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Europa von [Parks, Tim]
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Europa Kindle Edition

3.9 von 5 Sternen 12 Kundenrezensionen

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Länge: 276 Seiten Word Wise: Aktiviert Verbesserter Schriftsatz: Aktiviert
PageFlip: Aktiviert Sprache: Englisch

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Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

Jerry Marlow is on a coach hurtling from Milan to Strasbourg, even though he loathes coaches and everything they stand for:
...all the contemporary pieties of getting people together and moving them off in one direction or another to have fun together, or to edify themselves, or to show solidarity to some underprivileged minority and everybody, as I said, being of the same mind and of one intent, every individual possessed by the spirit of the group, which is the very spirit apparently of humanity, and indeed that of Europe, come to think of it, which this group is now hurtling off to appeal.
Jerry, suffice to say, is not a team player--not even when it comes to saving his own job. Together with a group of colleagues and students from the University of Milan, he's off to the European Parliament to protest new Italian laws against hiring foreigners--a cause which he opposes, appealing to an institution he's not sure should exist.

So why is Jerry on the coach in the first place? Because she is there--the same she for whom Jerry left his wife and daughter and who has since broken his heart. The unnamed she in question is a beautiful French woman (of course), a hellcat in bed (it goes without saying), and an intellect of notable refinement (naturellement). She was also unfaithful, and now they scarcely speak to one another. The rest of this dark and often savagely funny novel (shortlisted for the 1997 Booker Prize) consists of one great Joycean rant, a stream-of-consciousness harangue that circles obsessively around sex, the treachery of she, and Jerry's boundless misanthropy. In between we get glimpses of the bus and its motley cast of characters, including, most vividly, Vikram Griffiths, part Welsh, part Indian, with his nervous tics and his self-consciously Welsh accent and his shaggy mutt, Dafydd. As one might deduce from the title, the dream of the new, unified Europe looms behind this tale like--well, like a big, unwieldy metaphor, given expression in the form of Jerry's affair. As a meditation on the continent's future, the novel works surprisingly well, and though it initially takes some time to sort out the looping rhythms of Parks's prose, the reader's patience is repaid in spades. --Mary Park

Amazon.com

Jerry Marlow is on a coach hurtling from Milan to Strasbourg, even though he loathes coaches and everything they stand for:
...all the contemporary pieties of getting people together and moving them off in one direction or another to have fun together, or to edify themselves, or to show solidarity to some underprivileged minority and everybody, as I said, being of the same mind and of one intent, every individual possessed by the spirit of the group, which is the very spirit apparently of humanity, and indeed that of Europe, come to think of it, which this group is now hurtling off to appeal.
Jerry, suffice to say, is not a team player--not even when it comes to saving his own job. Together with a group of colleagues and students from the University of Milan, he's off to the European Parliament to protest new Italian laws against hiring foreigners--a cause which he opposes, appealing to an institution he's not sure should exist.

So why is Jerry on the coach in the first place? Because she is there--the same she for whom Jerry left his wife and daughter and who has since broken his heart. The unnamed she in question is a beautiful French woman (of course), a hellcat in bed (it goes without saying), and an intellect of notable refinement (naturellement). She was also unfaithful, and now they scarcely speak to one another. The rest of this dark and often savagely funny novel (shortlisted for the 1997 Booker Prize) consists of one great Joycean rant, a stream-of-consciousness harangue that circles obsessively around sex, the treachery of she, and Jerry's boundless misanthropy. In between we get glimpses of the bus and its motley cast of characters, including, most vividly, Vikram Griffiths, part Welsh, part Indian, with his nervous tics and his self-consciously Welsh accent and his shaggy mutt, Dafydd. As one might deduce from the title, the dream of the new, unified Europe looms behind this tale like--well, like a big, unwieldy metaphor, given expression in the form of Jerry's affair. As a meditation on the continent's future, the novel works surprisingly well, and though it initially takes some time to sort out the looping rhythms of Parks's prose, the reader's patience is repaid in spades. --Mary Park


Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 608 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 276 Seiten
  • Verlag: Vintage Digital; Auflage: New Ed (12. Juni 2012)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B0089WGVFO
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Aktiviert
  • Verbesserter Schriftsatz: Aktiviert
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 3.9 von 5 Sternen 12 Kundenrezensionen
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: #761.317 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop (Siehe Top 100 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop)

  •  Ist der Verkauf dieses Produkts für Sie nicht akzeptabel?

