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How Should a Person Be? von [Heti, Sheila]
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How Should a Person Be? Kindle Edition

4.7 von 5 Sternen 3 Kundenrezensionen

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Länge: 320 Seiten Word Wise: Aktiviert Verbesserter Schriftsatz: Aktiviert
PageFlip: Aktiviert Sprache: Englisch

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Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

Ms. Heti's deadpan, naked voice is what makes Sheila's journey so engaging [Her] mordant take on modernity encourages introspection. It is easy to see why a book on the anxiety of celebrity has turned the author into one herself. "The Economist"

A significant cultural artifact. "LA Review of Books"

Funny odd, original, and nearly unclassifiable Sheila Heti does know something about how many of us, right now, experience the world, and she has gotten that knowledge down on paper, in a form unlike any other novel I can think of. "David Haglund, The New York Times Book Review"

Utterly contemporary, wickedly clever, and profoundly irreverent. "Lilith Magazine"

[Sheila Heti] has an appealing restlessness, a curiosity about new forms, and an attractive freedom from pretentiousness or cant "How Should a Person Be? "offers a vital and funny picture of the excitements and longueurs of trying to be a young creator in a free, late-capitalist Western City This talented writer may well have identified a central dialectic of twenty-first-century postmodern being. "James Wood, The New Yorker"

Brutally honest and stylistically inventive, cerebral and sexy, this novel from life' employs a grab bag of literary forms and narrative styles on its search for the truth meandering and entertaining exploration of the big questions, rousting aesthetic, moral, religious and ethical concerns most novels wouldn't touch. "Michael David Lukas, San Francisco Chronicle"

A perfect summer read. It is also one of the bravest, strangest, most original novels I've read this year We care about Sheila's plight, but the souls in limbo here are, ultimately, our own. With so many references to the world outside of the fiction, this novel demands to know: Can art inform our lives, and tell us how to be? "Christopher Boucher, The Boston Globe"

It's a bawdy, idiosyncratic novel about art, sex, Toronto, female friendship, and the endless quest to learn how to live. The title makes me quake with envy. All good books should be called just that. "Chad Harbach, Entertainment Weekly's "Hey, what are you reading?""

Original...hilarious...Part confessional, part play, part novel, and more--it's one wild ride...Think HBO'S "Girls "in book form. "Marie Claire"

"How Should a Person Be?" teeters between youthful pretension and irony in ways that are as old as Flaubert's "Sentimental Education." . . but Ms. Heti manages to give Sheila's struggle a contemporary and particular feel. . . "How Should a Person Be?" reveals a talented young voice of a still inchoate generation. "Kay Hymowitz, The Wall Street Journal"

I read this eccentric book in one sitting, amazed, disgusted, intrigued, sometimes titillated I'll admit to that, but always in awe of this new Toronto writer who seems to be channeling Henry Miller one minute and Joan Didion the next. Heti's book is pretty ugly fiction, accent on the pretty. "Alan Cheuse, NPR's All Things Considered"

Heti's craft never fails Novels are supposed to grab one's attention, and Heti's wonderfully baggy, honest and affecting book does exactly that. "New Orleans Times Picayune"

Not the kind of book that comes along often. It's highly quotable, funny, shocking, anxiety-inducing and, finally, inspiring It is undeniably of the moment, a blueprint of how to be lost in the Internet Age. "Thought Catalog"

Heti's book is so boldly original, each sentence so gorgeously rendered, that the distinction between exceptional novel and exceptional memoir seems irrelevant "Michael Schaub, NPR Books"

Heti knows what she s doing much of the pleasure of How Should a Person Be? comes from watching her control the norms she s subverting. "Michelle Dean, Slate"

[A] really amazing metafiction-meets-nonfiction novel that's so funny and strange. It has a lot of the same concerns that Girls does. "Lena Dunham, Entertainment Weekly's "Stars Own Must List""

[A] breakthrough novel...Just as Mary McCarthy's "The Company She Keeps" (written at the same age) was an explosive and thrilling rejoinder to the serious, male coming-of-age saga exemplified during her era by Sartre's "The Age of Reason," Heti's book exuberantly appropriates the same, otherwise tired genre to encompass female experience. "How Should a Person Be?"'s deft, picaresque construction, which lightly-but-devastatingly parodies the mores of Toronto's art scene, has more in common with "Don Quixote" than with Lena Dunham's HBO series "Girls" or the fatuous blogs and social media it will, due to its use of constructed reality, inevitably be compared with Like [Kathy] Acker, [Heti] is a brilliant, original thinker and an engaging writer. "Chris Kraus, LA Review of Books"

