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In the Land of Invisible Women: A Female Doctor's Journey in the Saudi Kingdom von [Ahmed, Qanta]
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In the Land of Invisible Women: A Female Doctor's Journey in the Saudi Kingdom Kindle Edition

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Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

Ahmed was saddened, distressed, and taken aback by her colleagues' excitement in reaction to the 9/11 attacks. Her friends talked about how America "deserved" this tragedy because of its support of Israel.


Denied visa renewal in America, British-born Pakistani physician Ahmed, 31, leaves New York for a job in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, where she celebrates her Muslim faith on an exciting Hajj pilgrimage to Mecca... After 9/11, she is shocked at the widespread anti-Americanism. The details of consumerism, complete with Western brand names .... are central to this honest memoir about connections and conflicts, and especially the clamorous clash of "modern and medieval, . . . Cadillac and camel."

A big-hearted examination of the extreme contradictions in a society very different-yet not so different-from our own.

"Despite the restrictive customs of Saudi's religious rule, Ahmed found a vibrancy that left her hopeful. 'Saudi is much more heterogeneous than one would expect, ' she says. 'Muslims themselves feel fairly lost in a country so caricatured and vilified for its severe austerity and Wahhabi theocracy, but it's also the cradle of Islam and the site of the Hajj-a symbol of what Islam could be.'"

""In the Land of Invisible Women" is a must read for everyone. Why? People must find out how Dr. Ahmed dared to cope with radical Islamic fundamentalism. Rather than misery and despair, her story is one of brightness and optimism for Saudi women. But equally vital, it is a tale of expectation, a hope that brave Saudi men, who dare read her story, might have a jolt of conscience over unjustified cowardly feelings they hold toward women." - Blog Critics

"Ahmed was saddened, distressed, and taken aback by her colleagues' excitement in reaction to the 9/11 attacks. Her friends talked about how America "deserved" this tragedy because of its support of Israel.
" - ForeWord

"Denied visa renewal in America, British-born Pakistani physician Ahmed, 31, leaves New York for a job
in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, where she celebrates her Muslim faith on an exciting Hajj pilgrimage to Mecca...
After 9/11, she is shocked at the widespread anti-Americanism. The details of consumerism, complete with Western brand names .... are central to this honest memoir about connections and conflicts, and
especially the clamorous clash of "modern and medieval, . . . Cadillac and camel."" - Booklist

"A female doctor provides a uniquely revealing look at the hidden world of Saudi Arabian women.
Denied a renewal of her visa in the United States, British-born, American-educated pulmonologist Ahmed accepted a position at a hospital in Riyadh. On rounds, the male residents she supervised would interrupt her, and female residents (what few there were) would cluster silently at the back of the group. All female doctors were required to be completely veiled. In surgeries, sons would supervise unconscious mothers, not to ensure the quality of their medical care, but to ensure that no parts of their faces were revealed by slipping veils. With such evidence around her, Ahmed began to think of these women as the wretched of the Earth. "I wouldn't be corrected in my simplistic views," she writes, "until much later, when I had befriended more Saudi women." When she did, she learned that the lives of these women under veils were no less complex and rich for being largely unseen. At her first party, she was astounded by the elegance and confidence exuded by professional women who had struggled immensely to achieve their positions. She began to understand how respect and love for women were expressed in her adopted society. Despite the strict monitoring of their clothing and behavior and the edicts against showing even the smallest scrap of skin in public, the Saudi women she met were neither so silent nor so helpless as their formless presence suggested. However, her friends were wealthy and educated; the vast impoverished majority could not even afford to visit doctors, let alone become one. Though never ceasing to be dismayed by the uglier aspects of regressive Saudi orthodoxy, Ahmed also found her own Muslim faith deepened and her conception of Islam broadened by her sojourn there. If she never learned to love the veil, she at least learned to understand it.
A big-hearted examination of the extreme contradictions in a society very different-yet not so different-from our own.
" - Kirkus

