Facebook Twitter Pinterest <Einbetten>
  • Alle Preisangaben inkl. USt
Nur noch 2 auf Lager
Verkauf und Versand durch moviemars-de. Für weitere Informationen, Impressum, AGB und Widerrufsrecht klicken Sie bitte auf den Verkäufernamen.
EUR 10,86 + EUR 3,00 für Lieferungen nach Deutschland

Lieferort:
Um Adressen zu sehen, bitte
Oder
Bitte tragen Sie eine deutsche PLZ ein.
Oder
+ EUR 3,00 Versandkosten
Gebraucht: Sehr gut | Details
Verkauft von betterworldbooks__
Zustand: Gebraucht: Sehr gut
Kommentar: Sehr guter Zustand fuer ein gebrauchtes Buch, minimale Abnutzungserscheinungen. 100%ige Kostenrueckerstattung garantiert Ueber eine Million zufriedene Kunden!
Möchten Sie verkaufen?
Zur Rückseite klappen Zur Vorderseite klappen
Hörprobe Wird gespielt... Angehalten   Sie hören eine Hörprobe des Audible Hörbuch-Downloads.
Mehr erfahren
Alle 3 Bilder anzeigen

Lost on Planet China: One Man's Attempt to Understand the World's Most Mystifying Nation (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 12. Mai 2009

4.0 von 5 Sternen 2 Kundenrezensionen

Alle 9 Formate und Ausgaben anzeigen Andere Formate und Ausgaben ausblenden
Preis
Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Kindle Edition
Taschenbuch
EUR 10,86
EUR 10,86 EUR 1,60
12 neu ab EUR 10,86 24 gebraucht ab EUR 1,60
click to open popover

Es wird kein Kindle Gerät benötigt. Laden Sie eine der kostenlosen Kindle Apps herunter und beginnen Sie, Kindle-Bücher auf Ihrem Smartphone, Tablet und Computer zu lesen.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

Geben Sie Ihre Mobiltelefonnummer ein, um die kostenfreie App zu beziehen.

Jeder kann Kindle Bücher lesen — selbst ohne ein Kindle-Gerät — mit der KOSTENFREIEN Kindle App für Smartphones, Tablets und Computer.


Produktinformation

Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

Amazon Best of the Month, July 2008: Maarten Troost is a laowai (foreigner) in the Middle Kingdom, ill-equipped with a sliver of Mandarin, questing to discover the "essential Chineseness" of an ancient and often mystifying land. What he finds is a country with its feet suctioned in the clay of traditional culture and a head straining into the polluted stratosphere of unencumbered capitalism, where cyclopean portraits of Chairman Mao (largely perceived as mostly good, except for that nasty bit toward the end) spoon comfortably with Hong Kong's embrace of rat-race modernity. From Beijing and its blitzes of flying phlegm--and girls who lend new meaning to "Chinese take-out"--to the legendary valley of Shangri-La (as officially designated by the Party), Troost learns that his very survival may hinge on his underdeveloped haggling skills and a willingness to deploy Rollerball-grade elbows over a seat on a train. Featuring visits to Mao's George Hamiltonian corpse and a rural market offering Siberian Tiger paw, cobra hearts, and scorpion kebabs (in the food section), Lost on Planet China is a funny and engrossing trip across a nation that increasingly demands the world's attention. --Jon Foro

Maarten Troost's Travel Tips for China

1. Food can be classified as meat, poultry, grain, fish, fruit, vegetable and Chinese. Embrace the Chinese. If you love it, it will love you back. True, you may find yourself perplexed by what resides on your plate. You may even be appalled. The Chinese have an expression: We eat everything with four legs except the table, and anything with two legs except the person. They mean it too. And so you may find yourself in a restaurant in Guangzhou contemplating the spicy cow veins; or the yak dumplings in Lhasa, or the grilled frog in Shanghai, or the donkey hotpot in the Hexi Corridor, or the live squid on the island of Putuoshan. And you may not know, exactly, what it is you’re supposed to do. Should you pluck at this with your chopsticks? The meal may seem so very strange. True, you may be comfortable eating a cow, or a pig, or a chicken, yet when confronted with a yak or a swan or a cat, you do not reflexively think of sauces and marinades. The Chinese do however. And so you should eat whatever skips across your table. It is here where you can experience the complexity of China. And you will be rewarded. Very often, it is exceptionally good. And when it is not, it is undoubtedly interesting. And really, when traveling what more can one ask for. So go on. Eat as the locals do. However, should you find yourself confronted with a heaping platter of Cattle Penis with Garlic, you’re on your own.