If you're not already reading Sheila Heti's second novel "How Should A Person Be?," you should be. Heti's rousing, unapologetically messy, beautifully written, insightful and provocative book explores the frustrations and rewards of female friendship, and of trying to make art as a young woman in the 21st century. . . Heti is doing something very exciting within the form of the novel. "Jezebel"

Heti excels at developing a cast of engaging, colorful and flawed characters. "Willamette Week"

Enlightening, profoundly intelligent, and charming to read. . . . It reflects life in its incredible humor and in some of its weird bits that might be muddled or unclear . . . with anxiety, hilarity and lots of great conversation. "Interview Magazine"

There are no convenient epiphanies in Sheila Heti's newest book "How Should a Person Be?" Instead there are several intertwined, grinding and brilliantly uncomfortable ones that require the reader to shed a few dozen layers in the service of self-discovery. . . She may depart from broad harbors, but she is an analytic zealot, never imparting trite one-liners or excusing herself. Reading her is an act of participation, discomfort and joy. "SF Weekly"

Lena Dunham loves this novel A fresh spin on friendship, art, sex, and philosophy in five acts. And the prose, often taking the form of a numbered list, is always engaging. "Daily Candy"

[Heti creates] one of the most personable antiheroes ever Her tone can be earnest and eager to please, flippant and crass, terribly lucid and darkly funny Her tortured self-deprecation can read a little like Violette Leduc's, and her poetic bluntness sometimes reminds me of Eileen Myles, but these authors come to mind mostly because, like Heti, they have written about women with unusual detail and feeling. Heti truly has a startling voice all her own, and a fresh take on fiction and autobiography's overlap. "Bookforum"

A new kind of book and new kind of person. A book that risks everything--shatters every rule we women try to follow in order to be taken seriously--and thus is nothing less than groundbreaking: in form, sexually, relationally and as a major literary work. With this complex, artfully messy and hilarious novel, Heti has done the rare and generous thing of creating more room for the rest of us. This is how a person should be. "Miranda July, author of No One Belongs Here More Than You and It Chooses You"

Oh crap. I don't know how to begin talking about Sheila Heti or how good she is. People will say "How Should A Person Be?" is reminiscent of Patti Smith's "Just Kids" or Ann Patchett's "Truth & Beauty" and both of these things will be true. But I am still reeling from the originality of this novel. There are passages here so striking, to read them is to be punched in the heart. "Sloane Crosley, author of How Did You Get This Number"

A seriously strange but funny plunge into the quest for authenticity. "Margaret Atwood, @MargaretAtwood"

The book's form is fluid and unpredictable [and] the architecture gives the prose a circular, easy feeling, even though Heti is taking a hard look at what makes life meaningful and how one doesn't end up loveless and lost. It is book peopled by twentysomethings but works easily as a manual for anyone who happens to have run into a spiritual wall. "Sasha Frere-Jones, The Paris Review"

Utterly beguiling: blunt, charming, funny, and smart. Heti subtly weaves together ideas about sex, femininity and artistic ambition. Reading this genre-defying book was pure pleasure. "David Shields, author of Reality Hunger"

[A]n unforgettable book: intellectually exacting, unsettling in its fragility, bodily as anything painted by Freud, experimental yet crafted as hell, and yes, very funny. "The National Post"

Sheila Heti's novel-from-life, How Should a Person Be?, was published in Canada in 2010, but won't be out in the US until next June. Watch for it it's great. "Chad Harbach, author of The Art of Fielding"

Original, contemplative, and often tangential, this is an unorthodox compilation of colorful characters, friendship, and sex that provides an unusual answer to Heti's [titular] question. "Publishers Weekly""

Pressestimmen

“[Sheila Heti] has an appealing restlessness, a curiosity about new forms, and an attractive freedom from pretentiousness or cant…How Should a Person Be? offers a vital and funny picture of the excitements and longueurs of trying to be a young creator in a free, late-capitalist Western City…This talented writer may well have identified a central dialectic of twenty-first-century postmodern being.”—James Wood, The New Yorker

