer Prize-winning "Middlesex" (2002), English major and devotee of classic literature Madeleine Hanna is a senior at Reagan-era Brown University. Only when curiosity gets the best of her does she belly up to Semiotics 211, a bastion of postmodern liberalism, and meet handsome, brilliant, mysterious Leonard Bankhead. Completing a triangle is Madeleine's friend Mitchell, a clear-eyed religious-studies student who believes himself her true intended. Eugenides' drama unfolds over the next year or so. His characteristically deliberate, researched realization of place and personality serve him well, and he strikes perfectly tuned chords by referring to works ranging from Barthes' "Lovers' Discourse" to Bemelmans' "Madeline" books for children. The remarkably a propos title refers to the subject of Madeleine's honors thesis, which is the Western novel's doing and undoing, in that, upon the demise, circa 1900, of the marriage plot, the novel 'didn't mean much anymore, ' according to Madeleine's professor and, perhaps, Eugenides. With this tightly, immaculately self-contained tale set upon pillars at once imposing and of dollhouse scale, namely, academia ('College wasn't like the real world, ' Madeleine notes) and the emotions of the youngest of twentysomethings, Eugenides realizes the novel whose dismantling his characters examine." "--"Annie Bostrom, "Booklist" (starred review)

"A stunning novel--erudite, compassionate and penetrating in its analysis of love relationships. Eugenides focuses primarily on three characters, who all graduate from Brown in 1982. One of the pieces of this triangle is Madeleine Hanna, who finds herself somewhat embarrassed to have emerged from a "normal" household in New Jersey (though we later find out the normality of her upbringing is only relative). She becomes enamored with Leonard, a brilliant but moody student, in their Semiotics course, one of the texts being, ironically, Roland Barthes' "A Lover's Discourse," which Madeleine finds disturbingly problematic in helping her figure out her own love relationship. We discover that Leonard had been diagnosed with bipolar disorder during his first year at Brown, and his struggle with mood swings throughout the novel is both titanic and tender. The third major player is Mitchell, a Religious Studies major who is also attracted to Madeleine but whose reticence she finds both disturbing and incomprehensible. On graduation day, Leonard has a breakdown and is hospitalized in a mental-health ward, and Madeleine shows her commitment by skipping the festivities and seeking him out. After graduation, Leonard and Madeleine live together when Leonard gets an internship at a biology lab on Cape Cod, and the spring after graduation they marry, when Leonard is able to get his mood swings under temporary control. Meanwhile Mitchell, who takes his major seriously, travels to India seeking a path--and briefly finds one when he volunteers to work with the dying in Calcutta. But Mitchell's road to self-discovery eventually returns him to the States--and opens another opportunity for love that complicates Madeleine's life. Dazzling work--Eugenides continues to show that he is one of the finest of contemporary novelists." --"Kirkus" (starred review)

"'The way of true love never works out, except at the end of an English novel.' So says Trollope in Barchester Towers, one of those English novels where 'the marriage plot' thrived until it was swept aside by 20th-century reality. Now Roland Barthes's contention that 'the lover's discourse is today of an extreme solitude' better sums up the situation. Or so English literature-besotted Madeleine, 1980s Brown graduating senior, comes to discover. Giving in to the zeitgeist, Madeleine takes a course on semiotics and meets Leonard, who's brilliant, charismatic, and unstable. They've broken up, which makes moody spiritual seeker Mitchell Grammaticus happy, since he pines for Madeleine. But on graduation day, Madeleine discovers that Leonard is in the hospital--in fact, he is a manic depressive with an on-again, off-again relationship with his medications--and leaps to his side. So begins the story of their love (but does it work out?), as Mitchell heads to Europe and beyond for his own epiphanies. VERDICT Your standard love triangle? Absolutely not. This extraordinary, liquidly written evocation of love's mad rush and inevitable failures will feed your mind as you rapidly turn the pages. Highly recommended." --Barbara Hoffert, "Library Journal" (starred review)

Wry, engaging and beautifully constructed. "William Deresiewicz, The New York Times Book Review"

["The Marriage Plot"] is sly, fun entertainment, a confection for English majors and book lovers . . . Mr. Eugenides brings the period into bright detail--the brands of beer, the music, the affectations--and his send-ups of the pretensions of chic undergraduate subcultures are hilarious and charmingly rendered . . . [His] most mature and accomplished book so far "Sam Sacks, Wall Street Journal"

