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Ivan's War: Life and Death in the Red Army, 1939-1945 (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 23. Januar 2007

5.0 von 5 Sternen 1 Kundenrezension

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Produktinformation

Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

"Unprecedented in its approach, Catherine Merridale's research into the lives of Red Army soldiers combined with her perception makes this a most fascinating and important work."
--Antony Beevor, author of "Stalingrad"
"Catherine Merridale has done something very unusual. The Soviet war effort has been described many times but her new book tells the searing story from the bottom up. Her account of the sufferings of the Red Army soldiers and their families is unlikely to be bettered."
--Robert Service, author of "Stalin: A Biography"
""
"Merridale's new book is excellent. This unique, strikingly original account of the Red Army in World War II is a first-rate social history
as well as an important military study, and a stellar example of the combination of oral history with standard archival research. It makes the
soldiers of the Red Army come alive."
--Stanley Payne, Hilldale-Jaume Vicens Vives Professor of History, University of Wisconsin-Madison ""Ivan's War" is a marvelous book. All of Catherine Merridale's virtues are on display: remarkable research (based in this case on literally hundreds of interviews with survivors and witnesses); a clear, unpretentious style that belies the complexity of her material; comfortable historical command of a dauntingly large theme; and a rare compassion and empathy for her subjects. "Ivan's War" confirms what anyone who read "Night of Stone" already knew: that Catherine Merridale is a superb historian, among the very best of her generation."
--Tony Judt, author of "Postwar: A History of ""Europe"" Since 1945"""
"This is an inventively researched and evocatively written study of the Soviet soldier on theblood-ridden Eastern Front. Using freshly available archival materials, as well as sparkling interviews with a vanishing generation of veterans, Merridale has provided an empathetic and realistic portrait of the men and women who, more than any other combat soldiers, brought down the Third Reich."
"--"Norman M. Naimark, author of "The Russians in Germany" and "Fires of Hatred"


"Catherine Merridale has picked the locks that kept this history hidden. . . . Essential reading for anyone who wants to understand the history of the time."--"The Economist"
"[A] breathtaking, sweeping, yet well-balanced and finely tuned study."--"The Times Literary Supplement" (London)
"With extraordinary patience and a wonderful ear for nuance . . . [Merridale] produces what may be the best historical portrait of life in the Red Army yet published."--"The New York Review of Books"
"Combines, quite effectively, painstaking historical reconstruction and sympathetic projection."--"The New York Times""" "[A] profoundly empathic work of history."--"Newsday" "An impressive work of history, managing to give a sense of the amazing hardships of the frontoviki's experience."--"The New York Sun" "Succeeds admirably in fashioning a compelling portrait, helped immensely by her talent as a writer."--"Foreign Affairs" "[Merridale] does a marvelous job. "Ivan's War" is full of the type of information that will make you find someone to tell."--"Richmond Times Dispatch" "This book is the raw and bleeding version . . . a tightly edited, well-paced and very readable account."--"The Seattle Times"

Catherine Merridale has picked the locks that kept this history hidden. . . . Essential reading for anyone who wants to understand the history of the time. "The Economist"

[A] breathtaking, sweeping, yet well-balanced and finely tuned study. "The Times Literary Supplement (London)"

With extraordinary patience and a wonderful ear for nuance . . . [Merridale] produces what may be the best historical portrait of life in the Red Army yet published. "The New York Review of Books"

Combines, quite effectively, painstaking historical reconstruction and sympathetic projection. "The New York Times"

[A] profoundly empathic work of history. "Newsday"

An impressive work of history, managing to give a sense of the amazing hardships of the frontoviki's experience. "The New York Sun"

Succeeds admirably in fashioning a compelling portrait, helped immensely by her talent as a writer. "Foreign Affairs"

[Merridale] does a marvelous job. "Ivan's War" is full of the type of information that will make you find someone to tell. "Richmond Times Dispatch"

This book is the raw and bleeding version . . . a tightly edited, well-paced and very readable account. "The Seattle Times""

"Catherine Merridale has picked the locks that kept this history hidden. . . . Essential reading for anyone who wants to understand the history of the time. The Economist

[A] breathtaking, sweeping, yet well-balanced and finely tuned study. The Times Literary Supplement (London)

With extraordinary patience and a wonderful ear for nuance . . . [Merridale] produces what may be the best historical portrait of life in the Red Army yet published. The New York Review of Books

Combines, quite effectively, painstaking historical reconstruction and sympathetic projection. The New York Times

[A] profoundly empathic work of history. Newsday

An impressive work of history, managing to give a sense of the amazing hardships of the frontoviki's experience. The New York Sun

Succeeds admirably in fashioning a compelling portrait, helped immensely by her talent as a writer. Foreign Affairs

