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Marking the Land: Jim Dow in North Dakota (Center for American Places - Center Books on American Places) (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 15. August 2007

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Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

" Jim Dow' s photographs of North Dakota are at the heart of a very important life' s work in photography, and these images eloquently summarize a deeply imaginative people and an astonishing landscape nearly invisible from our two coasts. "Marking the Land" is a work of grandeur and intimacy, and it is the kind of work that can truly change what we know and what we feel." -- Emmet Gowin, Princeton University







Jim Dows photographs of North Dakota are at the heart of a very important lifes work in photography, and these images eloquently summarize a deeply imaginative people and an astonishing landscape nearly invisible from our two coasts. Marking the Land is a work of grandeur and intimacy, and it is the kind of work that can truly change what we know and what we feel.Emmet Gowin, Princeton University -- Emmet Gowins (04/01/2007)

"Like Walker Evans . . . Dow captures the vitality, the humor, and the poetry of folk art and vernacular architecture. . . . A selective but deeply satisfying portrait of the Northern Plains."--Robert Silberman "Great Plains Quarterly "

"Jim Dow's photographs of North Dakota are at the heart of a very important life's work in photography, and these images eloquently summarize a deeply imaginative people and an astonishing landscape nearly invisible from our two coasts. "Marking the Land" is a work of grandeur and intimacy, and it is the kind of work that can truly change what we know and what we feel."--Emmet Gowin, Princeton University





--Emmet Gowins (04/01/2007)

Jim Dow s photographs of North Dakota are at the heart of a very important life s work in photography, and these images eloquently summarize a deeply imaginative people and an astonishing landscape nearly invisible from our two coasts. "Marking the Land" is a work of grandeur and intimacy, and it is the kind of work that can truly change what we know and what we feel.
--Emmet Gowin, Princeton University (04/01/2007)"

"There is a temptation to describe Jim Dow as a latter-day Walker Evans, even though most of Dow's work is in color. . . . But while Evans insisted to the point of arrogance that his work, despite its descriptive nature, was the highest art, Dow has no such pretension. His images are artful, to be sure, but they are less about the artist and more about the people who create the things depicted. Despite their precisionism, they are far more human than Evans's pictures. . . . The totality of Dow's new monograph, "Marking the Land: Jim Dow in North Dakota," makes it clear that the photographer's images are not judgment-free records of weathered roadside attractions. The best of them quietly critique our attitudes toward the particular landscapes we inhabit. . . . Dow's timeworn building facades have a plainness that suits the prairie's nondescript topography and camouflages the dense decor of their interiors, which are crammed full as if to nullify the starkness of North Dakota's great outdoors."--Russell Hart"American Photo" (12/17/2007)

Synopsis

The demanding frontier life of "My Antonia" or "Little House on the Prairie" may be long gone, but the idyllic small town still exists as a cherished icon of American community life. Yet sprawl and urban density, rather than small towns and farms, are the predominant features of our modern society, agribusiness and other commercial forces have rapidly taken over family farms and ranches, and even the open spaces we think of as natural retreats only retain the barest facade of their former frontier austerity. The fading communities, social upheaval, and enduring heritage of the northern plains are the subject of Jim Dow's "Marking the Land", a stirring photographic tribute to the complex and unyielding landscape of North Dakota. Jim Dow began making pilgrimages to this remote territory in 1981 and, with a commission from the North Dakota Museum of Art, he took photographs of the passing human presence on the land.

The simple, stolid pieces of architecture carved out against the Dakota skies - whether the local schoolhouse, car wash, prison, hunting lodge, a home, or a church - evoke in their spare lines and weather-battered frames the stoic and toughened spirit of the people within their walls. Folk art is also an integral part of the landscape in Dow's visual study, and he examines the subtle evolution of local craftsmanship from homemade sculptures, murals, and carvings to carefully crafted pieces aimed at tourists. Anchoring all of these explorations is the raw and striking landscape of the North Dakota plains. "Marking the Land" is a moving reflection by a leading American photographer on the state of the northern plains today, forcing us all to rethink our conceptions of America's forgotten frontier.

