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The Innocent Man von [Grisham, John]
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The Innocent Man Kindle Edition

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Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

John Grisham tackles nonfiction for the first time with The Innocent Man, a true tale about murder and injustice in a small town (that reads like one of his own bestselling novels). The Innocent Man chronicles the story of Ron Williamson, how he was arrested and charged with a crime he did not commit, how his case was (mis)handled and how an innocent man was sent to death row. Grisham's first work of nonfiction is shocking, disturbing, and enthralling--a must read for fiction and nonfiction fans. We had the opportunity to talk with John Grisham about the case and the book, read his responses below. --Daphne Durham
20 Second Interview: A Few Words with John Grisham

Q: After almost two decades of writing fiction, what compelled you to write non-fiction, particularly investigative journalism?
A: I was never tempted to write non-fiction, primarily because it's too much work. However, obviously, I love a good legal thriller, and the story of Ron Williamson has all the elements of a great suspenseful story.

Q: Why this case?
A: Ron Williamson and I are about the same age and we both grew up in small towns in the south. We both dreamed of being major league baseball players. Ron had the talent, I did not. When he left a small town in 1971 to pursue his dreams of major league glory, many thought he would be the next Mickey Mantle, the next great one from the state of Oklahoma. The story of Ron ending up on Death Row and almost being executed for a murder he did not commit was simply too good to pass up.

Q: How did you go about your research?
A: I started with his family. Ron is survived by two sisters who took care of him for most of his life. They gave me complete access to the family records, photographs, Ron's mental health records, and so on. There was also a truckload of trial transcripts, depositions, appeals, etc., that took about 18 months to organize and review. Many of the characters in the story are still alive and I traveled to Oklahoma countless times to interview them.

Q: Did your training as a lawyer help you?
A: Very much so. It enabled me to understand the legal issues involved in Ron's trial and his appeals. It also allowed me, as it always does, to be able to speak the language with lawyers and judges.

Q: Throughout your book you mention, The Dreams of Ada: A True Story of Murder, Obsession, and a Small Town. How did you come across that book, and how did it impact your writing The Innocent Man?
A: Several of the people in Oklahoma I met mentioned The Dreams of Ada to me, and I read it early on in the process. It is an astounding book, a great example of true crime writing, and I relied upon it heavily during my research. Robert Mayer, the author, was completely cooperative, and kept meticulous notes from his research 20 years earlier. Many of the same characters are involved in his story and mine.

Q: You take on some pretty controversial and heated topics in your book--the death penalty, prisoner’s rights, DNA analysis, police conduct, and more--were any of your own beliefs challenged by this story and its outcome?
A: None were challenged, but my eyes were open to the world of wrongful convictions. Even as a former criminal defense attorney, I had never spent much time worrying about wrongful convictions. But, unfortunately, they happen all the time in this country, and with increasing frequency.

Q: So many of the key players in this case are either still in office or practicing attorneys. Many family members and friends still live in the same small town. How do you think The Innocent Man will impact this community and other small rural towns as they struggle with the realities of the justice system?
A: Exonerations seem to be happening weekly. And with each one of them, the question is asked--how can an innocent man be convicted and kept in prison for 20 years? My book is the story of only one man, but it is a good example of how things can go terribly wrong with our judicial system. I have no idea how the book will be received in the small town of Ada, Oklahoma, or any other town.

Q: What do you hope your readers will take away from The Innocent Man?
A: A better understanding of how innocent people can be convicted, and a greater concern for the need to reimburse and rehabilitate innocent men after they have been released.


Amazon.com

John Grisham tackles nonfiction for the first time with The Innocent Man, a true tale about murder and injustice in a small town (that reads like one of his own bestselling novels). The Innocent Man chronicles the story of Ron Williamson, how he was arrested and charged with a crime he did not commit, how his case was (mis)handled and how an innocent man was sent to death row. Grisham's first work of nonfiction is shocking, disturbing, and enthralling--a must read for fiction and nonfiction fans. We had the opportunity to talk with John Grisham about the case and the book, read his responses below. --Daphne Durham
20 Second Interview: A Few Words with John Grisham

Q: After almost two decades of writing fiction, what compelled you to write non-fiction, particularly investigative journalism?
A: I was never tempted to write non-fiction, primarily because it's too much work. However, obviously, I love a good legal thriller, and the story of Ron Williamson has all the elements of a great suspenseful story.