[Merridale] does a marvelous job. Ivan's War is full of the type of information that will make you find someone to tell. Richmond Times Dispatch

This book is the raw and bleeding version . . . a tightly edited, well-paced and very readable account. The Seattle Times"

"Unprecedented in its approach, Catherine Merridale's research into the lives of Red Army soldiers combined with her perception makes this a most fascinating and important work. Antony Beevor, author of Stalingrad

Catherine Merridale has done something very unusual. The Soviet war effort has been described many times but her new book tells the searing story from the bottom up. Her account of the sufferings of the Red Army soldiers and their families is unlikely to be bettered. Robert Service, author of Stalin: A Biography

Merridale's new book is excellent. This unique, strikingly original account of the Red Army in World War II is a first-rate social history as well as an important military study, and a stellar example of the combination of oral history with standard archival research. It makes the soldiers of the Red Army come alive. Stanley Payne, Hilldale-Jaume Vicens Vives Professor of History, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Ivan's War is a marvelous book. All of Catherine Merridale's virtues are on display: remarkable research (based in this case on literally hundreds of interviews with survivors and witnesses); a clear, unpretentious style that belies the complexity of her material; comfortable historical command of a dauntingly large theme; and a rare compassion and empathy for her subjects. Ivan's War confirms what anyone who read Night of Stone already knew: that Catherine Merridale is a superb historian, among the very best of her generation. Tony Judt, author of Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945

This is an inventively researched and evocatively written study of the Soviet soldier on the blood-ridden Eastern Front. Using freshly available archival materials, as well as sparkling interviews with a vanishing generation of veterans, Merridale has provided an empathetic and realistic portrait of the men and women who, more than any other combat soldiers, brought down the Third Reich. Norman M. Naimark, author of The Russians in Germany and Fires of Hatred

"

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

Catherine Merridale is the author of the critically acclaimed Night of Stone: Death and Memory in Twentieth-Century Russia. The professor of contemporary history at the University of London, she also writes for the London Review of Books, New Statesman, and the Independent.

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iwan's War; by Catherine Merridale. Jedermann muss diese Buch lesen: Unglaublig. Schrecklich. Ich habe schon 2 exemplaren an Freunden gegeben.
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Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.1 von 5 Sternen 101 Rezensionen
61 von 64 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen A Good Start, but sluggish ending for this `Social' History 29. März 2006
Von R. A Forczyk - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Catherine Merridale, a professor of contemporary history at the University of London, has written a nuanced social history of the Soviet soldier in the Second World in Ivan's War. This volume is not a military history and readers expecting such will be disappointed, but Merridale does offer an insightful glance into the soul of "Ivan" - the "G.I. Joe" of the Red Army. Overall, Ivan's War does provide context that is often lacking in other works about the East Front and this is a worthy effort, although the results that Merridale does achieve are open to debate. The main idea that Merridale's work conveys is that the sacrifices made by both the Soviet soldiers and citizens were betrayed by a Stalinist regime that saw them as only "little cogs in a machine." In the end, thanks to Ivan's tenacity, Merridale writes, "the motherland was never conquered" by the fascists but it had been enslaved by its own communist leaders.

The driving concept between this type of approach to history is to use oral accounts from veterans to add texture to broad themes that the author can then develop. To be honest, Merridale does not seem to have much flair for oral history and too many of her accounts are rather tepid. I get the impression that the Soviet vets either didn't want to talk to her since she was a foreigner - she hints at this - and those men she did interview were not the most desirable subjects. Given the availability of better Soviet accounts that have appeared since the fall of Communism, I find it hard to believe that Merridale could not have gotten some better material. Readers should note that Merridale's examination of "Ivan" is far from comprehensive - not only are there no accounts from the Red Air Force or Navy, but important branches such as artillery and cavalry are all but ignored. One need only go to "the Russian Battlefield" website to find dozens of veterans accounts, sorted by branch, that provide better detail than the accounts offered in Ivan's War. It is also odd that Merridale rarely mentions specific Soviet army units, even though Soviet vets are often proud of having served in this or that unit.

It is clear that Merridale has researched Soviet archives carefully. Unfortunately, I'm not sure that she knows how to use much of the information that she has gathered. For example, on page 215 she writes that 310,000 Soviet tankers were killed in the war out 403,000 trained, which seems like 76% fatalities. However, when I checked the footnoted source I realized that these numbers referred to only the period 1943-45 and also included personnel from mechanized units. Readers should treat her facts and figures with some circumspection.

