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The Knowledge-Creating Company: How Japanese Companies Create the Dynamics of Innovation von [Nonaka, Ikujiro, Takeuchi, Hirotaka]
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The Knowledge-Creating Company: How Japanese Companies Create the Dynamics of Innovation 1 , Kindle Edition

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Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

"A fascinating, exciting exposure to a new way of thinking about the knowledge-based company....Provides a model of knowledge creation that will be a touchstone of future work in this field....This important, imaginative book will challenge and intrigue managers and management scholars alike."--D.
Eleanor Westney, MIT Sloan School of Management in the Sloan Management Review
"A fascinating volume that will interest philosophers, managers, and more common readers....The analyses are so thorough that they make the one- and two-page descriptions in Forbes magazine seem like elementary fairy stories. The authors have done their research well and provide delightful
details."--Minneapolis Star Tribune
"Knowledge creation is to the 90s what excellence was to the 80s. I can't imagine a better book on organizational design for innovation. Nor can I imagine a better common focus for managers and scholars. This is the best and most original blend of organizational theory and practice we are likely to
see for some time."--Karl E. Weick, University of Michigan School of Business Administration
"This is the most creative book on management to come out of Japan. The same authors who introduced the rugby approach to new product development, now bring us a myriad of new concepts: tacit knowledge, the oneness of mind and body, middle-up-down management, hypertext organization, to name a few.
The insights for this book originated in Japan, but the managerial implications are universal. It is a must read for managers competing in the borderless world."--Kenichi Ohmae, Ohmae & Associates
"Nonaka and Takeuchi take on a subject that is truly on the frontier of management: theprocess by which companies learn and create competitively valuable knowledge. What is refreshing about this book is that Nonaka and Takeuchi go beyond the slogans that have characterized much of the previous work
on this subject, and delve into the specific organization structures and processes involved in organizational creativity and learning. They bring a wealth of specific, in-depth company evidence to bear on the task. The result is an important book which will advance both the literature as well as
corporate practice."--Michael E. Porter, C. Roland Christensen Professor of Business Administration, Harvard University



"A fascinating, exciting exposure to a new way of thinking about the knowledge-based company....Provides a model of knowledge creation that will be a touchstone of future work in this field....This important, imaginative book will challenge and intrigue managers and management scholars alike."--D.
Eleanor Westney, MIT Sloan School of Management in the Sloan Management Review
"A fascinating volume that will interest philosophers, managers, and more common readers....The analyses are so thorough that they make the one- and two-page descriptions in Forbes magazine seem like elementary fairy stories. The authors have done their research well and provide delightful
details."--Minneapolis Star Tribune
"Knowledge creation is to the 90s what excellence was to the 80s. I can't imagine a better book on organizational design for innovation. Nor can I imagine a better common focus for managers and scholars. This is the best and most original blend of organizational theory and practice we are likely to
see for some time."--Karl E. Weick, University of Michigan School of Business Administration
"This is the most creative book on management to come out of Japan. The same authors who introduced the rugby approach to new product development, now bring us a myriad of new concepts: tacit knowledge, the oneness of mind and body, middle-up-down management, hypertext organization, to name a few.
The insights for this book originated in Japan, but the managerial implications are universal. It is a must read for managers competing in the borderless world."--Kenichi Ohmae, Ohmae & Associates
"Nonaka and Takeuchi take on asubject that is truly on the frontier of management: the process by which companies learn and create competitively valuable knowledge. What is refreshing about this book is that Nonaka and Takeuchi go beyond the slogans that have characterized much of the previous work
on this subject, and delve into the specific organization structures and processes involved in organizational creativity and learning. They bring a wealth of specific, in-depth company evidence to bear on the task. The result is an important book which will advance both the literature as well as
corporate practice."--Michael E. Porter, C. Roland Christensen Professor of Business Administration, Harvard University