""Despite the restrictive customs of Saudi's religious rule, Ahmed found a vibrancy that left her hopeful. 'Saudi is much more heterogeneous than one would expect, ' she says. 'Muslims themselves feel fairly lost in a country so caricatured and vilified for its severe austerity and Wahhabi theocracy, but it's also the cradle of Islam and the site of the Hajj-a symbol of what Islam could be.'"" - Kirkus

"Ahmed still beautifully asserts her arguments and confronts the anti-Semitism, the sexism, and the anti-western attitudes she experienced... In the Land of Invisible Women gave me a lot to think about, and just not about the complexities of Saudi Arabia but also my country's, the U.S.A., interactions within the Middle East. " - Adventures in Reading

"This book is a well -written and fascinating insider's look into life in Saudi Arabia and the challenges that women and sometimes even men must face in their daily lives." - Bookopolis

"In the Land of Invisible Women is a must read for everyone. Why? People must find out how Dr. Ahmed dared to cope with radical Islamic fundamentalism. Rather than misery and despair, her story is one of brightness and optimism for Saudi women. But equally vital, it is a tale of expectation, a hope that brave Saudi men, who dare read her story, might have a jolt of conscience over unjustified cowardly feelings they hold toward women." - Blog Critics

Kurzbeschreibung

"In this stunningly written book, a Western trained Muslim doctor brings alive what it means for a woman to live in the Saudi Kingdom. I've rarely experienced so vividly the shunning and shaming, racism and anti-Semitism, but the surprise is how Dr. Ahmed also finds tenderness at the tattered edges of extremism, and a life-changing pilgrimage back to her Muslim faith." - Gail Sheehy

The decisions that change your life are often the most impulsive ones.

Unexpectedly denied a visa to remain in the United States, Qanta Ahmed, a young British Muslim doctor, becomes an outcast in motion. On a whim, she accepts an exciting position in Saudi Arabia. This is not just a new job; this is a chance at adventure in an exotic land she thinks she understands, a place she hopes she will belong.

What she discovers is vastly different. The Kingdom is a world apart, a land of unparralled contrast. She finds rejection and scorn in the places she believed would most embrace her, but also humor, honesty, loyalty and love.

And for Qanta, more than anything, it is a land of opportunity. A place where she discovers what it takes for one woman to recreate herself in the land of invisible women.

Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 2901 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 467 Seiten
  • Verlag: Sourcebooks; Auflage: 1 (1. September 2008)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B003BLY772
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Aktiviert
  • Screenreader: Unterstützt
  • Verbesserter Schriftsatz: Aktiviert
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 3.7 von 5 Sternen 3 Kundenrezensionen
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: #377.798 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop (Siehe Top 100 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop)

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Format: Taschenbuch
Ich habe das Buch mit viel Interesse gelesen, obwohl es sich teilweise doch sehr streckt. Es ist also nur denen, die sich wirklich an der Thematik (Gesellschaft Saudi Arabiens, v.a. Frauen) interessiert. Der Schreibstil ist sehr malerisch und platzt mit Adjektivern aus allen nähten, ist aber nicht langweilig. Die Autorin zeigt offen und ehrlich Kritik an der arabischen Gesellschaft, solidarisiert aber extrem mit dem Islamischen Glauben an sich, was ja nicht verkehrt ist, für mich als Atheistin aber etwas übertrieben wirkte.

Alles in allem ist es ein empfehlenswertes Werk, basierend auf persönlichen Erfahrungen der Autorin und Fachliteratur über die Politik Saudi Arabiens, die die Autorin auch in einer Quellenangabe zitiert und somit ihre Fakten auch belegt. Definitiv erweitert man sein eigenes Wissen über das Königreich wenn man das Buch liest.
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Eine pakistan-stämmige Britin & Ärztin bereichtet von ihrer Arbeit während mehrerer Jahre an einem Krankenhaus in Saudi-Arabien. Einmaliger Blick einer nichtvoreingenommenen Muslima hinter die Kulissen des entrückten Königreichs!
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es bietet schon einen interessanten Einblick, aber die Autorin versucht so verzweifelt, eine gute Muslima zu werden, dass ich es über lange Strecken lächerlich finde.
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Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta) (Kann Kundenrezensionen aus dem "Early Reviewer Rewards"-Programm beinhalten)

