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Larklight (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 21. August 2007

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"Reeve's humor is oh-so-British and utterly entertaining.and Wyatt's full-page pen-and-inks and spot illustrations enhance the sense of delight. The climax is an absolute hoot, and leaves the door wide open for any number of sequels." -Publishers Weekly, starred review

" Reeve''s humor is oh-so-British and utterly entertaining... and Wyatt''s full-page pen-and-inks and spot illustrations enhance the sense of delight. The climax is an absolute hoot, and leaves the door wide open for any number of sequels." -- Publishers Weekly, starred review

" Reeve''s humor is oh-so-British and utterly entertaining ... and Wyatt''s full-page pen-and-inks and spot illustrations enhance the sense of delight. The climax is an absolute hoot, and leaves the door wide open for any number of sequels. " -- Publishers Weekly, starred review

"Reeve''s humor is oh-so-British and utterly entertaining.and Wyatt''s full-page pen-and-inks and spot illustrations enhance the sense of delight. The climax is an absolute hoot, and leaves the door wide open for any number of sequels." -Publishers Weekly, starred review -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine vergriffene oder nicht verfügbare Ausgabe dieses Titels.

Synopsis

Arthur (Art) Mumby and his irritating sister Myrtle live with their father in the huge and rambling house, Larklight, travelling through space on a remote orbit far beyond the Moon. One ordinary sort of morning they receive a correspondence informing them that a gentleman is on his way to visit, a Mr Webster. Visitors to Larklight are rare if not unique, and a frenzy of preparation ensues. But it is entirely the wrong sort of preparation, as they discover when their guest arrives, and a Dreadful and Terrifying (and marvellous) adventure begins. It takes them to the furthest reaches of Known Space, where they must battle the evil First Ones in a desperate attempt to save each other - and the Universe. Recounted through the eyes of Art himself, Larklight is sumptuously designed and illustrated throughout. -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine vergriffene oder nicht verfügbare Ausgabe dieses Titels.

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Format: Taschenbuch
Großartiges Buch. Die Story ist ein gewagter Mix aus allen möglichen Genres. Zwischendurch denkt man an Star Wars, Harry Potter, Piraten der Karibik und Die Liga der außergewöhnlichen Gentlemen. Eigentlich ist die Zielgruppe ja ein eher junges Publikum, aber auch mit über 30 Jahren hat das Buch noch Spaß gemacht. Wer britischen (verhaltenen) Humor mag, Steampunk kennt oder kennenlernen möchte und kein Problem mit jugendlichen Protagonisten hat, sollte schnell zugreifen, bevor die Verfilmung diesen großartigen Stoff einem Massenpublikum unter die Nase reibt.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verifizierter Kauf
Ach, was heißt Jugendbuch. Ich bin jetzt 54 und habe es aus vollen Zügen genossen. Ich wurde förmlich eingesponnen - wer das Buch gelesen hat, weiß, was ich meine. :-)
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Format: Taschenbuch
When eleven-year-old Art Mumby finds out that a visitor is arriving at his run-down home, Larklight, which floats in space beyond the moon, he hardly expects to be thrust into a frightening adventure of pirates, plates, and a millenium-long conflict upon which the fate of the solar system rests. He tells the story of this adventure in LARKLIGHT (occasionally giving his older sister, Myrtle, a chance to narrate via her diary), and the story is nothing if not fantastic.

Philip Reeve (author of the HUNGRY CITY CHRONICLES) has created another fascinating world in LARKLIGHT. Art lives in the Victorian society of the 1800's--or rather, what Victorian society would have looked like if they'd developed space travel, and astronomy worked according to early speculations about aether (an air-like substance in space that people can move and breathe in), and interplanetary beings (Venus, Mars, and the moons of Jupiter are all home to a variety of life forms). Reeve cuts no corners, painting the cities and citizens of the solar system in dazzling detail. The setting is a gorgeous mix of fantasy and science fiction, and fans of both genres will find much to enjoy.

If the world wasn't exciting enough on its own, the adventure is of the edge-of-your-seat variety. Art and Myrtle tumble from one tense situation to another with alarming frequency. Most chapters end on cliffhangers, so be prepared to have trouble finding a place to pause. Reeve throws in enough twists and turns to keep readers guessing right until the end, and both Art and Myrtle get the chance to play hero.

