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The First 90 Days: Critical Success Strategies for New Leaders at All Levels (Your Coach in a Box) (Englisch) Audio-CD – Audiobook, Ungekürzte Ausgabe

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-- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: Gebundene Ausgabe.
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Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

“His wisdom, and research, has helped many masterfully onboard into new positions.” — Forbes.com

“Watkins has taken a rather prosaic proposition (first impressions count) and built around it a handbook that grown-ups can use in business, particularly in times of change and transition.” — Idealog (New Zealand)

“A useful addition to leadership studies collections.” — Choice magazine

The First 90 Days is a rich source of material for any executive coach and of course any uncoached executive. I highly recommend it.” — Coaching Today

The First 90 Days and its digital counterpart serve as valued resources for leaders just stepping into a critical new role—when first impressions matter so much, and every word or deed can tip the scale of public opinion.” — T+D magazine (American Society for Training & Development)

“No business holding should be without this expanded coverage.” — Midwest Book Review

“Any person who gets a new job or promotion or position, can use this book to be more effective in the first 3 months on the job…. It is no doubt that [The First 90 Days] has lasting-power and will remain popular and useful for many years to come.” — 800 CEO READ

“…packed with practical suggestions for how to successfully navigate through new scenarios.” — GuruFocus.com

“In his seminal book The First 90 Days, Michael Watkins advises that, as a leader in the first 90 days of a new leadership role, you should promote yourself, accelerate your learning, match your strategy to the situation, and create coalitions.” — FastCompany.com

“a superb guide” — Globe & Mail
-- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: Gebundene Ausgabe.

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

Michael D. Watkins is a cofounder of Genesis Advisers, a leadership development consultancy that specializes in the design of onboarding and transition acceleration solutions, workshops, and coaching for Fortune 500 companies.
-- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: Gebundene Ausgabe.


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M. Watkins schafft es anhand von neun Punkten und vielen Beispielen eine gute Hilfestellung für neue Herausforderungen im Berufsleben zu geben. Der Praxisbezug wird durch integrierte Checklisten und Analysetools erweitert. Das STARS-Modell ist mein Favorit, da es sehr einfach und doch umfassend ist. Dieses Buch ist für alle neuen Manager ein Muss!
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Amazon.com: HASH(0x91d75ea0) von 5 Sternen 583 Rezensionen
445 von 476 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
HASH(0x91ef08d0) von 5 Sternen An antidote to sink or swim 20. Dezember 2004
Von Peter Leerskov - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
This book is not just for managers at the executive level. It's also for you and me. It's for functional managers, project managers, and supervisors. The book targets new leaders at all levels that are making the transition from one rung of the ladder to the next.

If you have just been promoted to a new leadership position (or expect to be soon), then this book is for you.

The book outlines ten strategies that will shorten the time it takes you to reach what Watkins calls the breakeven point: the point at which your organization needs you as much as you need the job. Here they are ... the ten strategies:

1. PROMOTE YOURSELF. Make a mental break from your old job. Prepare to take charge in the new one. Don't assume that what has made you successful so far will continue to do so. The dangers of sticking with what you know, working hard at doing it, and failing miserably are very real.

2. ACCELERATE YOUR LEARNING. Climb the learning curve as fast as you can in your new organization. Understand markets, products, technologies, systems, and structures, as well as its culture and politics. It feels like drinking from a fire hose. So you have to be systematic and focused about deciding what you need to learn.

3. MATCH STRATEGY TO SITUATION. There are no universal rules for success in transitions. You need to diagnose the business situation accurately and clarify its challenges and opportunities. The author identifies four very different situations: launching a start-up, leading a turnaround, devising a realignment, and sustaining a high-performing unit. You need to know what your unique situation looks like before you develop your action plan.

4. SECURE EARLY WINS. Early victories build your credibility and create momentum. They create virtuous cycles that leverage organizational energy. In the first few weeks, you need to identify opportunities to build personal credibility. In the first 90 days, you need to identify ways to create value and improve business results.