Amazon.com: 4.1 von 5 Sternen 537 Rezensionen
19 von 19 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen disturbing for western women... 14. Juli 2016
Von R. Van Anda - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
This is a book club selection that I must read. It is a tough go just because it is a disturbing topic. To think that women are treated as a bunch of 'black bundles' all sitting together in the airport...it is just too disturbing. I did learn much that should be given a wider distribution. I did not know that until the 1970's women in Saudi Arabia had all manner of privileges. It was the Saudi royal family's fear that the Wahabi sect could sieze their power that caused a pandering to the 'dark side' that covered women in black polyester and began their dreadful treatment. This pandering to the extremists has been the cause of so much of the destruction in that part of the world. May we all learn from that lesson.
27 von 29 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A Magnificent Memoir 29. März 2015
Von Marie E. Laconte - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verifizierter Kauf
I read this book not so much to learn about Dr. Qanta Ahmed's experience, but to recall my own. I wanted to say, "Yes! Yes! That's the way it was!" at every turn of the page, and I was able to do so. Her descriptions of sights, scents, sounds, clothing, surroundings and people are spot-on accurate. Perhaps I might have found those details excessive, had I not lived in Riyadh for twelve years, worked in a hospital, and experienced much of what she experienced. Her narrative portrays objective truth, for her and for me and for many women like us-- Westernized Muslims who have lived and worked in a Riyadh hospital during the 1980s and 90s.

It also portrays an internal truth that rings true for me. In many ways, her story is an ordinary story, in that she progressed through the same adjustments we all experienced during our stay in Riyadh, yet nothing in Riyadh was ordinary. We single women who formed an esoteric group of medical professionals, both expatriate and Arab, shared a path-- a wonderful, exciting path that is portrayed beautifully in this book.

A single woman could hardly spend any time in Riyadh without enduring her own Muttawa story, the elements of which are identical for all us us, though the details differ. We did not ride in cars too many times before being pursued by eager males, who sometimes latched onto our vehicles and didn't give up until our nervous drivers reached our combination havens/prisons behind gates and guards.

We endured the uncertainty and confusion of how to relate to male colleagues from different areas of the world. We often fell in love with one or more of them. The term "Riyadh Romance" carried a specific meaning, referring to an attraction that blossomed there, but maybe withered when transplanted.

We could hardly seek to understand anything without making peace with wearing the the abaya, and discovering that it, along with the scarf and sometimes face veil, let us glide comfortably through the same spaces our uncovered colleagues found awkward.

We discovered the depths of emotion, talent, and ambition present in women who previously seemed insipid under their black wraps. We entered the lush world of Saudi femininity and saw-- literally-- what men are not allowed to see. We reclaimed the state of sisterhood we may have felt as prepubescent girls.

We ended up in Mecca sooner or later, if we were Muslim, and we opened our hearts to God wider than they'd been opened before.

We also learned that some ugly national stereotypes held up well under observation, just as those we carried with us from our countries of origin.

We opened our eyes to complex political situations that showed us unequivocally that the poles of East and West really do intend to destroy each other on the glorified backdrop of justice. We learned to pray that those poles be dissolved, if not brought into the fold on a realistic backdrop of justice. We realized that the most we can achieve is a mitigation, not a restoration, of rights inherent to the state of human existence, rights that some people enjoy from birth, and others are denied.

