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Lapsing into a Comma: A Curmudgeon's Guide to the Many Things That Can Go Wrong in Print - And How to Avoid Them (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 1. Mai 2000

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  • Lapsing into a Comma: A Curmudgeon's Guide to the Many Things That Can Go Wrong in Print - And How to Avoid Them
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  • The Elephants of Style: A Trunkload of Tips on the Big Issues and Gray Areas of Contemporary American English
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Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

Who knew a stylebook could be so much fun? For lovers of language, Lapsing Into a Comma is a sensible and very funny guide to the technicalities of writing and copy editing. Author Bill Walsh, chief copy editor in the business section of the Washington Post, humorously discusses the changing rules of proper print style in the information age. Is it "e-mail" or "email"? According to established grammatical rules, it should be e-mail, but in common practice, we often use email (which should be pronounced "uhmail," but we all know not to do that). Therefore, email is OK.

Walsh does not advocate tossing your AP Stylebook, but he does encourage using your head and not blindly adhering to formal rules. "A finely tuned ear is at least as important as formal grammar," he says, "and that's not something you can acquire by memorizing a stylebook." What about companies that use punctuation in their logos? Walsh cautions against confusing a logo with a name. You wouldn't use "Tech Stock Surge Boosts Yahoo!" as a headline unless you wrote for a very excitable newspaper. And then there's arbitrary capitalization. "The dot-com era has leveled a wall that Adidas and K.D. Lang and Thirtysomething had already cracked," says Walsh, "and suddenly writers and editors faced with a name are asking, "Is that capitalized?"--a question that's about as appropriate as asking a 5-year-old, 'Do you want that Coke with or without rum?'"

The first half of Lapsing Into a Comma zips along, making you think about the intricacies of grammar and editing--all while trying not to choke on laughter. The second half is Walsh's personally crafted style guide. Remember--Roommate: Two m's, unless you ate a room or mated with a roo. --Dana Van Nest

Synopsis

No writer's or editor's desk is complete without a battered, page-bent copy of the "AP Stylebook". However, this not-so-easy-to-use reference of journalistic style is often not up-to-date and leaves reporters and copyeditors unsatisfied. Bill Walsh, copy chief for the "Washington Post"'s business desk, addresses these shortcomings in "Lapsing into a Comma". In an opinionated, humorous, and yes, curmudge only way, he shows how to apply the basic rules to unique, modern grammar issues. Walsh explains how to deal with perplexing situations such as trendy words, foreign terms, and web speak.

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Format: Taschenbuch
Every copy editor (and many who think they're copy editors) should own and faithfully read and reference this book. "Lapsing into a Comma" has the same wit and humor previously found on Walsh's Web site The Slot, and keeps things in a clear and concise fashion that anyone (and by that I mean non-grammar people like myself) can understand. The book answers several questions the AP Stylebook just doesn't cover, and clarifies several things the stylebook does cover.
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Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.1 von 5 Sternen 50 Rezensionen
3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Comma Confusion 17. April 2013
Von Arago - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
This is a style book I can actually read and enjoy as well as a reference book for my writer's shelf. I am occasionally tempted to check it with other authorities, and find that it's factual, after all. I learn from the book every time I open it when I thought I was pretty good at this stuff. Thank you, Mr. Walsh, for adding to my store of references and my knowledge about my craft. By the way, I re-read this for errors, and removed two commas. I have an urge to put them back but I would only take them out again.
6 von 8 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Useful and fun 2. Mai 2004
Von Judgeman - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
Bill Walsh, the Washington Post's copy editor for national news, is an unabashed "prescriptivist" -- someone for whom, in writing, there are things that are wrong because they've always been wrong. "Even if you think it's arrogant to condemn a perfectly understandable bit of prose as 'wrong,'" he writes, "you have to answer one big question: Do you want to look stupid?"
With "The Elephants of Style" you'll reduce the chance of sounding stupid, increase the likelihood that your writing will have style -- or, as Walsh puts it, FLAIR! ELAN! PANACHE! -- and have a lot of fun. "The Elephants of Style" is the rare book about writing and style that you may (as I did) read from cover to cover for sheer pleasure -- like the pleasure of learning that "the New York train station is Grand Central Terminal," but "Grand Central Station remains the correct expression for mothers yelling at their kids about running in and out of the kitchen."
I'll admit it: I'm one of those lovers of English who has shelves full of books about writing and the use of our language. I regularly read Walsh's website "The Slot: A Spot for Copy Editors," and I also purchased his first book, "Lapsing Into a Comma," which also was a delight. "Lapsing" was aimed at an audience of more sophisticated word users or, as Walah says, was written for editors and writers. "Elephants of Style," he says, was written for writers and editors. It will benefit everyone, I say, from professional writers and editors to middle-school English students. I recommend it highly.
1 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Digerati need not be illiterati 9. Januar 2013
Von Andrew Everett - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
The Internet and print-on-demand technology have enabled almost everyone to become a publisher. In traditional media, professional journalists and authors have their writing cleaned up by copy editors before it is published. The average blogger does not have this luxury. In Lapsing Into a Comma, Bill Walsh shares his advice on how to handle many common problems that he has encountered as copy editor of the business section at the Washington Post.

This book starts with nine chapters covering various grammatical issues followed by a stylebook with approximately 340 entries. Most publishers adopt a style guide such as the Associated Press Stylebook or the Chicago Manual of Style. Walsh frequently refers to the AP stylebook, but sometimes disagrees with it. Style is not about being a slave to fifth-grade grammar rules. It's about making informed choices and being consistent.

Language rules could be a very dull topic, but Walsh writes with a highly-opinionated attitude and a sense of humor, making the book more engaging than it otherwise would be. My favorite line in the book is: "Digerati need not be illiterati."
5.0 von 5 Sternen Excellent guide 23. Januar 2014
Von mike - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
Wonderful guide to proper use of grammar; answered many questions about good sentence structure and clear expression of the writer's thoughts.
The Elephants of Style is also a necessary guide for writers and proofreaders. Bill Walsh does an exemplary job of clearly explaining the reasons behind correct usage.
Thank you.
7 von 8 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Style with Humor 6. September 2001
Von Doug Kueffler - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
This may go beyond what the typical office worker needs to know about style as it is heavily weighted toward newspaper writing. The author is a copy editing guy, (ok, THE copy editing guy) at the Washington Post. But there is plenty of information on common usage as well. Sometimes the errors we make (or we all have other people TELL us we are making) are just a matter of personal preference. Bill Walsh has his own strong preferences but also allows that other usages are not necessarily incorrect. (He is often at odds with the AP stylebook.) I like his approach and find that he provides excellent comparisons and reasoning for what we read and hear every day. Useful and funny too.
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