Q: Why this case?
A: Ron Williamson and I are about the same age and we both grew up in small towns in the south. We both dreamed of being major league baseball players. Ron had the talent, I did not. When he left a small town in 1971 to pursue his dreams of major league glory, many thought he would be the next Mickey Mantle, the next great one from the state of Oklahoma. The story of Ron ending up on Death Row and almost being executed for a murder he did not commit was simply too good to pass up.

Q: How did you go about your research?
A: I started with his family. Ron is survived by two sisters who took care of him for most of his life. They gave me complete access to the family records, photographs, Ron's mental health records, and so on. There was also a truckload of trial transcripts, depositions, appeals, etc., that took about 18 months to organize and review. Many of the characters in the story are still alive and I traveled to Oklahoma countless times to interview them.

Q: Did your training as a lawyer help you?
A: Very much so. It enabled me to understand the legal issues involved in Ron's trial and his appeals. It also allowed me, as it always does, to be able to speak the language with lawyers and judges.

Q: Throughout your book you mention, The Dreams of Ada: A True Story of Murder, Obsession, and a Small Town. How did you come across that book, and how did it impact your writing The Innocent Man?
A: Several of the people in Oklahoma I met mentioned The Dreams of Ada to me, and I read it early on in the process. It is an astounding book, a great example of true crime writing, and I relied upon it heavily during my research. Robert Mayer, the author, was completely cooperative, and kept meticulous notes from his research 20 years earlier. Many of the same characters are involved in his story and mine.

Q: You take on some pretty controversial and heated topics in your book--the death penalty, prisoner’s rights, DNA analysis, police conduct, and more--were any of your own beliefs challenged by this story and its outcome?
A: None were challenged, but my eyes were open to the world of wrongful convictions. Even as a former criminal defense attorney, I had never spent much time worrying about wrongful convictions. But, unfortunately, they happen all the time in this country, and with increasing frequency.

Q: So many of the key players in this case are either still in office or practicing attorneys. Many family members and friends still live in the same small town. How do you think The Innocent Man will impact this community and other small rural towns as they struggle with the realities of the justice system?
A: Exonerations seem to be happening weekly. And with each one of them, the question is asked--how can an innocent man be convicted and kept in prison for 20 years? My book is the story of only one man, but it is a good example of how things can go terribly wrong with our judicial system. I have no idea how the book will be received in the small town of Ada, Oklahoma, or any other town.

Q: What do you hope your readers will take away from The Innocent Man?
A: A better understanding of how innocent people can be convicted, and a greater concern for the need to reimburse and rehabilitate innocent men after they have been released.



Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 6787 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 498 Seiten
  • ISBN-Quelle für Seitenzahl: 0099493578
  • Verlag: Cornerstone Digital (19. Januar 2010)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B00351YEVM
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Aktiviert
  • Screenreader: Unterstützt
  • Verbesserter Schriftsatz: Aktiviert
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 3.6 von 5 Sternen 18 Kundenrezensionen
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: #214.361 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop (Siehe Top 100 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop)

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Kundenrezensionen

Top-Kundenrezensionen

Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
I was trained as a lawyer and am a member of the bar (although I don't take private clients), but I haven't had much contact with criminal law. As a law student, I once assisted in the defense of a mentally handicapped man accused of attempted murder. From that experience, I was struck by how poorly the criminal justice system is designed for handling those who have mental problems. I wrote my J.D. thesis on that subject. This book brought all of those issues back to the front of my mind.

In recent years, many have been astonished to learn that DNA evidence has exonerated large numbers of people who have been convicted of murder and are residing on Death Row in one state or another. The legal theory is that ten should go free rather than one innocent person be misjudged. Clearly, the reality is nothing like that. Although there are many career criminals (that's how they earn their living), those who don't seek to commit crimes daily are often mistaken for those who do. For example, people with various mental problems will "act up" in ways that violate the law. Put them in jail, and they may attack a guard . . . making another law broken. The downward spiral can be pretty fast and dangerous for all involved.

In The Innocent Man, John Grisham has chosen an intriguing subject . . . the life of Ron Williamson, a favored son whose life once spread in potential glory before him as a professional baseball player. Due to chronic mental problems, Mr. Williamson's life began to unravel while he was still an athlete. After his athletic days were over, he often sought solace in alcohol . . . and sometimes drugs. Two women had accused him of rape, but he beat the raps. But when a local woman was murdered not far from his home, the police liked Mr. Williamson for the crime . . .
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Format: Audio CD
I was trained as a lawyer and am a member of the bar (although I don't take private clients), but I haven't had much contact with criminal law. As a law student, I once assisted in the defense of a mentally handicapped man accused of attempted murder. From that experience, I was struck by how poorly the criminal justice system is designed for handling those who have mental problems. I wrote my J.D. thesis on that subject. This book brought all of those issues back to the front of my mind.