Overall, the first two-thirds of the book, which covers the pre-war period up to 1944 is fairly interesting and well-written. This part of the book is quite enjoyable. Unfortunately, the last one-third of the book covers the period 1945 up to the current day and seems interminable. Somehow, the author's description of how Russian women wanted to marry wounded veterans for their pensions seems neither unique to the USSR or pertinent to life in the Red Army in 1939-45. In the last 70-80 pages or so the author appears to be wandering, having lost her focus once she passes VE Day.
59 von 68 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen An excellent social history of the wartime Red Army 7. Februar 2006
Von 1. - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Merridale has written an excellent social history of the Red Army and why Russian soldiers continued to fight throughout the war. Merridale believes that songs about missing loved ones,a personal faith in God, and a belief that Stalin's Russia would change after the war contributed to the fighting spirit of the Red Army soldier. Merridale also describes vividly the hell of the battle of Kerch in which thousands of Russian soldiers suffocated to death and Kursk in which tank crewmen suffered serious burns to their bodies. Merridale also writes about how these soldiers missed and distrusted their wives and this sense of sexual frustration ultimately contributed to the raping of Berlin in 1945. The only weakness of Merridale's book is that she leaves out the works by Dale Herspring which detail how commissars kept alive the morale of Russian soldiers and skims over the works by Robert Thurston who states how the Red Army soldier fought the war for ideological purposes. Despite these flaws this an important contribution to the study of the wartime Red Army.
49 von 57 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen When memory fails 25. Februar 2006
Von A Reader - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
This is a great book; it's been well-reviewed both in the press and here on Amazon.

However, the reviews have failed to mention what I found to be one of the most important features of the book: The significant lacunae in the historical record of the Red Army. Merridale shows how completely the historical reality of the Red Army experience has been replaced by the state-sanctioned mythology. Merridale describes sorting through the archives, sealed for sixty years, and finding that even the confidential reports by the internal Party spies are filled with bland pious generalities. Even as they were fighting and dying, the Army was selectively editing its official memory, removing any evidence of venality, cowardice, war crimes, insubordination and so on.

More disturbingly, the veterans Merridale interviews have edited their own memories, often describing scenes from propaganda movies as if they actually experienced them first-hand. Merridale's sympathetic treatment of the veterans' accounts makes this crime against memory all the more disturbing. In fact, Merridale's most vivid primary sources are the letters and diaries of front-line soldiers (most of whom were killed in action), preserved by grieving families.

In an odd way, Merridale's book is the perfect complement to a political-theoretical book like Hannah Arendt's "Totalitarianism". Arendt describes how the totalitarian state can control every aspect of human existence. Merridale shows that this control extended even to the chaos and relative freedom of the front line.
35 von 42 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Average 5. April 2006
Von Thomas Reiter - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
This is a pretty well-written book, probably worth reading for anyone interested in modern Russia or the Great Patriotic War (the Eastern Front of World War II).

First, it is important to point out that this book is not a work of military history, so if that's what you're expecting you'll be pretty disappointed.

Second, I think one of the blurbs on the book states that the author conducted over 200 interviews in writing the book. This may be the case, but the author seems to rely on perhaps a half dozen of these interviews for much of her anecdotal content. Most of the rest of her content seems to come from letters written by soldiers killed during the war, which are quoted extensively. To me, this heavy reliance on such letters is a weakness, because of the unknown effects of anticipated censorship or actual self-censorship. Who knows what Ivan really wanted to say to his family in the rear? Also, it seems possible that even today many of the families which retain such letters would be reluctant to disclose some letters for fear of their Ivan being seen as unpatriotic, etc.

Third, people already familiar with Russian WWII history are unlikely to learn very much from this book.

Fourth, as pointed out by other reviewers, I don't think that the book is particularly well-organized.

Overall this is a worthy book on a topic which has not received the attention that it deserves. Moreover, given the age of most of the veterans, it might be one of the last opportunities for such a work. That said, for an understanding of Russia and its society during the war, I would probably recommend Alexander Werth's excellent RUSSIA AT WAR over this book.
23 von 27 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen blame the author or the editor? 23. November 2006
Von Mark S - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
presented in a rough chronological sequence, "ivan's war" presents the russian army during the second world war.
the russian military is presented as being incompetent, racist, corrupt, greedy, prone to cowardice and gullible, it never being made clear if the incidents from the book are isolated or common place. while all true and while the book is about the russian army the author plays a disservice to her readers by implying that these traits were (are?) exclusive to the russians (communists). anyone with any experience of or knowledge of any nations military, past or present, will recognize that all of these incestuous traits, in whole or in part, continue to flourish.
far worse is the intrusive and subjective writing style of the author. her unconstrained narrative extends the book by at least a third but the real damage from her weak writing is that, at least w/me, is the reader is tempted to skim the massive, indulgent filler and then risks missing the very reason one is reading the book, the story of the russian soldier.
two stars for the exhaustive research squandered on an almost unreadable narrative.
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