Art, as the main character, is not yet a teen himself, so teens may find his narration a little immature for their liking. If they're willing to give him a chance, though, they will discover that LARKLIGHT is a fast-paced, imaginative journey well worth taking.

Reviewed by: Lynn Crow
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Amazon.com: 4.4 von 5 Sternen 64 Rezensionen
46 von 49 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen For there is a pirate king (there is!) 5. Mai 2007
Von E. R. Bird - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Space. It's so done, isn't it? Nine times out of ten the stories that take place in outer space are just metaphors for cowboys anyway. Star Wars. Star Trek. Firefly. Some work better than others, but the idea of a sci-fi space-based children's book would, under normal circumstances, do nothing to lift the rate of my pulse. Obviously this must have occurred to author Philip Reeve as well. Best known until now for his The Hungry City Chronicles, Reeve turns his sights on his nation's dirty past. But what if that dirty past were transposed into the outer regions of space? A space where breathing in zero gravity isn't really a problem, there are aliens galore, and the British figured out how to conquer the universe when Isaac Newton figured out space travel? Suddenly things are looking a lot more interesting.

Living on a lonely little home floating not too far from their beloved Earth, young Art Mumby and his older sister Myrtle have only known Larklight as their home. After their mother disappeared a couple years ago, however, their father has become increasingly lost in his own private world. That all changes when suddenly when, without warning, Larklight and its denizens (robot servants and otherwise) are attacked by giant, vicious spiders. Art and Myrtle barely escape with their lives and in doing so come in direct contact with the infamous space pirate Jack Havock (approximate age: 14). It appears that there was always more to Larklight than met the eye, and when the siblings are split apart they must individually find a way to defeat a nefarious villain, save the British empire, and recover the ones they love. Pluck, in large quantities, is going to be necessary.

Really, colonialism in space isn't necessarily a new idea either. Even Douglas Adams knew that. But to the best of my supremely limited knowledge, no one has ever created a sci-fi children's novel where the essential premise is that space travel came to Earth early. Just extrapolate that a little further and you end up with Britain at the height of its let's-grab-all-the-countries-in-the-world ideology, only transplanted into the universe at large and onto innocent planets (and their inhabitants). It's seamless. With peculiar aliens brought to London for "research", space colonists yearning to see the motherland, and a smattering of history alongside (the American colonies are still feisty but not, as of yet, beating England in the 19th century space race) the author turns the screw just a bit more when he makes the villain the biggest colonist of them all.

Reeve employs a skill that has stood him in good stead all these years; He can make any situation believable. I mean, have you ever read his "Hungry City" titles? Few authors could pull off the whole in-the-future-wheeled-cities-will-eat-other-cities idea. He can. Now, having conquered the future, he's determined to bend the past to his will as well. And if along the way he's able to package it all in a kind of boy's adventure style, so be it. At times you can tell that the author is showing off too. To place this book thoroughly in its time period there are plenty of references to famous characters of the day. Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. Andrew Marvell. Even a quick poem by Lord Tennyson that comes close to being almost too clever. And the boy's adventure style actually works perfectly as the kind of tale Reeves wants to tell. Art is an upstanding fellow who, when his home has been attacked by gigantic spiders and his father undoubtedly killed, leads his sister to safety with a stiff, "I am afraid that something rather disagreeable has happened." Do not assume that Myrtle is your typical faint and gasp heroine, however. That is the advantage of writing this kind of book today. First of all, she sports a natty little pair of glasses making her the best glasses-wearing sci-fi space traveler since Meg Murry in A Wrinkle in Time. Be that as it may, she's an unapologetic loyalist. Myrtle only sees the world (at first, anyway) as society would have her see it. Art too, for that matter. For example, he mentions that the denizens of the moon were "discovered" by the British they, "were so primitive that they showed no interest whatsoever in the new arrivals." And thusly does the p-word raise its ugly head. Myrtle, for her part, is particularly discomfited to hear of a British secret agent taking a Martian "native" as a wife.