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Format: Taschenbuch
Jim Dow has done us all a favor with his remarkable book of photos. In the final chapter called Dreaming and Redemption he says `Those unfamiliar with North Dakota habitually say that it is cold, boring, flat, desolate and empty -- inadequate generalizations that simply don't hold up'. Just look through the 185 color photos several times and the Peace Garden State will grow on you and although none of the photos contain people you really feel their presence.

One of the strengths of the book is the editorial flow. Rather than just run page after page of photos here the work is divided into eight chapters each with a page introduction. Some are quite short like the first one: Views of North Dakota, which surprisingly is made up of twelve shots of the inside walls of the state penitentiary where bad guy Charles Olive, murderer and sign painter created a series of murals showing the North Dakota landscape. The Marking the Land chapter has thirty-seven photos of man-made signs, rusting agricultural machinery (deliberately left as a mark on the landscape) and larger than life animal statues. Artists and Workplace chapter (sixty photos) features workshops, bars, retail interiors and commercial architecture. Religious Life (twenty photos) reflects the diverse nature of grave markers and church buildings found in the State.

Although I have a paperback copy (2500 printed according to the imprint) I think it could be considered a book of coffee table proportions, well printed in an impressively fine screen and unusual for a photo book it has an index, too. I would only fault this book of photos in the way captions have been handled. Like many photo books they are at the back with a thumbnail and page number when nearly all the text would easily fit under the relevant images.

I think Jim Dow's impressive photos reveal a lot more of North Dakota than the predictable cold, boring and flat cliché.
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Amazon.com: 3.7 von 5 Sternen 3 Rezensionen
4.0 von 5 Sternen Four Stars 11. August 2014
Von Richard Clapp - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
Very good book: a survey of Jim Dow's work in North Dakota. Printing and quality is great.
8 von 9 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Northern Plains quietude 9. Oktober 2007
Von Robin - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
Jim Dow has done us all a favor with his remarkable book of photos. In the final chapter called Dreaming and Redemption he says `Those unfamiliar with North Dakota habitually say that it is cold, boring, flat, desolate and empty -- inadequate generalizations that simply don't hold up'. Just look through the 185 color photos several times and the Peace Garden State will grow on you and although none of the photos contain people you really feel their presence.

One of the strengths of the book is the editorial flow. Rather than just run page after page of photos here the work is divided into eight chapters each with a page introduction. Some are quite short like the first one: Views of North Dakota, which surprisingly is made up of twelve shots of the inside walls of the state penitentiary where bad guy Charles Olive, murderer and sign painter created a series of murals showing the North Dakota landscape. The Marking the Land chapter has thirty-seven photos of man-made signs, rusting agricultural machinery (deliberately left as a mark on the landscape) and larger than life animal statues. Artists and Workplace chapter (sixty photos) features workshops, bars, retail interiors and commercial architecture. Religious Life (twenty photos) reflects the diverse nature of grave markers and church buildings found in the State.

Although I have a paperback copy (2500 printed according to the imprint) I think it could be considered a book of coffee table proportions, well printed in an impressively fine screen and unusual for a photo book it has an index, too. I would only fault this book of photos in the way captions have been handled. Like many photo books they are at the back with a thumbnail and page number when nearly all the text would easily fit under the relevant images.

I think Jim Dow's impressive photos reveal a lot more of North Dakota than the predictable cold, boring and flat cliché.

***FOR AN INSIDE LOOK click 'customer images' under the cover.
1 von 8 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen North Dakota??????? 28. März 2008
Von James in SB - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
descent photography, I feel as though if you are going to say "Jim Dow in North Dakota" the photos should be only from ND and not the surrounding states. If you are from ND you may not like it.
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