"A fascinating, exciting exposure to a new way of thinking about the knowledge-based company....Provides a model of knowledge creation that will be a touchstone of future work in this field....This important, imaginative book will challenge and intrigue managers and management scholars alike."--D. Eleanor Westney, MIT Sloan School of Management in the Sloan Management Review
"A fascinating volume that will interest philosophers, managers, and more common readers....The analyses are so thorough that they make the one- and two-page descriptions in Forbes magazine seem like elementary fairy stories. The authors have done their research well and provide delightful details."--Minneapolis Star Tribune
"Knowledge creation is to the 90s what excellence was to the 80s. I can't imagine a better book on organizational design for innovation. Nor can I imagine a better common focus for managers and scholars. This is the best and most original blend of organizational theory and practice we are likely to see for some time."--Karl E. Weick, University of Michigan School of Business Administration
"This is the most creative book on management to come out of Japan. The same authors who introduced the rugby approach to new product development, now bring us a myriad of new concepts: tacit knowledge, the oneness of mind and body, middle-up-down management, hypertext organization, to name a few. The insights for this book originated in Japan, but the managerial implications are universal. It is a must read for managers competing in the borderless world."--Kenichi Ohmae, Ohmae & Associates
"Nonaka and Takeuchi take on a subject that is truly on the frontier of management: the process bywhich companies learn and create competitively valuable knowledge. What is refreshing about this book is that Nonaka and Takeuchi go beyond the slogans that have characterized much of the previous work on this subject, and delve into the specific organization structures and processes involved in organizational creativity and learning. They bring a wealth of specific, in-depth company evidence to bear on the task. The result is an important book which will advance both the literature as well as corporate practice."--Michael E. Porter, C. Roland Christensen Professor of Business Administration, Harvard University



"A fascinating, exciting exposure to a new way of thinking about the knowledge-based company....Provides a model of knowledge creation that will be a touchstone of future work in this field....This important, imaginative book will challenge and intrigue managers and management scholars alike."--D. Eleanor Westney, MIT Sloan School of Management in the Sloan Management Review


"A fascinating volume that will interest philosophers, managers, and more common readers....The analyses are so thorough that they make the one- and two-page descriptions in Forbes magazine seem like elementary fairy stories. The authors have done their research well and provide delightful details."--Minneapolis Star Tribune


"Knowledge creation is to the 90s what excellence was to the 80s. I can't imagine a better book on organizational design for innovation. Nor can I imagine a better common focus for managers and scholars. This is the best and most original blend of organizational theory and practice we are likely to see for some time."--Karl E. Weick, University of Michigan School of Business Administration


"This is the most creative book on management to come out of Japan. The same authors who introduced the rugby approach to new product development, now bring us a myriad of new concepts: tacit knowledge, the oneness of mind and body, middle-up-down management, hypertext organization, to name a few. The insights for this book originated in Japan, but the managerial implications are universal. It is a must read for managers competing in the borderless world."--Kenichi Ohmae, Ohmae & Associates


"Nonaka and Takeuchi take on a subject that is truly on the frontier of management: the process by which companies learn and create competitively valuable knowledge. What is refreshing about this book is that Nonaka and Takeuchi go beyond the slogans that have characterized much of the previous work on this subject, and delve into the specific organization structures and processes involved in organizational creativity and learning. They bring a wealth of specific, in-depth company evidence to bear on the task. The result is an important book which will advance both the literature as well as corporate practice."--Michael E. Porter, C. Roland Christensen Professor of Business Administration, Harvard University


Kurzbeschreibung

How have Japanese companies become world leaders in the automotive and electronics industries, among others? What is the secret of their success? Two leading Japanese business experts, Ikujiro Nonaka and Hirotaka Takeuchi, are the first to tie the success of Japanese companies to their ability to create new knowledge and use it to produce successful products and technologies. In The Knowledge-Creating Company, Nonaka and Takeuchi provide an inside look at how Japanese companies go about creating this new knowledge organizationally.
The authors point out that there are two types of knowledge: explicit knowledge, contained in manuals and procedures, and tacit knowledge, learned only by experience, and communicated only indirectly, through metaphor and analogy. U.S. managers focus on explicit knowledge. The Japanese, on the other hand, focus on tacit knowledge. And this, the authors argue, is the key to their success--the Japanese have learned how to transform tacit into explicit knowledge.

To explain how this is done--and illuminate Japanese business practices as they do so--the authors range from Greek philosophy to Zen Buddhism, from classical economists to modern management gurus, illustrating the theory of organizational knowledge creation with case studies drawn from such firms as Honda, Canon, Matsushita, NEC, Nissan, 3M, GE, and even the U.S. Marines. For instance, using Matsushita's development of the Home Bakery (the world's first fully automated bread-baking machine for home use), they show how tacit knowledge can be converted to explicit knowledge: when the designers couldn't perfect the dough kneading mechanism, a software programmer apprenticed herself with the master baker at Osaka International Hotel, gained a tacit understanding of kneading, and then conveyed this information to the engineers. In addition, the authors show that, to create knowledge, the best management style is neither top-down nor bottom-up, but rather what they call "middle-up-down," in which the middle managers form a bridge between the ideals of top management and the chaotic realities of the frontline.
As we make the turn into the 21st century, a new society is emerging. Peter Drucker calls it the "knowledge society," one that is drastically different from the "industrial society," and one in which acquiring and applying knowledge will become key competitive factors. Nonaka and Takeuchi go a step further, arguing that creating knowledge will become the key to sustaining a competitive advantage in the future.