“I read this eccentric book in one sitting, amazed, disgusted, intrigued, sometimes titillated I’ll admit to that, but always in awe of this new Toronto writer who seems to be channeling Henry Miller one minute and Joan Didion the next.  Heti’s book is pretty ugly fiction, accent on the pretty.”
-- NPR All Things Considered

“Sheila Heti’s How Should A Person Be? Is Blowing Up”
-- Jezebel

“Heti’s book is so boldly original, each sentence so gorgeously rendered, that the distinction between exceptional novel and exceptional memoir seems irrelevant.”
-- NPR Books

“Heti excels at developing a cast of engaging, colorful and flawed characters.”
-- Willamette Week

“A perfect summer read. It is also one of the bravest, strangest, most original novels I’ve read this year…We care about Sheila’s plight, but the souls in limbo here are, ultimately, our own. With so many references to the world outside of the fiction, this novel demands to know: Can art inform our lives, and tell us how to be?”The Boston Globe

"[A] really amazing metafiction-meets-nonfiction novel that’s so funny and strange.  It has a lot of the same concerns that Girls does.” —Lena Dunham, Entertainment Weekly's "Stars Own Must List"

"[A] breakthrough novel...Just as Mary McCarthy’s The Company She Keeps (written at the same age) was an explosive and thrilling rejoinder to the serious, male coming-of-age saga exemplified during her era by Sartre’s The Age of Reason, Heti’s book exuberantly appropriates the same, otherwise tired genre to encompass female experience. How Should a Person Be?’s deft, picaresque construction, which lightly-but-devastatingly parodies the mores of Toronto’s art scene, has more in common with Don Quixote than with Lena Dunham’s HBO series “Girls” or the fatuous blogs and social media it will, due to its use of constructed reality, inevitably be compared with…Like [Kathy] Acker, [Heti] is a brilliant, original thinker and an engaging writer. " --Chris Kraus, LA Review of Books

“Lena Dunham loves this novel…A fresh spin on friendship, art, sex, and philosophy in five acts. And the prose, often taking the form of a numbered list, is always engaging.” Daily Candy

“[Heti creates] one of the most personable antiheroes ever… Her tone can be earnest and eager to please, flippant and crass, terribly lucid and darkly funny… Her tortured self-deprecation can read a little like Violette Leduc’s, and her poetic bluntness sometimes reminds me of Eileen Myles, but these authors come to mind mostly because, like Heti, they have written about women with unusual detail and feeling. Heti truly has a startling voice all her own, and a fresh take on fiction and autobiography’s overlap.” —Bookforum

"Original...hilarious...Part confessional, part play, part novel, and more—it’s one wild ride...Think HBO’S Girls in book form." —Marie Claire

"A new kind of book and new kind of person. A book that risks everything—shatters every rule we women try to follow in order to be taken seriously—and thus is nothing less than groundbreaking: in form, sexually, relationally and as a major literary work. With this complex, artfully messy and hilarious novel, Heti has done the rare and generous thing of creating more room for the rest of us. This is how a person should be."—Miranda July, author of No One Belongs Here More Than You and It Chooses You

“Oh crap. I don’t know how to begin talking about Sheila Heti or how good she is.  People will say How Should A Person Be? is reminiscent of Patti Smith’s Just Kids or Ann Patchett’s Truth & Beauty and both of these things will be true.  But I am still reeling from the originality of this novel.  There are passages here so striking, to read them is to be punched in the heart.”—Sloane Crosley, author of How Did You Get This Number

"A seriously strange but funny plunge into the quest for authenticity."—Margaret Atwood, @MargaretAtwood

"The book’s form is fluid and unpredictable… [and] the architecture gives the prose a circular, easy feeling, even though Heti is taking a hard look at what makes life meaningful and how one doesn’t end up loveless and lost. It is book peopled by twentysomethings but works easily as a manual for anyone who happens to have run into a spiritual wall."—Sasha Frere-Jones, The Paris Review

"Utterly beguiling: blunt, charming, funny, and smart. Heti subtly weaves together ideas about sex, femininity and artistic ambition. Reading this genre-defying book was pure pleasure."—David Shields, author of Reality Hunger

"[A]n unforgettable book: intellectually exacting, unsettling in its fragility, bodily as anything painted by Freud, experimental yet crafted as hell, and yes, very funny."—The National Post