Part of the reason I enjoy Reeve as an author is his sense of humor. He pulls off sentences and scenes that simply should not work, and all because he knows how to utilize a kind of inspired sense of style. For example, when it looks like all is lost for Art he says, "It seemed so unfair to have one's father eaten by a spider and one's sister devoured by a caterpillar on the same day (though I suppose flies must put up with that sort of thing all the time and you do not hear them moaning about it)." Or, in another instance, the alien shipmates are, "bellowing out a lusty shanty called, `Farewell and Adieu to You Ladies of Ph'Arhpuu'xxtpllsprngg'." Or (and this is a single instance so don't judge the book harshly for it) there is even a moment when the captain of a ship turns to one of his crew to ask for the impossible. The response? "I cannae do it, Captain. I'm an alchemist, not an engineer."

It would be easy to miss the author's clever little dance is done around questions of religion and spirituality, I think. In part because it simply doesn't fit in with the essential premise (i.e. gigantic "makers" who merrily go about creating the universe) but also because a man can only write a children's book that's so long. I was a little shocked to see that even with all the illustrations, "Larklight" only comes to a slip of 400 pages. By rights, it should be longer.

Speaking of the illustrations, pity me. I read this book initially without the final art. Even worse? I didn't even know the sheer vast amounts of art that would appear in the final copy. I didn't know that a David Wyatt would essentially bend over backwards to bring to life the perfect convergence of space and Victorian tales of heroism and derring-do. When I finally did get my hands on a final copy of the book I was stunned. I spent the better part of an hour pouring over the book again to see whether or not the images I'd conjured up in my head were anything like Wyatt's. Sometimes they were. Myrtle, for example, was spot on. Ditto Art, his parents, and maybe even the villain (lips sealed on that one) near the end. Oh! And when a certain architectural structure becomes a nightmarish horror, THAT looked bloody brilliant! Sadly I wasn't particularly taken with the views of Jack and the alien Ssilissa. They didn't gel with how I'd pictured them, but that isn't to say they weren't accurate to the story itself. And Jack does kind of resemble a 14-year-old Humphrey Bogart. Whether you agree with the artist's visions or not, the book may well be worth the price of admission alone based solely on the endpapers. A mishmash of Victorian newspaper ads mixed with space aliens and technology, I half wondered if Reeve had secretly written these as well. Watson's Dirigible Domestic Aid. Hogwash (for cleaning one's hoverhogs). Taylor's Pure Icthyomoroph Liver Oil. And, most cleverly of all, "Rossetti's Goblin Fair `Come Buy, Come Buy!' 42 Stalls. Fruit, Berries, Treen, Owl, Wheedling, Country Crafts, Exotic Conserves, Bog Fettling, Scalding and Rummagin." Someone give one of these men an award for this tiny ad alone, please.

All in all, it's a romp. A show. A true example of sci-fi done to the maximum amusement of its readers. That this book isn't well known to all children everywhere is a crime. But science fiction hasn't hit the renaissance that fantasy has. As a result, we must push and push to bring books of this caliber to the attention of the world. I've done my part. I suggest you, on the other hand, just go through the motions of reading it. Once you have, sheer exuberance for how good it is should take care of the rest.
12 von 12 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Courtesy of Teens Read Too 30. November 2006
Von TeensReadToo - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
When eleven-year-old Art Mumby finds out that a visitor is arriving at his run-down home, Larklight, which floats in space beyond the moon, he hardly expects to be thrust into a frightening adventure of pirates, plates, and a millenium-long conflict upon which the fate of the solar system rests. He tells the story of this adventure in LARKLIGHT (occasionally giving his older sister, Myrtle, a chance to narrate via her diary), and the story is nothing if not fantastic.

Philip Reeve (author of the Mortal Engines (The Hungry City Chronicles)) has created another fascinating world in LARKLIGHT. Art lives in the Victorian society of the 1800's--or rather, what Victorian society would have looked like if they'd developed space travel, and astronomy worked according to early speculations about aether (an air-like substance in space that people can move and breathe in), and interplanetary beings (Venus, Mars, and the moons of Jupiter are all home to a variety of life forms). Reeve cuts no corners, painting the cities and citizens of the solar system in dazzling detail. The setting is a gorgeous mix of fantasy and science fiction, and fans of both genres will find much to enjoy.