5. NEGOTIATE SUCCESS. You need to figure out how to build a productive working relationship with your new boss and manage his or her expectations. No other relationship is more important. This means having a series of critical talks about the situation, expectations, style, resources, and your personal development. Crucially, it means developing and gaining consensus on your 90-day plan.

6. ACHIEVE ALIGNMENT. The higher you rise in an organization, the more you have to play the role of organizational architect. This means figuring out whether the organization's strategy is sound, bringing its structure into alignment with its strategy, and developing the systems and skills bases necessary to realize strategic intent.

7. BUILD YOUR TEAM. If you are inheriting a team, you will need to evaluate its members. Perhaps you need to restructure it to better meet demands of the situation. Your willingness to make tough early personnel calls and your capacity to select the right people for the right positions are among the most important drivers of success during your transition.

8. CREATE COALITIONS. Your success will depend on your ability to influence people outside your direct line of control. Supportive alliances, both internal and external, will be necessary to achieve your goals.

9. KEEP YOUR BALANCE. The risks of losing perspective, getting isolated, and making bad calls are ever present during transitions. The right advice-and-counsel network is an indispensable resource

10. EXPEDITE EVERYONE. Finally, you need to help everyone else - direct reports, bosses, and peers - accelerate their own transitions. The quicker you can get your new direct reports up to speed, the more you will help your own performance.

This book is not only relevant on the individual level. This transition process for new managers happens so often that it should be handled with more professionalism by (big) organizations. Whereas we as managers try to work actively with introduction programmes and training for new employees, then many managers must face their transition challenge alone. It shouldn't be like that. The "sink or swim" approach should be doomed.

Peter Leerskov,
M.Sc. in International Business (Marketing & Management) and Graduate Diploma in E-business
90 von 93 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
HASH(0x91c784c8) von 5 Sternen Must-read for any manager or new employee 12. Februar 2015
Von JustinHoca - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
This is a really useful book filled with sage advice for anyone assuming a leadership position, particularly as a former outsider to the organization. It's filled with reminders that you don't walk in with "the answer," that instead winning the trust and respect of your cohorts is a learning process that you should begin with great intensity. The first half of the book relates directly to someone who is assuming a management role, the next quarter of the book is about what to do as a new employee serving under a boss or bosses (perhaps as a mid-level manager). The last bit of the book gives a brief introduction to strategic thinking and the book concludes with questions to ask yourself (and your family) in evaluating your transition. It is applicable to any firm, church, non-profit, and even (mostly) the government.

Here's a summary of the points I gleaned:
- Establish your integrity in first 30 days.
- Learn all you can about the organization, put on your "historian" hat.
- Don't suggest changes without examining what has been done previously.
- Silence is not accession.
- Meet with everyone in the organization to evaluate their expectations. Ask them what they think you should focus on.
- Ask same questions of all so no one treated different and you have a cross-section.
- Look for "early wins," low-hanging fruit of improvements you can make or other things to boost morale.

Dealing with your boss in the first 30 days:
- Be proactive, assume it's on your shoulders to build the relationship and get the support you need.
- Schedule meetings to discuss expectations, evaluations, and personal development.
- Figure out what would give your boss "early wins." Make his priorities your priorities.
- Be proactive in doing things that will allow your boss to hear from people he trusts that you're a good worker.
- Don't bring your boss bad news early, at least without bringing good news too.
- Don't assume he will change. He has a style, foibles, accept them and work around then and move on. You can learn a lot from a bad boss, and you will likely have many.
- Examine how others relate to your boss and how he responds.

Strategy
- Begin figuring out who you need to move off your team immediately, whose roles need to change, and who you need to evaluate further.
- Think strategically. After your first 90 days you should be able to present a plan that is actionable.
- Evaluate the vision of the organization, its values, and use SWOT analysis.

Ask yourself feedback questions every week.
- What isn't going well. Why? What can you change?
- What are you least happy about. What can you change about it?
- What meeting troubled you the most? ""
- What conflict needs to be most resolved? ""

Family also has to be considered. How is your new role and time commitment affecting your family? Was the move worth it?

The author doesn't state it like this, but focus on doing what's best next.