"Sheila Heti’s novel-from-life, How Should a Person Be?, was published in Canada in 2010, but won’t be out in the US until next June. Watch for it – it’s great." —Chad Harbach, author of The Art of Fielding

“Original, contemplative, and often tangential, this is an unorthodox compilation of colorful characters, friendship, and sex that provides an unusual answer to Heti’s [titular] question.”—Publishers Weekly

 


Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 1252 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 320 Seiten
  • Verlag: Vintage Digital (24. Januar 2013)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B00AC05H1A
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Aktiviert
  • Verbesserter Schriftsatz: Aktiviert
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.7 von 5 Sternen 3 Kundenrezensionen
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: #54.389 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop (Siehe Top 100 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop)

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Ein Buch über das ich bei der Suche nach Miranda July gestolpert bin: die wirbt auch auf dem Cover.
Und: es lohnt sich. Eigentlich besteht das Buch aus vielen Einzelteilen, Erzählungen von Gesprächen in einem amerikanischen Intellektuellen-Milieu, in dem dann die großen Themen im lockeren Gespräch angesprochen werden. Dazwischen zum Teil aberwitzige Ich-Perspektive-Teile, in dem auch über die ganz großen Themen (Ich/ Sex/ Herkommen/ Welt) räsoniert wird. Dann einige Psalmodien, (zum Beispiel das Gebet an den Penis) die zwar im einzelnen wahnsinnig krude sind, insgesamt aber ein Buch ergeben, das Wucht hat, sich selbst alles traut und dabei alles ernst nimmt. Viel gewagt als Autorin, ich finde es gut.
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Scrambling for words to describe this book, which feels like it was written for me, addressing all the topics I struggle with & think about.

It's a brilliant, lucid, kind & knowledgeable book (or should I say it's just so damn good!) - & I will read it again & again.

So happy to have discovered Sheila Heti (through Women In Clothes).
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a great snapshot of today's
trouble to create and live
yourself as a project.

Wild, well written, a fresh
approach to literature.

Worth reading!
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Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x8acd65c4) von 5 Sternen 121 Rezensionen
36 von 41 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
HASH(0x8ac370e4) von 5 Sternen Pretty good 8. Juni 2012
Von rantboi - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Vine Kundenrezension eines kostenfreien Produkts ( Was ist das? )
The main reason I chose to read this novel is that another reviewer compared it to Scarlett Thomas, one of my favorite novelists. While I do see some similarities, I think that Thomas has far more interesting ideas that she explores with her writing, at least to me. How Should A Person Be? is a (semi?) autobiographical novel, whose main character, Sheila, is working on a play and hangs out with her artist friends, pondering the question in the title: how should a person be? I found the beginning of the novel to be quite boring, especially when she talked about her failed marriage. Thankfully, soon Sheila meets Margaux, a painter, and things get interesting from there. We get transcripts of conversations recorder on Sheila's recorder, and plenty of e-mails. I love that kind of stuff in novels. She also meets Israel, an artist that she says is much better in bed than at art. There is a quite explicit chapter close to the middle of the book where Sheila rants about Israel and how everyone should get together with him, which was quite hilarious. There was a chapter in the beginning of the book where Sheila talks to her Jungian analyst about what it means to be a puer aeternus, a person who never really grows up. That section spoke to me more than anything else in the whole book.

Overall, I really liked How Should A Person Be? It was a pretty quick read. It was at turns boring, depressing, funny, touching, insightful, and even repulsive. It's a novel about what it means to be an artist, what it means to be a woman, and more importantly, what it means to be human. There is no great answer at the end of the book, but isn't that the way life is anyway?

Recommended if you're in the mood for something a little different, that makes you think about the meaning (or meaninglessness) of it all, for a little while.
36 von 43 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
HASH(0x9ffdcdf8) von 5 Sternen Another man who learned something from Sheila Heti 2. August 2012
Von Parker Sims - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
This is not a novel for the faint of heart. It is at times crushing, hilarious, biting, and insightful. But more than anything, it is brave. Heti is genius in a way that hurts my feelings, and she risks our understanding of that brilliance by delivering a novel that is meticulously crafted to feel ugly. The complexity, the vulgarity, and the flip dialogue are no mistake, oversight, or a symptom of lazy writing. Like it or not, you connect with the protagonist--and Heti herself--because she is as scattered and insecure as we all are. That's why we love her, why we hate her, and sometimes why we can't stand her (as previous reviews can attest). It's those qualities, or lack thereof, that make the book such an arresting read.