Kundenrezensionen

3.9 von 5 Sternen
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Top-Kundenrezensionen

Von Ein Kunde am 19. März 2000
Format: Taschenbuch
It's too bad that this excellent writer was given short shriftby David Gates in the New York Times, because if he achieved thebest-sellerdom he deserves in the states we might see some of his excellent novels turned into films.
But to get to the point, the things other people found fault with (too much inner life) I adored. I am so tired of lame plots and lamer dialogue. This book does what it does brilliantly, so why not leave it be? His meditation on dogs was daring and priceless, as was his general PC bashing. American readers like Gates probably missed alot -- i.e., the unification of Europe harking back to Napoleonic gradiosity. It's too bad Americans are so ill educated they can't see how well the author works in so many allusions and western myths. Parks is a one-of-a kind author. My only complaint here is that he doesn't explain his wife sufficiently -- a sketch of a woman who does nothing but vacuum is a bit lazy, even if her parents did buy them a flat. But this book excells in so many other areas where most novels don't even try, I don't take take points off. END
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I picked up this book during my own tour of Europa. I was in a Prague bookshop, starving for some English-language fiction. Seeing this appropriately titled piece, I grabbed it and read the first line (my preliminary test for all book purchases). I was hooked.
Parks' prose, in a stream-of-consciousness/James Joyce fashion, is addictive. He lets you inside his head -- thoughts often interrupt his conversations and each other -- and you don't want to get out. You'll laugh out loud over his obsessiveness over a colleague/ex-mistress and probably even relate to some of his twisted feelings.
Perfect for anyone who's driven themselves mad over suddenly unrequited (but not at all pristine) love.
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The campus novel goes off campus, or more specifically on a coach journey to the European Parliament. The motley crew of language lecturers and their students from Milan are going to the parliament to protest about the treatment of non-habilitated lecturers. Someone will be a hero, but who? The characters are all beautifully described, and the plot never slows down. If you've enjoyed books like "Changing Places by David Lodge or Malcolm Bradbury's "Dr Criminale", Europa is also bound to please.
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Europa is a hodge-podge of philosophical musings, unlikely characters, uninteresting recollections, and un-noteworthy events that left me cold.
Jerry Marlow, a college professor, is the main protagonist who with his colleagues sets off on a long-distance bus trip to save their jobs by lobbying with a group of European bureaucrats. He has no interest in doing this, but does so because his French ex-girlfriend is along as well. She's a character that we never manage to like, therefore the reader never wishes that the two should get back together.
In fact, the reader never manages to like Jerry; his philosophical pondering comes across more like pretentious self-important whining. The only other character of note is a Welsh speaking Indian born and bread in Wales, a character so unlikely and outlandish that the reader never quite buys the concept.
There are some interesting points in the book, and more than one passage that made me laugh. But in the end, one gets the feeling the author is more interested in impressing the reader with his sophistication and cultural breadth than telling a readable story or developing interesting characters
Looking for a novel about a man seeking love lost amidst a colorful political backdrop? Try Ronan Bennett's expertly written "The Catastrophist".
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In addition to all of the (positive) things said in the other reviews posted here, what struck me about this novel was that it was about a man who moves from being alienated (a man who only falls for "foreign" women, a man alienated most of all, from a mileu that celebrates, PC-wise, "difference" and "the other")--to...something else. The point being that he IS moved to something. I was afraid the book would end with one of those winky winky ironic, desolate flourishes--it does not. These are large, relevant themes--alienation, relativism, personal (and national) morality--and in the end, this book and this author is on the side of meaning, as so many post-modern, ironic novels are not. When everyone is "other," when every action can be rationalized as valid within the framework of an irrefutable (because unjudgeable), private morality, there is no meaning. When only words, or the way that we SAY things happen, our PERSONAL (or national) interpretations count, rather than what we have actually done, there is no meaning. No real connection or communication between every "other" (individuals, nations.) Interestingly, one human response to that (on the main character's, Jerry's part) is violence--he will MAKE something happen, make his actions mean something, even if it isn't the meaning he wanted, SOME meaning is better than none--which has got to be the only reason there is for random, apparently senseless violence. Besides all of this (ie, that it seems to me a thoughtful, philosophical but not pretentious, relevant, redemptive novel), Parks' writing is gorgeous, his characters human and familiar.
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