No one's more adept at channeling teenage angst than Jeffrey Eugenides. Not even J. D. Salinger . . . It's in mapping Mitchell's search for some sort of belief that might fill the spiritual hole in his heart and Madeleine's search for a way to turn her passion for literature into a vocation that this novel is at its most affecting, reminding us with uncommon understanding what it is to be young and idealistic, in pursuit of true love and in love with books and ideas. "Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times"

This is a story about being young and bright and lost, a story Americans have been telling since Hemingway's "The Sun Also Rises." Our exceptionally well-read but largely untested graduates still wonder: How should I live my life? What can I really believe in? Whom should I love? Literature has provided a wide range of answers to those questions--Lose Lady Brett! Give up on Daisy! Go with Team Edward!--but in the end, novels aren't really very good guidebooks. Instead, they're a chance to exercise our moral imagination, and this one provides an exceptionally witty and poignant workout. "Ron Charles, The Washington Post"

If there is a writer to whom Eugenides appears connected, it is not Wallace but Jonathan Franzen. They are less than a year apart in age, and while Franzen got a head start, the two, who are both with the same publisher, are on similar publishing schedules. Last year, Franzen's "Freedom" was a bestseller; like "The Marriage Plot," it's a robust, rich story of adults in a love triangle. Eugenides benefits by the comparison: This book is sweeter, kinder, with a more generous heart. What's more, it is layered with exactly the kinds of things that people who love novels will love. "Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times"

Eugenides steers effortlessly through the intertwining tales of his three protagonists, shifting seamlessly among their three viewpoints and overlapping their stories in a way that's easy to follow and never labored. His prose is smooth but never flashy, and his eye for the telling detail or gesture is keen. Slowly but confidently he fleshes out his characters, and as they slowly accrue weight and realism, readers will feel increasingly opinionated about the choices they make . . . It's heavy stuff, but Eugenides distinguishes himself from too many novelists who seem to think a somber tone equates to a serious purpose. "The Marriage Plot" is fun to read and ultimately affirming. "Patrick Condon, San Francisco Chronicle"

Eugenides, a master storyteller, has a remarkable way of twisting his narrative in a way that seems effortless; taking us backward and forward in time to fill in details . . . For these characters, who don't live in Jane Austen's world, no simple resolution will do for them in the world. And yet you close this book with immense satisfaction--falling in love just a bit yourself, with a new kind of marriage plot. "Moira Macdonald, Seattle Times"

Jeffrey Eugenides, in his glorious new novel, mines our thrall and eternal unease around sex, love and marriage . . . At its core, "The Marriage Plot" is besotted with books, flush with literary references. It seems coyly designed to become the volume all former English majors take to their breasts. "Karen Long, The Plain Dealer"

There has been a storybook quality to much American fiction recently--larger-than-life, hyper-exuberant, gaudy like the superhero comics and fairy tales that have inspired it. By sticking to ordinary human truth, Eugenides has bucked this trend and written his most powerful book yet. "Zachary Lazar, Newsday"

Befitting [Eugenides's] status as that rare author who bridges both highbrow book clubs and best-seller lists, his third novel is a grand romance in the Austen tradition--one that also deconstructs the very idea of why we'd still find pleasure in such a timeworn narrative style. It's a book that asks why we love to read, yet is so relentlessly charming, smart and funny that it answers its own question. "David Daley, USA TODAY"

There are serious pleasures here for people who love to read. "Leah Greenblatt, Entertainment Weekly"

Eugenides's first novel since 2002's Pulitzer Prize winning "Middlesex" so impressively, ambitiously breaks the mold of its predecessor that it calls for the founding of a new prize to recognize its success both as a novel--and as a Jeffrey Eugenides novel. Importantly but unobtrusively set in the early 1980s, this is the tale of Madeleine Hanna, recent Brown University English grad, and her admirer Mitchell Grammaticus, who opts out of Divinity School to walk the earth as an ersatz pilgrim. Madeleine is equally caught up, both with the postmodern vogue (Derrida, Barthes)--conflicting with her love of James, Austen, and Salinger--and with the brilliant Leonard Bankhead, whom she met in semiotics class and whose fits of manic depression jeopardize his suitability as a marriage prospect. Meanwhile, Mitchell winds up in Calcutta working with Mother Theresa's volunteers, still dreaming of Madeleine. In capturing the heady spirit of youthful intellect on the verge, Eugenides revives the coming-of-age novel for a new generation The book's fidelity to its young heroes and to a superb supporting cast of enigmatic professors, feminist theorists, neo-Victorians, and concerned mothers, and all of their evolving investment in ideas and ideals is such that the central argument of the book is also its solution: the old stories may be best after all, but there are always new ways to complicate them. "Publisher's Weekly (starred review)"