2. To really see China, go to the market. Any market will do. This is where China lives and breathes. It is here where you will find the sights, sounds and smells of China. And it is in a Chinese market where you will experience epic bargaining. The Chinese excel at bargaining. They live and breathe it. It is an art; it is a sport. It is, above all, nothing personal. If you do not parry back and forth, you will be regarded as a chump, a walking ATM machine, a carcass to be picked over. And so as you peruse the cabbage or consider the silk, be prepared to bargain. The objective, of course, is to obtain the Chinese price. You will, however, never actually receive the Chinese price. It is the holy grail for laowais--or foreigners--in China. Your status as a laowai is determined by how proximate your haggling gets you to the mythical Chinese price. But you will never obtain the Chinese price. Accept this. But if you’re very, very good, and you bargain long and hard, and if you are lucky and catch your interlocutor on an off day, you may, just may, receive the special price. Consider yourself fortunate.

3. Travelers are often told to get off the beaten path, to take the road less traveled, to march to a different drum. You don't need to do this in China. The road well-traveled is a very fine road. The French Concession in Shanghai is splendid. The Forbidden City is a wonder of the world. So too the Terracotta Warriors in Xi'an. Indeed, the Chinese say so themselves. There is much to be seen in places that are often seen. And yet... China is not merely a country. It is not a place defined by sights. It is a world upon itself, a different planet even. And to see it--to feel it--means leaving that well-traveled road. And China is an excellent place for wandering. From the monasteries of Tibet to the rainforests of Yunnan Province and onward through the deserts of Xinjiang to the frozen tundra of Heilongjiang Province, China offers a vast kaleidoscope of people and terrain unlike anywhere else on Earth. This may seem intimidating to the China traveler. Will there be picture menus in the Taklamakan Desert? (No.) Is Visa accepted in Inner Mongolia? (Not likely.) Still, one should move beyond the Great Wall. And if you can manage to cross six lanes of traffic in Beijing, you can manage the slow train to Kunming.

4. Hell is a line in China. You are so forewarned.

5. Manners are important in China. How can this be, you wonder? You have, for instance, experienced a line in China. Your ribs have been pummeled. You have been trampled upon by grandmothers who are not more than four feet tall. You have learned, simply by queuing in the airport taxi line, what it is like to eat bitter, an evocative Chinese expression that conveys suffering. This does not seem upon first impression to be a country overly concerned with prim etiquette. But it is. True, hawking enormous, gelatinous loogies is perfectly acceptable in China. And a good belch is fine as well. And picking your teeth after dinner is a sign of urbane sophistication. But this does not mean that manners are not taken seriously in China. It’s just that they are different in China. And so feel free to spit and burp, but do not even think of holding your chopsticks with your left hand. You will be regarded as an ill-mannered rube. So watch your manners in China. But learn them first.


-- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: Audio CD.

Pressestimmen

Praise for

GETTING STONED WITH SAVAGES



“One of Troost’s greatest successes is that he’s not reporting, exactly, not writing as a journalist would, but simply living his life in a faraway place and writing about it.”
--New York Times


“Troost manages to relate his misadventures in an irreverently funny style . . . this makes for a good beach read on your own vacation.”
--Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Praise for The Sex Lives of Cannibals

“A comic masterwork of travel writing” —Publishers Weekly

“Troost has a command of place and narrative that puts him in the company of some of today’s best travel writers.” —Elle

Alle Produktbeschreibungen

Kundenrezensionen

4,0 von 5 Sternen
Sagen Sie Ihre Meinung zu diesem Artikel
Alle 2 Kundenrezensionen anzeigen

Top-Kundenrezensionen

am 6. März 2013
Format: Kindle Edition|Verifizierter Kauf
0Kommentar|War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 17. Oktober 2010
Format: Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
0Kommentar|War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden

Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com

Amazon.com: 3,9 von 5 Sternen 204 Rezensionen
2 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich.
5,0 von 5 SternenWhen people asked me what China was like, I just gave them a copy of Lost ...
am 31. Dezember 2015 - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
5,0 von 5 SternenFantastic travel tale
am 23. August 2017 - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition|Verifizierter Kauf
4,0 von 5 SternenI have an exchange student from China this school year ...
am 27. November 2015 - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
5,0 von 5 SternenThis is a funny, wry
am 20. November 2014 - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition|Verifizierter Kauf
4,0 von 5 SternenGreat, but very different than previous books...
am 15. Mai 2014 - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition|Verifizierter Kauf
Möchten Sie weitere Produkte entdecken? Weitere Informationen finden Sie auf diesen Seiten: E Bässe, Recording

Wo ist meine Bestellung?

Versand & Rücknahme

Brauchen Sie Hilfe?