Though I suspected at first I wasn't the target audience, I plowed through this unlikely masterwork in a weekend. It's a daring piece of literary "fiction" that you really have to let wash over you. I had never read anything like it (and I doubt many have), yet it always felt familiar. It's an important book, one I've been recommending to nearly everyone I know.
32 von 40 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
HASH(0x9ffdcd38) von 5 Sternen How should we then live? 4. Mai 2012
Von K. Sullivan - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Vine Kundenrezension eines kostenfreien Produkts ( Was ist das? )
Sheila is a divorced playwright living in Toronto. Although she has a broader social circle centered in the local art scene, she latches onto one particular artist, Margaux, after her divorce. They quickly journey from casual acquaintance and mutual admiration to close friendship, something more fulfilling but entailing more risk as well. Romantically, she becomes the lust interest of the sexy, brooding artist, Israel. The novel uses these relationships as a means for Sheila's self-exploration. Structurally, there's a loose linear narrative, but it's hardly the book's focus. Sheila is obsessed with determining how she should live. How is a young female artist supposed to be? As she reminisces about past boyfriends, finds and loses a husband, makes new friends, and struggles to write (and alternately to avoid writing) a "feminine" (if not feminist) play - while her friends compete to see who can create the ugliest painting - she reveals herself and her search to the reader.

"How Should a Person Be?" is no conventional novel, but a fictionalized (to what extent?) memoir. Sheila is the only character developed in any way. Margaux and Israel (and the other bit players) exist only as a means for Sheila's own self-exploration and expression. So if Margaux appears to be something of an artistic savant, incredibly gifted but socially awkward and aloof, and Israel appears to be sadistic and perverse, focused only on deriving sexual pleasure from Sheila's humiliation, perhaps they aren't to blame. Sheila's inner life is the novel's focus.

Sheila is an engaging, fascinating protagonist. Profoundly self-aware, she exposes her thoughts, feelings, and motivations with complete transparency. Whether she's tapping into Jungian archetypes like the Puer Aeternus and analyzing dreams or pondering her Jewish heritage in the vein of how Moses' struggles might mirror her own, her mind is vibrant and alive. She's completely empathetic because her plight is universal. Her voice is utterly authentic (surely in no small part due to the not so subtle autobiographical nature of the novel).

As intriguing and enjoyable as the novel is, however, the latter half doesn't fulfill the promise of the beginning. Sheila's search doesn't culminate in anything radical if it can be said to culminate at all. Although she arrives at certain conclusions and learns a few lessons, the search is by no means complete. Sheila doesn't seem to have obviously or substantively matured or evolved in any meaningful way over the course of the novel. The author provides a delightfully intimate portrait of her struggle, but it's clearly ongoing. To that end, a sequel in a few years time would provide a very intriguing case study!

Readers who enjoy Scarlett Thomas' novels would likely enjoy this one. The protagonists share more than a passing resemblance and they explore similar themes.
20 von 24 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
HASH(0x9ffdde30) von 5 Sternen This is unreadable. 23. April 2013
Von Mata Hari - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
This book is really the first novel I have been unable to finish.It is self-indulgent poorly written claptrap and I would advise any one thinking of reading it to STOP NOW. I feel like I deserve my money and my time back. Who was the editor? How did this book get into print? Someone should be answerable for this heinous crime perpetrated on the reading public. It is essentially like those conversations you overhear on the bus between narcissistic 15 year olds, and are so annoyed by that you get off early so you don't have to endure it further.
7 von 7 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
HASH(0x9c807a68) von 5 Sternen over-rated? 15. Mai 2013
Von N. Ferguson R. - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Vine Kundenrezension eines kostenfreien Produkts ( Was ist das? )
A relatively quick and wildly inconsistent read which I can only describe as time spent with a less than likeable main character. While this book has humorous moments, dreary and depressing moments, and emotionally resonant moments, it also is repellant at many points.

How Should a Person Be? is marketed as a novel about the path of the artist and about what it means to be human. I'm not sure that it is successful in accomplishing either of these lofty goals, but perhaps it is a reflection of one rather unpleasant person's reality- and that is, I suppose, one path an artist can take.
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