In Eugenides' first novel since the Pulitzer Prize winning "Middlesex" (2002), English major and devotee of classic literature Madeleine Hanna is a senior at Reagan-era Brown University. Only when curiosity gets the best of her does she belly up to Semiotics 211, a bastion of postmodern liberalism, and meet handsome, brilliant, mysterious Leonard Bankhead. Completing a triangle is Madeleine's friend Mitchell, a clear-eyed religious-studies student who believes himself her true intended. Eugenides' drama unfolds over the next year or so. His characteristically deliberate, researched realization of place and personality serve him well, and he strikes perfectly tuned chords by referring to works ranging from Barthes' "Lovers' Discourse" to Bemelmans' "Madeline" books for children. The remarkably a propos title refers to the subject of Madeleine's honors thesis, which is the Western novel's doing and undoing, in that, upon the demise, circa 1900, of the marriage plot, the novel didn't mean much anymore, ' according to Madeleine's professor and, perhaps, Eugenides. With this tightly, immaculately self-contained tale set upon pillars at once imposing and of dollhouse scale, namely, academia ( College wasn't like the real world, ' Madeleine notes) and the emotions of the youngest of twentysomethings, Eugenides realizes the novel whose dismantling his characters examine. "Annie Bostrom, Booklist (starred review)"

A stunning novel--erudite, compassionate and penetrating in its analysis of love relationships. Eugenides focuses primarily on three characters, who all graduate from Brown in 1982. One of the pieces of this triangle is Madeleine Hanna, who finds herself somewhat embarrassed to have emerged from a "normal" household in New Jersey (though we later find out the normality of her upbringing is only relative). She becomes enamored with Leonard, a brilliant but moody student, in their Semiotics course, one of the texts being, ironically, Roland Barthes' "A Lover's Discourse," which Madeleine finds disturbingly problematic in helping her figure out her own love relationship. We discover that Leonard had been diagnosed with bipolar disorder during his first year at Brown, and his struggle with mood swings throughout the novel is both titanic and tender. The third major player is Mitchell, a Religious Studies major who is also attracted to Madeleine but whose reticence she finds both disturbing and incomprehensible. On graduation day, Leonard has a breakdown and is hospitalized in a mental-health ward, and Madeleine shows her commitment by skipping the festivities and seeking him out. After graduation, Leonard and Madeleine live together when Leonard gets an internship at a biology lab on Cape Cod, and the spring after graduation they marry, when Leonard is able to get his mood swings under temporary control. Meanwhile Mitchell, who takes his major seriously, travels to India seeking a path--and briefly finds one when he volunteers to work with the dying in Calcutta. But Mitchell's road to self-discovery eventually returns him to the States--and opens another opportunity for love that complicates Madeleine's life. Dazzling work--Eugenides continues to show that he is one of the finest of contemporary novelists. "Kirkus (starred review)"

The way of true love never works out, except at the end of an English novel.' So says Trollope in Barchester Towers, one of those English novels where the marriage plot' thrived until it was swept aside by 20th-century reality. Now Roland Barthes's contention that the lover's discourse is today of an extreme solitude' better sums up the situation. Or so English literature besotted Madeleine, 1980s Brown graduating senior, comes to discover. Giving in to the zeitgeist, Madeleine takes a course on semiotics and meets Leonard, who's brilliant, charismatic, and unstable. They've broken up, which makes moody spiritual seeker Mitchell Grammaticus happy, since he pines for Madeleine. But on graduation day, Madeleine discovers that Leonard is in the hospital--in fact, he is a manic depressive with an on-again, off-again relationship with his medications--and leaps to his side. So begins the story of their love (but does it work out?), as Mitchell heads to Europe and beyond for his own epiphanies. VERDICT Your standard love triangle? Absolutely not. This extraordinary, liquidly written evocation of love's mad rush and inevitable failures will feed your mind as you rapidly turn the pages. Highly recommended. "Barbara Hoffert, Library Journal (starred review)""

Pressestimmen

"The sound of silk drawn across fine-grain sandpaper best describes David Pittu’s voice in THE MARRIAGE PLOT, by Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Jeffrey Eugenides...The talented Pittu rises to the occasion of this challenging work, rewarding the listener with a sense of satisfaction reserved for great works of literature." —AudioFile magazine, An Earphones Award Winner 