This memoir is, after all, a memoir, and should be read as such. For those of us who've lived in the Kingdom, it will bring memories into close focus. For others of us, it should inspire investigation into the subjects it addresses. I cannot imagine that this book could disappoint anyone who holds even a superficial interest in memoir, East-West relations, Islam, Saudi Arabia, or the expatriate experience in Riyadh.
18 von 18 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Enlightening and educational material 16. November 2011
Von Christine Smith - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verifizierter Kauf
I have been curious about Muslim women and had some preconceived notions of what they were like. I thought they were treated much like slaves were treated and they accepted the abuse and subjugation with a sad dismissal. I was glad to know that they are like the rest of us in many ways and there are actually feminists in their ranks. I have to wonder exactly when the men were allowed to change Islam to enslave them so? Why did they put up with it? How could independent women and open-minded men allow this to happen? The book relates some of this, but not all. I realized the book relayed a spiritual awakening for Qanta. I was happy to see that she learned about her religion, but I wonder why she wasn't taught about this earlier? She isn't alone in this. I realized in all religions, there are people who do not ask questions or learn for themselves. It was such a relief to know she questioned the answers at times and had many questions about everything there.

Others have criticized her style of writing. It was different, but not bad. I have seen much worse from very popular authors who apparently were not introduced to an editor at all. Some of the sayings and initials were a bit much at times, but I imagine if you were to read a Christian book, some of those would tend to irritate as well. One thing that annoyed me was that if you were drawing conclusions about women in Saudi Arabia from this book, they are all the most gorgeous women in the world. If one was to remove the coverings, the beauty would just be incredible! No wonder they are all covered! It would be more than any male could stand. Of course, she also believes the men are also absolutely gorgeous and sexy especially in their robes.

At any rate, I enjoyed the book a lot. It was a real learning experience and I enjoyed reading about her trip to Mecca for Hajj. It is very hard to believe that women in this day and age have to put up with so much. I am glad things have changed for the better, but there is so much more to be done.

This was a Kindle book and some of the words were cut, but that's how it is. It was still easy to see what was meant.
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Hugely informative. 9. Juni 2017
Von Francoise Rambach - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
This book is full of information. I thought that Saudi Arabia was like all the other Muslim countries but this book taught me that it has its very own Wahabi interpretation of Islam. The Saudis LIVE their religion, referring constantly to Allah and quoting the teachings of the Prophet Muhammad. Of course the oppression of women and these horrible, offensive, undignified abbayas and the harsh disciplinarian police are something I just cannot fathom.
Although I am an atheist I understood the author's emotional and spiritual attraction to Hajj. Qanta Ahmed also shows that - like everywhere else in the world alas - there is discrimination between "pure Saudi" and other muslims as well as huge class distinctions even at Mecca, where the rich pilgrims pray in relative comfort whereas the poor have none. There are also descriptions of "vegas" like decorations in the houses of
the very rich, the hugely expensive cars the men drive recklessly.
The relationship between men and women, even in a working place like the hospital where Dr. Ahmed was a lung specialist and where she was in constant contact with male colleagues, was impossible because of the prevailing culture.
This is a fantastic book written in a way that makes the reader understand a culture so different from the western. I wish more books like that were written.
3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen and that by America supporting Israel that America is also hated by association 27. Oktober 2014
Von Lynda R. - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verifizierter Kauf
Interesting insider view of the life of a professional Muslim woman in Saudi Arabia. Her observations and experiences show that hatreds against the Jews is taught to everyone from an early age, and that by America supporting Israel that America is also hated by association. I was appalled at the reaction of Saudi professionals to the 9/11 attack in New York City, even those who were educated at American Universities and Medical Schools. America has, by and large, overcome racial prejudice, but it is alive and active in the Saudi Kingdom. Based on this account, it is not so surprising that most of the 9/11 hijackers were Saudis.

The Kingdom wide ban on women driving, and the insistence that women cover their bodies and hair in accordance with Sharia Law was also interesting. Women are second class citizens, no matter how well educated. The Sharia Law enforcement police are a nightmare. Even the men fear them. I fully understand why the author wanted to leave Saudi and return to the freedoms she was accustomed to enjoying in the U.S. as soon as she was able to do so.

Her description of her Haji trip to Mecca was so enlightening. It gave me a much more complete understanding of what Mecca and Medina mean to the people of Islam. She was able to deepen her Muslim Faith while at the same time abhoring the restrictions placed by the super Fundamentalists upon the faithful.
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