In recent years, many have been astonished to learn that DNA evidence has exonerated large numbers of people who have been convicted of murder and are residing on Death Row in one state or another. The legal theory is that ten should go free rather than one innocent person be misjudged. Clearly, the reality is nothing like that. Although there are many career criminals (that's how they earn their living), those who don't seek to commit crimes daily are often mistaken for those who do. For example, people with various mental problems will "act up" in ways that violate the law. Put them in jail, and they may attack a guard . . . making another law broken. The downward spiral can be pretty fast and dangerous for all involved.

In The Innocent Man, John Grisham has chosen an intriguing subject . . . the life of Ron Williamson, a favored son whose life once spread in potential glory before him as a professional baseball player. Due to chronic mental problems, Mr. Williamson's life began to unravel while he was still an athlete. After his athletic days were over, he often sought solace in alcohol . . . and sometimes drugs. Two women had accused him of rape, but he beat the raps. But when a local woman was murdered not far from his home, the police liked Mr. Williamson for the crime . . .
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
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Von dieleseratz TOP 1000 REZENSENT am 12. Januar 2010
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
Es gibt sehr gute "True Crime"-Bücher, die es schaffen, dass man mit den "Helden" der tatsächlich stattgefundenen Geschichte leidet und sich dann auch mit ihnen freut, wenn es aufwärts geht.
Merkwürdigerweise schafft dies Grisham, der ja meist wirklich packende, facettenreiche Justizthriller schreibt, hier überhaupt nicht, obwohl ihm das Leben und die amerikanische Justiz eine interessante Vorlage lieferten.
Der Held der Geschichte berührt nur wenig, ist zwar unschuldig in die Mühlen der amerikanischen Justiz geraten, doch es ermüdet, Schritt für Schritt den langwierigen, komplizierten und deshalb auch langweiligen Kampf zu begleiten. Die Geschichte bietet zwar viel Fachwissen, aber wenig unterhaltsames.
Langweilig und schlecht geschrieben, weder Sachbuch noch Krimi, dazu oft auch noch sehr pathetisch und wie in kleinen Orten im Bible Belt sicherlich oft üblich, mit sehr vielen Hinweisen auf die vorherrschende starke Religiosität und Frömmigkeit, es wird viel gebetet und gepredigt - sicherlich trifft Grisham aber hier voll den amerikanischen Geschmack.
Fazit: Nicht lesenswert. Zum Thema "Todesstrafe" gibt es sehr gute Justizthriller und "True Crime"-Romane, die das Thema eindringlicher transportieren.
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Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Was uns an Grisham immer so fasziniert hat, waren seine Insiderkenntnisse aus dem Umfeld amerikanischer Gerichtsbarkeit. Man erfuhr was hinter den Kulissen abläuft, worin die Stärken und Schwächen der Gesetze liegen, was einen guten und schlechten Anwalt ausmacht.

Das Ganze war verpackt in eine spannende Story, die man schon nach wenigen Sätzen nur noch ungern aus der Hand legte.

Auch dieses Mal bekommt der Leser Einblicke in die Welt der amerikanischen Juristen. Hier geht es um die Entstehung und Aufdeckung von Fehlurteilen und den Umgang mit unschuldig Verurteilten.

Nur, dass es diesmal ein echter Fall ist, den Grisham akribisch recherchiert hat und in allen Details dem Leser unterbreitet.

Und darin liegt das Problem. Haben uns sonst die Schicksale seiner fiktiven Figuren tief berührt, so wirkt die Beschreibung des realen Helden hier oft dürr und distanziert. Die authentische Wiedergabe der Geschichte von Ron Williamson gestattet keine Raffung zugunsten der Spannung. Die Fakten bestimmen den Inhalt des Buches, nämlich den ermüdenden, langwierigen Kampf um Gerechtigkeit. Hätte Grisham sich die Geschichte ausgedacht, hätte er einen sympathischeren Helden erfunden und ihm einen facettenreicheren Charakter verliehen. Man sollte also vorgewarnt an das neue Werk von Grisham herangehen. Wer auf das sonstige Genre des Autors verzichtet und sich auf das dokumentarisch geprägte Buch einlässt, wird wie immer viel Wissenswertes finden. Wer Grishams Bücher als unterhaltsame Justizthriller geschätzt hat, sollte dieses hier überspringen.
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