“David Pittu brilliantly narrates this audio version of Eugenides’ complex novel, whether he’s rattling off quotes from Jacques Derrida and Roland Barthes or creating unique voices for the book’s many characters. Among the standouts are his renditions of the slow and reflective Mitchell and Thurston, the star of the semiotics seminar who speaks in a falsely laconic and disinterested fashion to impress his classmates and professor… [Pittu] never runs out of voices for this large, global cast. The result is one of the best audiobooks of the year.” – Publishers Weekly, starred review

“Make someone’s holiday travels a little more enjoyable with the audio version of Jeffrey Eugenides’ latest work, The Marriage Plot, a novel about 1980’s college grads caught in a love triangle.” – Entertainment Weekly, Gift Guide

“Pittu lends a calm – and slightly world-weary – air to this story of a romantic triangle among classic literature devotees.” – The Los Angeles Times

“David Pittu did an excellent job reading the book, and I couldn’t stop listening…If you want a highly charged discussion in your book club, pick this one.” – The Record-Courier

“Theater actor David Pittu brings Eugenides’ tale to life – you may feel like you’re back in your favorite college-lit seminar” – Entertainment Weekly

“[Eugenides] gives us a truly contemporary look at the vagaries of love and the need to find yourself before you can find your mate…Narrator David Pittu does a fine job delineating each character.” – BookPage

“The performance of the unabridged audiobook by David Pittu is full of energy; Pittu keeps the characters distinct and is able to deliver even the passages that are theory-heavy with enthusiasm.” – Metapsychology Online Reviews

Praise for print edition of The Marriage Plot:
 
“Wry, engaging and beautifully constructed.” —William Deresiewicz, The New York Times Book Review

 

“[The Marriage Plot] is sly, fun entertainment, a confection for English majors and book lovers . . . Mr. Eugenides brings the period into bright detail—the brands of beer, the music, the affectations—and his send-ups of the pretensions of chic undergraduate subcultures are hilarious and charmingly rendered . . . [His] most mature and accomplished book so far” —Sam Sacks, Wall Street Journal

 

“No one’s more adept at channeling teenage angst than Jeffrey Eugenides. Not even J. D. Salinger . . . It’s in mapping Mitchell’s search for some sort of belief that might fill the spiritual hole in his heart and Madeleine’s search for a way to turn her passion for literature into a vocation that this novel is at its most affecting, reminding us with uncommon understanding what it is to be young and idealistic, in pursuit of true love and in love with books and ideas.” —Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times

 

“This is a story about being young and bright and lost, a story Americans have been telling since Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises. Our exceptionally well-read but largely untested graduates still wonder: How should I live my life? What can I really believe in? Whom should I love? Literature has provided a wide range of answers to those questions—Lose Lady Brett! Give up on Daisy! Go with Team Edward!—but in the end, novels aren’t really very good guidebooks. Instead, they’re a chance to exercise our moral imagination, and this one provides an exceptionally witty and poignant workout.” —Ron Charles, The Washington Post

 

“If there is a writer to whom Eugenides appears connected, it is not Wallace but Jonathan Franzen. They are less than a year apart in age, and while Franzen got a head start, the two, who are both with the same publisher, are on similar publishing schedules. Last year, Franzen's Freedom was a bestseller; like The Marriage Plot, it's a robust, rich story of adults in a love triangle. Eugenides benefits by the comparison: This book is sweeter, kinder, with a more generous heart. What's more, it is layered with exactly the kinds of things that people who love novels will love.” —Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times

 

“Eugenides steers effortlessly through the intertwining tales of his three protagonists, shifting seamlessly among their three viewpoints and overlapping their stories in a way that's easy to follow and never labored. His prose is smooth but never flashy, and his eye for the telling detail or gesture is keen. Slowly but confidently he fleshes out his characters, and as they slowly accrue weight and realism, readers will feel increasingly opinionated about the choices they make . . . It's heavy stuff, but Eugenides distinguishes himself from too many novelists who seem to think a somber tone equates to a serious purpose. The Marriage Plot is fun to read and ultimately affirming.” —Patrick Condon, San Francisco Chronicle

 

“Eugenides, a master storyteller, has a remarkable way of twisting his narrative in a way that seems effortless; taking us backward and forward in time to fill in details . . . For these characters, who don't live in Jane Austen's world, no simple resolution will do for them in the world. And yet you close this book with immense satisfaction—falling in love just a bit yourself, with a new kind of marriage plot.” —Moira Macdonald, Seattle Times

 