I give this book 4.5 stars out of 5. I highly recommend it.
171 von 186 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
HASH(0x91969e88) von 5 Sternen Slightly second to Neff & Citrin, worth reading both 9. April 2005
Von Robert David STEELE Vivas - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
This is a fine book with a lot of substance, and I place it slightly second to Thomas Neff and James Citrin's "You're in Charge--NOW WHAT?."

From my point of view as the reader, Neff & Citrin actually catalyzed me and inspired me into preparing a 100 day plan broken into 10 ten-day blocks, while Watkins is more of a manual with lots of useful checklists and suggested questions and so on, but between the two, Neff & Citrin actually drove me to the needed outcome: my own 100 day plan.

Both are good. If you buy only one, buy Neff & Citrin, but I do recommend that you buy both, read Neff & Citrin first, and then cherry pick from Watkins--the cost of these books is trivial in comparison to the return on investment.
158 von 175 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
HASH(0x91964db0) von 5 Sternen First 90 Days came up short... 31. Dezember 2005
Von D. Kanigan - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
I bought "The First 90 days" by Michael Watkins and Neff/Citrin's book titled "You're in Charge - Now What." I found Neff's book to be a stronger and more practical guide. Both offered excellent guidance however Neff & Citrin produced a more interesting and readable (less text-book like) book with real life examples and a road map. Word of warning in that both books are written for senior business management and less applicable for lower levels of management or line positions.
43 von 45 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
HASH(0x919699b4) von 5 Sternen How and why the first 90 days in a new leadership position can sometimes seem like 90 minutes 10. Mai 2013
Von Robert Morris - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
This is a revised and updated edition of a book I read when it was published in 2003. Although much has (and hasn't) happened in the business world since then, Michael Watkins' insights are (if anything) even more relevant and more valuable now than they were then because the actions taken by those in a new role, especially one with more challenging leadership responsibilities, will largely determine whether they succeed or fail. "When leaders derail," Watkins notes, "their problems can almost always be traced to vicious cycles that developed in the first few months on the job." Ninety percent of those whom Watkins interviewed agreed that "transitions into new roles are the most challenging times in the professional lives of leaders." They could be internal promotions, reassignments and/or relocations, or a new hire. These and other transitions are thoroughly discussed in the book.

These are among the dozens of passages that caught my eye, also listed to suggest the scope of Watkins' coverage.

o Avoiding Transition Traps (Pages 5-6)
o Understanding the Fundamental Principles (9-12)
o Getting promoted (21-24)
o Table 1-1, "Onboarding checklists" (34)
o Identifying the Best Sources of Insight (54-57)
o Table 2-1, "Structured methods for learning" (61-62)
o "Emotional Expensiveness" (63-64)
o Planning for Five [Transition-Specific] Conversations (90-93)
o Planning the Expectations Conversation (98-100)
o Adopting Basic Principles (121-122)
o Avoiding Common Alignment Traps (141-143)
o Getting Started (146-148)
o Avoiding Common Team-Building Traps (167-170)
o Building Support for Early-Win Objectives (202-220)
o Understanding the Three Pillars of Self-Management (227-237)
o Table 10-1, "Reasons for transition failures" (245)

The information, insights, and counsel he provides in this book reveal what he has learned thus far about what he characterizes as "The Vicious Cycle of Transitions" and "The Virtuous Cycle of Transitions." The former involves sticking with what you know, falling prey to the "action imperative," setting unrealistic expectations, attempting to do too much, coming in with "the" answer, engaging in the wrong kind of learning, and neglecting horizontal relationships. (Please check out Figure 1-2 on Page 7.)

With regard to the latter cycle, the "virtuous" one, can enable anyone involved in a transition to create momentum and establish an upward spiral of increasing effectiveness. (Please check out Figure 1-3 on Page 8.) To repeat, this updated and expanded edition develops in greater depth and wider scope the core concepts introduced in the first edition. The objective in 2003 remains the same now: "get up to speed faster and smarter."

Michael Watkins can help each reader to do that; better yet, he can each reader, especially those with supervisory responsibilities, to help others to do that. That achievement is indeed an admirable objective. However, we are well-advised to recall Thomas Edison's observation, "Vision without execution is hallucination."
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