If the world wasn't exciting enough on its own, the adventure is of the edge-of-your-seat variety. Art and Myrtle tumble from one tense situation to another with alarming frequency. Most chapters end on cliffhangers, so be prepared to have trouble finding a place to pause. Reeve throws in enough twists and turns to keep readers guessing right until the end, and both Art and Myrtle get the chance to play hero.

Art, as the main character, is not yet a teen himself, so teens may find his narration a little immature for their liking. If they're willing to give him a chance, though, they will discover that LARKLIGHT is a fast-paced, imaginative journey well worth taking.

Reviewed by: Lynn Crow
16 von 18 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Could have been better 22. Februar 2007
Von Fred - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
I really wanted to like this book. It seemed like exactly the kind of thing I've been waiting for without realizing it. But it fell short for me. For some reason I just couldn't get into it. I can't put my finger on it, but I never really got very involved, and I didn't really find myself looking forward to continuing it each day. The only parts that were compelling to me were Myrtle's diary chapters. Perhaps that's the thing, that the rest of the writing felt too detached, like I was watching it from afar instead of feeling involved.

The two biggest problems I had were as follows:

1) The character of Myrtle was too annoying for too long. I knew that the idea was that she'd redeem herself, but there was nothing endearing about her that made me want anything other than for her to just disappear from the story all together. Later in the book her diary pages were good, but that was because they mostly dropped the annoying aspects of her character.

2) I didn't find the spiders to be even remotely plausible. That's a problem since they're what the whole story is about. Yes, I know this is a wild fantasy, but even within the reality of the book they didn't feel right to me.

I'm giving the book 4 stars though because I do believe that its target audience will enjoy it more than I did (I'm not a kid). It's not a bad book, it's just that, well, as my review title says, it could have been better. The retro-future Victorian sci-fi world was a lot of fun and hopefully future installments will keep all of the good elements from this book and improve on the less stellar ones (no pun intended). At least in the next book Myrtle (theoretically) won't be so annoying.

Almost forgot: some of the little inside jokes were fun, such as the interpolation of a bit of H.G. Wells' "War of the Worlds."
7 von 7 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Philip Reeve and David Wyatt are back for another incredible book! 8. Dezember 2008
Von A. Williams - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
I cannot express how much I love these books!
I am utterly impressed with Reeve's detailed, personable characters that are consistent and yet allowed the room to grow. The characters in this series are so delightful and varied... I am always anxious for Art's amusing and surprisingly insightful views on events, and Myrtle's delightfully tedious social commentary and lady-like instructions.

Larklight, the first book in the series, became an instant favorite, and while I loved Starcross (book two) I wasn't *quite* as attached to it as I was to Larklight. But, Mothstorm is just as good as Larklight, and honestly I can't think of a way to make either Larklight or Mothstorm more perfect!

In the third installment the Mumby family faces their strongest enemy yet and find their entire universe resting on their shoulders. (I don't know how Reeve will top that for another - hopefully another - book, but I have great faith that he will!) Mothstorm is not only action packed, busting with wit (in a fun, friendly way... nothing pretentious, only smart and amusing), but many times I found myself engrossed with the ethical and moral dilemmas the characters had to confront and touched by the troubles they had to go through and the strong relationships they have.

I was captivated from the beginning and curious until the end. And while I wasn't sure which way the story would end, or how it could possibly end in the way I was hoping, it did and it all made perfect sense (no fudging with the plots! Yay!).

Perfect for readers of any age. Reeve writes in a way that should captivate the young and the old. I can't recommend these books highly enough!
6 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen per Kindle edition 6. Juli 2011
Von C. Mangone - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verifizierter Kauf
This book (this entire series really) is just pure fun. The plot, writing, setting, and characters are crisp, imaginative, and pretty much everything I never knew I always wanted. Not to mention the illustrations, which are amazing. In the paper version.

Unfortunately, the difference in quality between the paper illustrations and the Kindle ones is enough to make me dock a star. I know the Kindle can handle complex art. I jailbroke mine and have quite the collection as screensavers. However, Mr Wyatt's illustrations have so far appeared heavily pixelated. It's disappointing given how detailed and wonderful I know they are and could be.
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