“Jeffrey Eugenides, in his glorious new novel, mines our thrall and eternal unease around sex, love and marriage . . . At its core, The Marriage Plot is besotted with books, flush with literary references. It seems coyly designed to become the volume all former English majors take to their breasts.” —Karen Long, The Plain Dealer

 

“There has been a storybook quality to much American fiction recently—larger-than-life, hyper-exuberant, gaudy like the superhero comics and fairy tales that have inspired it. By sticking to ordinary human truth, Eugenides has bucked this trend and written his most powerful book yet.” —Zachary Lazar, Newsday

 

“Befitting [Eugenides’s] status as that rare author who bridges both highbrow book clubs and best-seller lists, his third novel is a grand romance in the Austen tradition—one that also deconstructs the very idea of why we'd still find pleasure in such a timeworn narrative style. It's a book that asks why we love to read, yet is so relentlessly charming, smart and funny that it answers its own question.” —David Daley, USA TODAY

 

“There are serious pleasures here for people who love to read.” —Leah Greenblatt, Entertainment Weekly

“Eugenides's first novel since 2002's Pulitzer Prize–winning Middlesex so impressively, ambitiously breaks the mold of its predecessor that it calls for the founding of a new prize to recognize its success both as a novel—and as a Jeffrey Eugenides novel. Importantly but unobtrusively set in the early 1980s, this is the tale of Madeleine Hanna, recent Brown University English grad, and her admirer Mitchell Grammaticus, who opts out of Divinity School to walk the earth as an ersatz pilgrim. Madeleine is equally caught up, both with the postmodern vogue (Derrida, Barthes)—conflicting with her love of James, Austen, and Salinger—and with the brilliant Leonard Bankhead, whom she met in semiotics class and whose fits of manic depression jeopardize his suitability as a marriage prospect. Meanwhile, Mitchell winds up in Calcutta working with Mother Theresa's volunteers, still dreaming of Madeleine. In capturing the heady spirit of youthful intellect on the verge, Eugenides revives the coming-of-age novel for a new generation The book's fidelity to its young heroes and to a superb supporting cast of enigmatic professors, feminist theorists, neo-Victorians, and concerned mothers, and all of their evolving investment in ideas and ideals is such that the central argument of the book is also its solution: the old stories may be best after all, but there are always new ways to complicate them.” —Publisher’s Weekly (starred review)

“In Eugenides’ first novel since the Pulitzer Prize–winning Middlesex (2002), English major and devotee of classic literature Madeleine Hanna is a senior at Reagan-era Brown University. Only when curiosity gets the best of her does she belly up to Semiotics 211, a bastion of postmodern liberalism, and meet handsome, brilliant, mysterious Leonard Bankhead. Completing a triangle is Madeleine’s friend Mitchell, a clear-eyed religious-studies student who believes himself her true intended. Eugenides’ drama unfolds over the next year or so. His characteristically deliberate, researched realization of place and personality serve him well, and he strikes perfectly tuned chords by referring to works ranging from Barthes’ Lovers’ Discourse to Bemelmans’ Madeline books fo...


Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 1524 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 417 Seiten
  • Verlag: Fourth Estate (3. Oktober 2011)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B005E88OKG
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Aktiviert
  • Verbesserter Schriftsatz: Aktiviert
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 3.5 von 5 Sternen 11 Kundenrezensionen
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: #21.458 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop (Siehe Top 100 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop)

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Die klassische "Liebeshandlung" wie in den von Madeline so heiß geliebten englischen Romanen des 19. Jahrhunderts, scheint es in der heutigen Literatur, ja im heutigen Leben, nicht mehr zu geben. Was tut Eugenides? Er erzählt genau das, die Geschichte der jungen Literaturstudentin Madeline, die - ganz verkürzt ausgedrückt- zwischen zwei Verehrern, Mitchell und Leonard, zu wählen hat. Schauplatz ist ein mittelprächtiges amerikanisches College in den 1980er Jahren. Madeline wirkt zunächst recht oberflächlich, untentschlossen, verwöhnt und naiv, wird aber im Verlauf des Romans unter dem Eindruck ihres Studiums, den Irrläufen der Gefühle, feministischem Zeitgeist und der Lektüre französischer Dekonstruktivisten noch reifen. Mitchell ist ein eher unauffälliger Typ, jedoch offenbar ziemlich begabt, sensibel, und spirituell auf der Suche. Leonard kommt aus einem schwierigen Elternhaus und ist psychisch krank, fasziniert aber als "womanizer" und brillianter Unterhalter, mit klugen, oft auch altklugen Gedanken sein Umfeld. Das ist die gegebene Konstellation. Von hier aus entwickelt Eugenides seine Charaktere, manövriert sie durch wichtige Jahre, in die er sich offenbar besonders gut hineinversetzen kann (wie schon bei "Middlesex"): Jahre, in denen man die Macht und Faszination des Wissens entdeckt, sich aus dem schulischen Wissenskanon emanzipiert und seine eigenen Interessensgebiete erforscht. Jahre der Selbstfindung, der gesunden kritischen Distanzierung vom Elternhaus, der sexuellen Identitätsfindung, der Suche nach dem Lebenssinn usw. Am Ende dieser jugendlichen Selbsterforschung steht Madelines Entscheidung - welche, wird hier natürlich nicht verraten.Lesen Sie weiter... ›
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tolle Story, toll geschrieben!!! Auf Englisch schon recht anspruchsvoll, nichts für Anfänger.