Because the competitive environment and customer preferences changes constantly, knowledge perishes quickly. With The Knowledge-Creating Company, managers have at their fingertips years of insight from Japanese firms that reveal how to create knowledge continuously, and how to exploit it to make successful new products, services, and systems.

Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 4396 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 304 Seiten
  • Verlag: Oxford University Press; Auflage: 1 (18. Mai 1995)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B0028N6MIG
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Aktiviert
  • Verbesserter Schriftsatz: Nicht aktiviert
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.8 von 5 Sternen 9 Kundenrezensionen
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: #430.284 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop (Siehe Top 100 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop)

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Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
According to authors, the goal of The Knowledge Creating Company was to (1) construct a new theory if organizational knowledge creation; (2) to provide a new explanation of why certain companies are successful at continuous innovation; and (3) develop a universal management model that converges management practices found in Japan and in the West. In my opinion Nonaka and Takeuchi did an excellent job in all three areas! The presentation of topics is clear and well written. I found chapter 3, Theory of Organizational Knowledge Creation, highly insightful, particularly in the discussion of the Two Dimensions of Organizational Knowledge - epistemological and ontological, and the Four Modes of Knowledge Conversion - socialization, externalization, combination, and internalization.
Drawing from companies such as Honda, Canon, 3M, and GE the authors effectively and convincingly use real world examples to demonstrate organizational knowledge creation.
Nonaka and Takeuchi also provide an in-depth view of Western and Japanese dichotomies and how "synthesis" of both philosophies' can create new solutions.
The Knowledge Creating Company is an excellent resource for Organizational Theory and Strategic Management students or anyone with an interest in how knowledge is created in Japanese and Western companies.
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Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
The book explores the eastern and western views of knowledge and how it is formed.
It provides significant insights into how organisations can manage and accumulate knowledge.
It goes way beyond Senge (The fifth Discipline) but includes Satre, Aristotle and others.
It ties in with Peter Checklands Information, Systems and Information Systems in a way that provides a useful guide to anyone challenged by organisational change,or involved in project or program management.
Solid Theory. Inspired case studies. Overall one of the best investments I ever made.
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Why have Japanese companies become successful? This book offers a new explanation. It is argued that success of Japanese companies is not due to manufacturing prowess; access to cheap capital; close and cooperative relationships with customers, suppliers and government agencies; or lifetime employment and other human resources management practices - although all of these factors are important. Instead the claim is made that Japanese companies have been successful because of their skills and expertise at "organisational knowledge creation". This term is defined as the capability of the company as a whole to create new knowledge, disseminate it throughout the organisation, and embody it in products, services, and systems.

The book's case studies demonstrate that this is the golden key to the distinctive ways that Japanese companies innovate continuously, incrementally and spirally.

Rugby provides a metaphor for the speed and flexibility with which Japanese companies develop new products - as in rugby, the ball gets passed within the team as it moves up the field as a unit. The ball being passed around in the team contains a shared understanding of what the company stands for, where it is going, what kind of a world it wants to live in, and how to make that world a reality. Highly subjective insights, intuitions, and hunches are also embraced. That's what the ball contains - namely, ideals, values, and emotions.

Ball movement in rugby is borne out of the team members' interplay on the field. It is determined on the spot ("here and now"), based on direct experience and trial and error. It requires an intensive and laborious interaction among members of the team.
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This book has examplified the difference on knowledge creation between western and eastern culture. Understanding the difference, and thus begin to examining the current paradigm and practice on knowledge creation process, can help organizations to improve the way they building intelligence capital fudamentally.
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I spent one whole week reading the book when I was doing my full time MBA and I just loved this book. It's articulate, interesting (except first two chapters, esp the second chapter - sorry to say that), and inspiring. However, be careful when you read it, especially about what the authors' intention is, i.e. to theorise about their rather unique perspective on the CREATION of ORGANISATIONAL (not individual) KNOWLEDGE. As such, don't miss the Preface, in which authors explain their intention of writing this book (their belief) - 'There is nothing so practical as a good theory' (mentioned by Kurt Lewin). That's all I wanted to say, enjoy reading it. And...the whole week I spent finally paid off, I got 'A' grade in this assignment - it adds to my happy memory on those days!! Take care.
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