Entgegen der romantischen Vorstellung von Madeleine verläuft ihre Liebesgeschichte ganz anders als in den von ihr so geliebten Romanen des 19. Jahrunderts. Sie verliebt sich zwar in Leonard, die beiden kommen auch zusammen, haben aber eine schwierige Beziehung, da er psychisch krank ist. Die Krankheit bestimmt ihren Alltag und verhindert, dass die beiden eine ganz normal junge Liebe leben können.

Jeffrey Eugenides beschreibt die Höhen und Tiefen einer Depression sehr authentisch und eindrucksvoll. Man leidet als Leser mit Madeleine.

Einen Stern Abzug gibt es allerdings für die sehr unhandliche Größe des Buches...
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Von Michael Collin TOP 1000 REZENSENT am 3. Oktober 2012
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Mein erster Eugenides-Roman. Die beiden früheren wurden im Lesekreis vorgestellt und kamen mir damals etwas zu reißerisch daher, habe sie darum nicht gelesen. Bei der Lektüre dieses Romans habe ich wie so oft festgestellt, dass ich mich von Vorurteilen leiten lasse. The Marriage Plot hat mir sehr gut gefallen, es ist ein sehr engagiert konstruierter intellektueller Roman, der sich zwischen den Polen des klassischen viktorianischen Liebesromans und des Dekonstruktivismus (Roland Barthes Fragmente einer Sprache der Liebe) bewegt. Mich hat auch sehr die detailgenaue Darstellung von Leonard Bankhead interessiert, der manisch-depressiv ist und sich mit einem Leben als psychisch Kranker auseinandersetzen muß. Einige Beobachtungen und Formulierungen sind so treffgenau, dass ich mir kaum vorstellen konnte, dass sich Eugenides das Wissen um diese Krankheit "nur" angelesen hat.
Auch die Autorenlesung in Hamburg hat mich beeindruckt. Im gescheiten Plauderton sprach Eugenides über sein Buch und die Protagonisten.
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"One of the nice things about being twenty-two, or about being Madeleine Hanna, was that three weeks of romantic anguish, followed by a night of epic drinking, didn't do much visible damage" (8f.). Hoffnungslos romantisch, fasziniert von dem ewigen Auf und Ab in den Romanen Austens, der Brontes, Elliots oder Dickens; das ist die Literaturstudentin Madeleine Hanna, die sich zu Beginn der achtziger Jahre ihrem eigenen "Marriage Plot" ausgesetzt sieht. Auf der einen Seite der genialisch veranlagte, manisch depressive Leonard Bankhead, auf der anderen Seite der sinnsuchende Student der Religionen Mitchell Grammaticus (!!), der in Madeleine die Perfektion des Weiblichen an sich verkörpert sieht. Diese Dreierkonstellation bildet die Grundlage von Jeffrey Eugenides lange erwarteten neuen Roman.

Und was auch leicht zu einer klischeeüberladenen kitschigen Verkuppelungsromanze hätte verkommen können, gerät bei Eugenides zu einem witzigen, intelligenten, anspielungsreichen und sprachlich hervorragenden page-turner, bei dem sich die deutsche Leserschaft wieder einmal fragt, warum wir eigentlich keine begnadeten Geschichtenerzähler mehr hervorbringen, sondern dieses Feld schon seit Jahrzehnten der anglo-amerikanischen Literatur überlassen. "The Marriage Plot" ist zum einen eine herrliche campus novel, die mit viel Witz und einem Hauch Nostalgie das Klima an den amerikanischen Universitäten in den achtziger Jahren, hier am Beispiel der Brown University, einfängt.
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
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